Intermittent heterochronic plasma exchange as a modality for delaying cellular senescence—A hypothesis

Authors

  • Dobri D. Kiprov

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Immunotherapy, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California
    2. Apheresis Care Group and Fresenius Medical Care, San Francisco, California
    • Correspondence to: Dobri D. Kiprov, M.D. H.P., Chief, Division of Immunotherapy, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA and Medical Director, Apheresis Care Group and Fresenius Medical Care, San Francisco, 1700 California Street, #350, San Francisco, CA 94109, USA. E-mail: dkiprovcai@aol.com

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Abstract

The population of baby boomers (age 60–65) is rapidly increasing globally. The aging of the human body is associated with the decline of cellular function which leads to the development of a variety of diseases. The increased demand for health care for the aging population creates significant financial burden to any healthcare system. Developing strategies and health intervention methods to ameliorate this situation is paramount. Experiments utilizing heterochronic parabiosis in mice have demonstrated that replacing the aging cellular milieu with the plasma of a young experimental animal leads to reversal of cellular senescence. This article describes a hypothetical model of intermittent heterochronic plasma exchange in humans as a modality for heterochronic parabiosis in an attempt to delay cellular senescence. J. Clin. Apheresis, 28:387–389, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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