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Journal of Cellular Biochemistry

HIFs, angiogenesis, and cancer

Authors

  • Yongzhi Yang,

    1. Student Teams Research Management Unit, Second Military Medical University, Xiangyin Road, Shanghai 200433, P.R. China
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Mingjuan Sun,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Second Military Medical University, Xiangyin Road, Shanghai 200433, P.R. China
    • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Second Military Medical University, 800, Xiangyin Road, Shanghai 200433, P.R. China.
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Lianghua Wang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Second Military Medical University, Xiangyin Road, Shanghai 200433, P.R. China
    • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Second Military Medical University, 800, Xiangyin Road, Shanghai 200433, P.R. China.
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  • Binghua Jiao

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Second Military Medical University, Xiangyin Road, Shanghai 200433, P.R. China
    • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Second Military Medical University, 800, Xiangyin Road, Shanghai 200433, P.R. China.
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Abstract

Tumor hypoxia was first described in the 1950s by radiation oncologists as a frequent cause of failure to radiotherapy in solid tumors. Today, it is evident that tumor hypoxia is a common feature of many cancers and the master regulator of hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), regulates multiple aspects of tumorigenesis, including angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, metastasis, differentiation, and response to radiation therapy. Although the tumor hypoxia response mechanism leads to a multitude of downstream effects, it is angiogenesis that is most crucial and also most susceptible to molecular manipulation. The delineation of molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis has revealed a critical role for HIF-1 in the regulation of angiogenic growth factors. In this article, we review what has been described about HIF-1: its structure, its regulation, and its implication for cancer therapy and we focus on its role in angiogenesis and cancer. J. Cell. Biochem. 114: 967–974, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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