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Atomic charges, dipole moments, and Fukui functions using the Hirshfeld partitioning of the electron density

Authors

  • F. De Proft,

    1. Eenheid Algemene Chemie (ALGC), Free University of Brussels (VUB), Faculteit Wetenschappen, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium
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  • C. Van Alsenoy,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp (UIA), Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerpen, Belgium
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  • A. Peeters,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp (UIA), Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerpen, Belgium
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  • W. Langenaeker,

    1. Department of Molecular Design and Chemoinformatics, Janssen Research Foundation, Turnhoutseweg 30, B-2340 Beerse, Belgium
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  • P. Geerlings

    Corresponding author
    1. Eenheid Algemene Chemie (ALGC), Free University of Brussels (VUB), Faculteit Wetenschappen, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium
    • Eenheid Algemene Chemie (ALGC), Free University of Brussels (VUB), Faculteit Wetenschappen, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium
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Abstract

In the Hirshfeld partitioning of the electron density, the molecular electron density is decomposed in atomic contributions, proportional to the weight of the isolated atom density in the promolecule density, constructed by superimposing the isolated atom electron densities placed on the positions the atoms have in the molecule. A maximal conservation of the information of the isolated atoms in the atoms-in-molecules is thereby secured. Atomic charges, atomic dipole moments, and Fukui functions resulting from the Hirshfeld partitioning of the electron density are computed for a large series of molecules. In a representative set of organic and hypervalent molecules, they are compared with other commonly used population analysis methods. The expected bond polarities are recovered, but the charges are much smaller compared to other methods. Condensed Fukui functions for a large number of molecules, undergoing an electrophilic or a nucleophilic attack, are computed and compared with the HOMO and LUMO densities, integrated over the Hirshfeld atoms in molecules. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem 12: 1198–1209, 2002

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