Prevalent mutations in prostate cancer

Authors

  • Jin-Tang Dong

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Hematology and Oncology, and Urology, Winship Cancer Institute, Program in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
    • Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, 1365-C Clifton Road, Room C4080, Atlanta, Georgia 30322.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Quantitative and structural genetic alterations cause the development and progression of prostate cancer. A number of genes have been implicated in prostate cancer by genetic alterations and functional consequences of the genetic alterations. These include the ELAC2 (HPC2), MSR1, and RNASEL (HPC1) genes that have germline mutations in familial prostate cancer; AR, ATBF1, EPHB2 (ERK), KLF6, mitochondria DNA, p53, PTEN, and RAS that have somatic mutations in sporadic prostate cancer; AR, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 (RAD53), CYP17, CYP1B1, CYP3A4, GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, PON1, SRD5A2, and VDR that have germline genetic variants associated with either hereditary and/or sporadic prostate cancer; and ANXA7 (ANX7), KLF5, NKX3-1 (NKX3.1), CDKN1B (p27), and MYC that have genomic copy number changes affecting gene function. More genes relevant to prostate cancer remain to be identified in each of these gene groups. For the genes that have been identified, most need additional genetic, functional, and/or biochemical examination. Identification and characterization of these genes will be a key step for improving the detection and treatment of prostate cancer. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary