Advertisement

Erythropoietin supports the survival of prostate cancer, but not growth and bone metastasis

Authors

  • Yusuke Shiozawa,

    1. Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Samantha McGee,

    1. Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michael J. Pienta,

    1. Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    2. Departments of Urology and Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Natalie McGregor,

    1. Departments of Urology and Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Younghun Jung,

    1. Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kenji Yumoto,

    1. Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jingcheng Wang,

    1. Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Janice E. Berry,

    1. Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kenneth J. Pienta,

    1. Departments of Urology and Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Current affiliation:
    1. Departments of Urology, Oncology, and Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Russell S. Taichman

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Conflict of interest: None.

Correspondence to: Russell S. Taichman, D.M.D., D.M.Sc., Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Room 3307, 1011 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1078.

E-mail: rtaich@umich.edu

Abstract

Erythropoietin (Epo) is used in clinical settings to enhance hematopoietic function and to improve the quality of life for patients undergoing chemotherapy by reducing fatigue and the need for transfusions. However, several meta-analyses have revealed that Epo treatments are associated with an increased risk of mortality in cancer patients. In this study, we examined the role of Epo in prostate cancer (PCa) progression, using in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo bone metastatic assays. We found that Epo did not stimulate the proliferation of PCa cell lines, but did protect PCa cells from apoptosis. In animal models of PCa metastasis, no evidence was found to support the hypothesis that Epo enhances metastasis. Together, these findings suggest that Epo may be useful for treating severe anemia in PCa patients without increasing metastatic risk. J. Cell. Biochem. 114: 2471–2478, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Ancillary