Presenting problems among treatment-seeking gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth

Authors

  • Trevor A. Hart,

    Corresponding author
    1. Temple University
    • Correspondence and requests for reprints should be sent to: Trevor A. Hart or Richard G. Heimberg, Adult Anxiety Clinic of Temple, Department of Psychology, Weiss Hall, Temple University, 1701 North 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122–6085; e-mail: tahart@nimbus.ocis.temple.edu or rheimber@nimbus.ocis.temple.edu.
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  • Richard G. Heimberg

    Corresponding author
    1. Temple University
    • Correspondence and requests for reprints should be sent to: Trevor A. Hart or Richard G. Heimberg, Adult Anxiety Clinic of Temple, Department of Psychology, Weiss Hall, Temple University, 1701 North 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122–6085; e-mail: tahart@nimbus.ocis.temple.edu or rheimber@nimbus.ocis.temple.edu.
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Abstract

Gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth are at risk for a variety of clinical problems amenable to psychotherapeutic intervention. However, many psychotherapists may be unaware of the difficulties faced by this population. The purpose of this article is to familiarize therapists with presenting complaints common to psychotherapy-seeking gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth. Some of these problems include homophobia among family, peers, and authority figures (often expressed at school or at work), depression, suicidality, social anxiety, and body image disturbance. We illustrate these important issues via four case examples. © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Clin Psychol/In Session 57: 615–627, 2001.

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