Journal of Cellular Biochemistry

Cover image for Vol. 117 Issue 9

September 2016

Volume 117, Issue 9

Pages i–i, 1965–2193

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. Prospects
    5. Articles
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      Cover Image, Volume 117, Number 9, September 2016 (page i)

      Babajan Banaganapalli, Kaleemuddin Mohammed, Imran Ali Khan, Jumana Y. Al-Aama, Ramu Elango and Noor Ahmad Shaik

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25647

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      Cover: The cover image, by Noor Ahmad Shaik et al., is based on the Article A Computational Protein Phenotype Prediction Approach to Analyze the Deleterious Mutations of Human MED12 Gene, DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25499.

  2. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. Prospects
    5. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Prospects

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. Prospects
    5. Articles
    1. The Tyrosine Kinome Dictates Breast Cancer Heterogeneity and Therapeutic Responsiveness (pages 1971–1990)

      Jacqueline R. Ha, Peter M. Siegel and Josie Ursini-Siegel

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25561

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      This article provides a comprehensive review of the current state of literature that supports an essential role for altered tyrosine kinase signaling in promoting the emergence of distinct breast cancer subtypes, heterogeneity within subtypes, and the eventual emergence of resistance to targeted therapies that are either the standard of care or in clinical trials. It integrates recent literature on how integrating signals downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases, cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, adaptor proteins, and protein tyrosine phosphatases converge to increase the complexity of the tyrosine kinome in breast cancer development, progression to metastatic disease, and the emergence of therapeutic resistance.

  4. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. Prospects
    5. Articles
    1. FGFR Inhibitor Ameliorates Hypophosphatemia and Impaired Engrailed-1/Wnt Signaling in FGF2 High Molecular Weight Isoform Transgenic Mice (pages 1991–2000)

      Erxia Du, Liping Xiao and Marja M. Hurley

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25493

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      This study examined the effect of short-term blocking of FGFRs using NVP-BGJ398 on phosphate homeostasis in kidneys of FGF2 high molecular weight isoform transgenic mice. FGFR inhibitor ameliorates hypophosphatemia and impaired Engrailed-1/Wnt signaling in HMWTg mice.

    2. Transcription Factors and Medium Suitable for Initiating the Differentiation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to the Hepatocyte Lineage (pages 2001–2009)

      Minoru Tomizawa, Fuminobu Shinozaki, Yasufumi Motoyoshi, Takao Sugiyama, Shigenori Yamamoto and Naoki Ishige

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25494

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      Liver-specific transcription factors initiated differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells to hepatocyte lineage in William's E medium.

    3. PPARγ Represses Apolipoprotein A-I Gene but Impedes TNFα-Mediated ApoA-I Downregulation in HepG2 Cells (pages 2010–2022)

      Vladimir S. Shavva, Denis A. Mogilenko, Alexandra M. Bogomolova, Artemy A. Nikitin, Ella B. Dizhe, Alexander M. Efremov, Galina N. Oleinikova, Andrej P. Perevozchikov and Sergey V. Orlov

      Version of Record online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25498

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      PPARgamma agonist GW1929 negatively regulates apoA-I mRNA transcription and ApoA-I protein secretion in PPARgamma-dependent manner, and these effects are mediated by both direct interaction of PPARgamma with the hepatic enhancer of apoA-I gene and PPARgamma-dependent change in the levels of LXRbeta and PPARalpha binding with the hepatic enhancer of apoA-I gene. Activation of PPARgamma by GW1929 interferes with TNFalpha-mediated suppression of apoA-I transcription but does not alter TNFalpha-mediated inhibition of ApoA-I secretion by HepG2 cells.

    4. A Computational Protein Phenotype Prediction Approach to Analyze the Deleterious Mutations of Human MED12 Gene (pages 2023–2035)

      Babajan Banaganapalli, Kaleemuddin Mohammed, Imran Ali Khan, Jumana Y. Al-Aama, Ramu Elango and Noor Ahmad Shaik

      Version of Record online: 10 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25499

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      Computational methods as a primary filter to verify the plausible impact of pathogenic mutations based on the perspective of evolution, expression, and phenotype of proteins.

    5. Modulation of the Isoprenoid/Cholesterol Biosynthetic Pathway During Neuronal Differentiation In Vitro (pages 2036–2044)

      Veronica Cartocci, Marco Segatto, Ilenia Di Tunno, Stefano Leone, Frank W. Pfrieger and Valentina Pallottini

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25500

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      During neuronal differentiation the activity of the MVA pathway decreases.Pharmacologic inhibition of HMGR by simvastatin accelerated neuronal differentiation by modulating geranylated proteins.MVA pathway appears as an attractive pharmacological target to modulate neurological and metabolic symptoms of developmental neuropathologies.

    6. Human Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Induces Tumoricidal Effects on Lymphoma Cells Through Hydrogen Peroxide Mediation (pages 2045–2055)

      Hao Daniel Lin, Chui-Yee Fong, Arijit Biswas, Mahesh Choolani and Ariff Bongso

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25501

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      Several groups have reported that human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) possess unique tumoricidal properties against many ancers. We report that the 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate of hWJSC-conditioned medium inhibits the rowth of lymphoma cells and the tumoricidal effect was mediated via hydrogen peroxide signaling. The hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate may thus be a promising anti-lymphoma agent.

    7. Novel Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 8 Isoform Is Essential for Cell Proliferation (pages 2056–2066)

      Sarah Hernandez and Tanja Dominko

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25508

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      Increased expression of PRMT8 methyltransferase is associated with increased plasticity of human fibroblasts and with human embryonic stem cells. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown, we demonstrated that this novel variant was required for proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and grade IV glioblastomas. PRMT8 upregulation in a non-tumorigenic system may offer a potential diagnostic biomarker and a therapeutic target for cells in pre-cancerous and cancerous states.

    8. Arctigenin Inhibits Adipogenesis by Inducing AMPK Activation and Reduces Weight Gain in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice (pages 2067–2077)

      Yo-Han Han, Ji-Ye Kee, Jinbong Park, Hye-Lin Kim, Mi-Young Jeong, Dae-Seung Kim, Yong-Deok Jeon, Yunu Jung, Dong-Hyun Youn, JongWook Kang, Hong-Seob So, Raekil Park, Jong-Hyun Lee, Soyoung Shin, Su-Jin Kim, Jae-Young Um and Seung-Heon Hong

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25509

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      ARC induced the AMPK activation resulting in down-modulation of adipogenesis-related factors including PPARγ, C/EBPα, fatty acid synthase, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase. This study demonstrates that ARC can reduce key adipogenic factors by activating the AMPK in vitro and in vivo.

    9. Nitric Oxide Prevents Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Through Regulation of Gene Expression, Cell Signaling, and Control of Cell Proliferation (pages 2078–2088)

      Rafael Tapia-Limonchi, Gladys M. Cahuana, Estefania Caballano-Infantes, Carmen Salguero-Aranda, Amparo Beltran-Povea, Ana B. Hitos, Abdelkrim Hmadcha, Franz Martin, Bernat Soria, Francisco J. Bedoya and Juan R. Tejedo

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25513

    10. Effects of the Histamine 1 Receptor Antagonist Cetirizine on the Osteoporotic Phenotype in H+/K+ATPase Beta Subunit KO Mice (pages 2089–2096)

      Kristin M. Aasarød, Astrid K. Stunes, Mats P. Mosti, Masoud Ramezanzadehkoldeh, Bjørn I. Viggaklev, Janne E. Reseland, Bjørn H. Skallerud, Reidar Fossmark and Unni Syversen

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25514

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      Epidemiological studies have shown increased fracture risk in individuals with gastric anacidity. Low gastric acid levels result in elevated gastrin and subsequent stimulation of gastric histamine release. In a mouse model of gastric anacidity, we find no improvement of bone quality after histamine 1 receptor administration.

    11. 3, 3′, 5-triiodo-L-thyronine Increases In Vitro Chondrogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Human Umbilical Cord Stroma Through SRC2 (pages 2097–2108)

      Pablo Fernández-Pernas, Juan Fafián-Labora, Iván Lesende-Rodriguez, Jesús Mateos, Alexandre De la Fuente, Isaac Fuentes, Javier De Toro Santos, Fco. Blanco García and María C. Arufe

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25515

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      This work demonstrates, for first time, that T3 promotes differentiation towards chondrocytes-like cells in our in vitro model, that this differentiation is mediated by steroid receptor co-activator 2 (SRC2) and does not induce hypertrophy.

    12. Yeast Two-Hybrid and One-Hybrid Screenings Identify Regulators of hsp70 Gene Expression (pages 2109–2117)

      Youhei Saito, Takanobu Nakagawa, Ayana Kakihana, Yoshia Nakamura, Tomomi Nabika, Michihiro Kasai, Mai Takamori, Nobuyuki Yamagishi, Takahisa Kuga, Takumi Hatayama and Yuji Nakayama

      Version of Record online: 10 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25517

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      In the present study, two methods including yeast two-hybrid and one-hybrid systems were used to search for regulators of hsp70 gene expression. We identified several Hsp105β or hsp70 promoter-binding proteins and found that three of these proteins (the transcriptional co-activator AF9, splicing mediator SNRPE, and coiled-coil domain-containing protein CCDC127) affected the activation of hsp70 promoter.

    13. CAV1 Prevents Gallbladder Cholesterol Crystallization by Regulating Biosynthesis and Transport of Bile Salts (pages 2118–2127)

      Guoqiang Xu, Yiqiao Li, Xin Jiang and Hongtan Chen

      Version of Record online: 29 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25518

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      Loss of CAV1 sensitized mice to CGD. Effects of CAV1 depletion on the expression of cholesterol and LXR-responsive gene expression profile involved in hepatic homeostasis. And ERK/AP-1/FXR axis is necessary for the litho-preventive function of CAV1.

    14. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Regulates High Mobility Group A2 Expression in Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (pages 2128–2137)

      Stefanos Kalomoiris, Andrew C. Cicchetto, Kinga Lakatos, Jan A. Nolta and Fernando A. Fierro

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25519

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      We found that during early expansion of MSCs, expression of HMGA2 is quickly reduced. However, supplementation with FGF-2 increases HMGA2 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner.

    15. Simulated Microgravity Promotes Cell Apoptosis Through Suppressing Uev1A/TICAM/TRAF/NF-κB-Regulated Anti-Apoptosis and p53/PCNA- and ATM/ATR-Chk1/2-Controlled DNA-Damage Response Pathways (pages 2138–2148)

      Tuo Zhao, Xin Tang, Channakeshava Sokke Umeshappa, Hong Ma, Haijun Gao, Yulin Deng, Andrew Freywald and Jim Xiang

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25520

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      Microgravity has been known to induce cell death. However, its underlying mechanism is less studied. Our work reveals that SMG promotes the apoptotic response through a combined modulation of the Uev1A/TICAM/TRAF/NF-κB-regulated apoptosis and the p53/PCNA- and ATM/ATR-Chk1/2-controlled DNA-damage response pathways.

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      γ-Secretase Dependent Nuclear Targeting of Dystroglycan (pages 2149–2157)

      Daniel Leocadio, Andrew Mitchell and Steve J. Winder

      Version of Record online: 31 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25537

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      We have used LNCaP prostate cancer cells as a model system to investigate proteases and tyrosine phosphorylation affecting β-dystroglycan proteolysis and nuclear targeting. Our data support a cell density-dependent γ-secretase and furin mediated proteolysis of β-dystroglycan, which could be notch stimulated, leading to nuclear targeting and subsequent degradation.

    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Biotechnological Chondroitin a Novel Glycosamminoglycan With Remarkable Biological Function on Human Primary Chondrocytes (pages 2158–2169)

      Antonietta Stellavato, Virginia Tirino, Francesca de Novellis, Antonella Della Vecchia, Fabio Cinquegrani, Mario De Rosa, Gianpaolo Papaccio and Chiara Schiraldi

      Version of Record online: 11 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25556

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      Recently, we produced biotechnolgical unsulfated chindroitin by fermentation, and purified this polymer to pharmaceutical grade. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate and compare the effects of new biotechnological chondroitin (BC) and a commercial extractive chondroitin sulfate (CS) on human chondrocytes in vitro culture; (ii) to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of the innovative BC compared to extractive CS. Biotechnological chondroitin proved superior to the extractive sulfated one in our in vitro model.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      ACTH Modulates PTP-PEST Activity and Promotes Its Interaction With Paxillin (pages 2170–2181)

      Alejandra Beatriz Gorostizaga, M. Mercedes Mori Sequeiros Garcia, Andrea B. Acquier, Juan J. Lopez-Costa, Carlos F. Mendez, Paula M. Maloberti and Cristina Paz

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25566

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      PTP-PEST is expressed in adrenal tissue and adrenocortical cells. PTP-PEST activity is modulated by ACTH/PKA. ACTH modulates paxillin–PTP–PEST interaction.

    19. Lipid Profiling of In Vitro Cell Models of Adipogenic Differentiation: Relationships With Mouse Adipose Tissues (pages 2182–2193)

      Lucy Liaw, Igor Prudovsky, Robert A. Koza, Rea V. Anunciado-Koza, Matthew E. Siviski, Volkhard Lindner, Robert E. Friesel, Clifford J. Rosen, Paul R. S. Baker, Brigitte Simons and Calvin P. H. Vary

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25522

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      Our objective was to characterize lipid profiles in cell models of adipocyte differentiation in comparison to mouse adipose tissues in vivo. A novel lipid extraction strategy was combined with global lipid profiling using direct infusion and sequential precursor ion fragmentation, termed MS/MSALL. Potential new lipid biomarkers representing tissue-specific contributions to adipogenesis were revealed, thus providing a foundation for using in vitro models of adipogenesis to reflect potential changes in adipose tissues in vivo.

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