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Studies on the Toxic Interaction Mechanism between 2-Naphthylamine and Herring Sperm DNA

Authors

  • Jingjing Lin,

    1. The State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian, People's Republic of China
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  • Yan Liu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Material of Tianjin, Tianjin, People's Republic of China
    • The State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian, People's Republic of China
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  • Lingrong Liu,

    1. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Material of Tianjin, Tianjin, People's Republic of China
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  • Ling Song

    Corresponding author
    • The State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian, People's Republic of China
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  • Contract Grant Sponsor: National Basic Research Program of China.

  • Contract Grant Number: 2010CB933501.

  • Contract Grant Sponsor: State Key Lab of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research Project on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  • Contract Grant Sponsor: Opening Research Foundation of Key Laboratory of Biomedical Material in Tianjin city.

Correspondence to: Yan Liu and Ling Song.

ABSTRACT

The toxic interaction between 2-naphthylamine (2-NA) and herring sperm deoxyribonucleic acid (hs-DNA) has been thoroughly investigated by UV absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. UV absorption result indicates that 2-NA may intercalate into the stack base pairs of DNA during the toxic interaction of 2-NA with DNA. A fluorescence quenching study shows that DNA quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of 2-NA via a static pathway. The studies on effects of ionic strength and anionic quenching rule out electrostatic and groove bindings as the dominant binding modes. Further studies on denatured DNA fluorescence quenching and thermal melting studies confirm that the dominant binding mode of 2-NA-DNA is intercalative binding. A CD spectral study shows that the binding interaction of 2-NA with DNA leads to the disorganization of the neat double-helical structure of hs-DNA. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J BiochemMol Toxicol 27:279-285, 2013; View this article online at wileyonlinelibrary.com. DOI 10.1002/jbt.21488

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