Regulation of human osteoclast development by dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP)

Authors

  • Ya-Hui Chiu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Allergy/Immunology & Rheumatology Division, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    2. The Center for Musculoskeletal Research, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    • Allergy/Immunology & Rheumatology Division, Box 695, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
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  • Kofi A Mensah,

    1. The Center for Musculoskeletal Research, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    2. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Edward M Schwarz,

    1. The Center for Musculoskeletal Research, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    2. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Yawen Ju,

    1. The Center for Musculoskeletal Research, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    2. Department of Pathology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Masahiko Takahata,

    1. The Center for Musculoskeletal Research, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    2. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Changyong Feng,

    1. Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Loralee A McMahon,

    1. Department of Pathology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • David G Hicks,

    1. Department of Pathology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Ben Panepento,

    1. Allergy/Immunology & Rheumatology Division, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Peter C Keng,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
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  • Christopher T Ritchlin

    Corresponding author
    1. Allergy/Immunology & Rheumatology Division, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    2. The Center for Musculoskeletal Research, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
    • Allergy/Immunology & Rheumatology Division, Box 695, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
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Abstract

Osteoclasts (OC) are bone-resorbing, multinucleated cells that are generated via fusion of OC precursors (OCP). The frequency of OCP is elevated in patients with erosive inflammatory arthritis and metabolic bone diseases. Although many cytokines and cell surface receptors are known to participate in osteoclastogenesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of this cellular transformation are poorly understood. Herein, we focused our studies on the dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), a seven-pass transmembrane receptor-like protein known to be essential for cell-to-cell fusion during osteoclastogenesis. We identified an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in the cytoplasmic tail of DC-STAMP, and developed an anti-DC-STAMP monoclonal antibody 1A2 that detected DC-STAMP expression on human tumor giant cells, blocked OC formation in vitro, and distinguished four patterns of human PBMC with a positive correlation to OC potential. In freshly isolated monocytes, DC-STAMPhigh cells produced a higher number of OC in culture than DC-STAMPlow cells and the surface expression of DC-STAMP gradually declined during osteoclastogenesis. Importantly, we showed that DC-STAMP is phosphorylated on its tyrosine residues and physically interacts with SHP-1 and CD16, an SH2-domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase and an ITAM-associated protein, respectively. Taken together, these data show that DC-STAMP is a potential OCP biomarker in inflammatory arthritis. Moreover, in addition to its effect on cell fusion, DC-STAMP dynamically regulates cell signaling during osteoclastogenesis. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

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