Software news and updates electronegativity equalization method: Parameterization and validation for organic molecules using the Merz-Kollman-Singh charge distribution scheme

Authors

  • Zuzana Jiroušková,

    1. National Centre for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of, Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Radka Svobodová Vařeková,

    1. National Centre for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of, Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Jakub Vaněk,

    1. National Centre for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of, Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Jaroslav Koča

    Corresponding author
    1. National Centre for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of, Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
    • National Centre for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of, Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
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Abstract

The electronegativity equalization method (EEM) was developed by Mortier et al. as a semiempirical method based on the density-functional theory. After parameterization, in which EEM parameters Ai, Bi, and adjusting factor κ are obtained, this approach can be used for calculation of average electronegativity and charge distribution in a molecule. The aim of this work is to perform the EEM parameterization using the Merz-Kollman-Singh (MK) charge distribution scheme obtained from B3LYP/6-31G* and HF/6-31G* calculations. To achieve this goal, we selected a set of 380 organic molecules from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and used the methodology, which was recently successfully applied to EEM parameterization to calculate the HF/STO-3G Mulliken charges on large sets of molecules. In the case of B3LYP/6-31G* MK charges, we have improved the EEM parameters for already parameterized elements, specifically C, H, N, O, and F. Moreover, EEM parameters for S, Br, Cl, and Zn, which have not as yet been parameterized for this level of theory and basis set, we also developed. In the case of HF/6-31G* MK charges, we have developed the EEM parameters for C, H, N, O, S, Br, Cl, F, and Zn that have not been parameterized for this level of theory and basis set so far. The obtained EEM parameters were verified by a previously developed validation procedure and used for the charge calculation on a different set of 116 organic molecules from the CSD. The calculated EEM charges are in a very good agreement with the quantum mechanically obtained ab initio charges. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2009

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