Cost-effectiveness of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization strategies including plerixafor in multiple myeloma and lymphoma patients

Authors

  • Aleš Tichopád,

    1. CEEOR—Central and Eastern European Outcomes Research, Prague, Czech Republic
    2. Department of Immunology Methods, Medical School and Teaching Hospital in Pilsen, Czech Republic
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  • Veronika Vítová,

    1. CEEOR—Central and Eastern European Outcomes Research, Prague, Czech Republic
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  • Zdeněk Kořístek,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Hematology and Oncology, Masaryk University Hospital Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Daniel Lysák

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Hematology and Oncology, Medical School and Teaching Hospital in Pilsen, Czech Republic
    • Correspondence to: Daniel Lysák, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Medical School and Teaching Hospital in Pilsen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Pilsen, Czech Republic. E-mail: lysak@fnplzen.cz

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  • This article was published online on 7 August 2013. It was subsequently identified that the authors' first names and surnames were transposed. This notice is included in the online version to indicate that the names have since been corrected in print and online.

Abstract

Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) are preferred source of hematopoietic stem cells for autologous transplantation. Mobilization of PBSCs using chemotherapy and/or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) however fails in around 20%. Combining G-CSF with plerixafor increases the mobilizations success. We compared cost-effectiveness of following schemes: the use of plerixafor “on demand” (POD) during the first mobilization in all patients with inadequate response, the remobilization with plerixafor following failure of the first standard mobilization (SSP), and the standard (re)mobilization scheme without plerixafor (SSNP). Decision tree models populated with data from a first-of-a-kind patient registry in six Czech centers (n = 93) were built to compare clinical benefits and direct costs from the payer's perspective. The success rates and costs for POD, SSP and SSNP mobilizations were; 94.9%, $7,197; 94.7%, $8,049; 84.7%, $5,991, respectively. The direct cost per successfully treated patient was $7,586, $8,501, and $7,077, respectively. The cost of re-mobilization of a poor mobilizer was $5,808 with G-CSF only and $16,755 if plerixafor was added. The total cost of plerixafor “on-demand” in the sub-cohort of poor mobilizers was $17,120. Generally, plerixafor improves the mobilization success by 10% and allows an additional patient to be successfully mobilized for incremental $11,803. Plerixafor is better and cheaper if used “on demand” than within a subsequent remobilization. J. Clin. Apheresis 28:395–403, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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