Treatment satisfaction, perceived treatment effectiveness, and dropout among older users of mental health services

Authors


  • This research was a portion of the first author's doctoral thesis, conducted under the guidance of the second author. Research was conducted at the Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba. Although the research and analysis are based on data from Statistics Canada, the opinions expressed do not represent the views of Statistics Canada. Tiffany Lippens was supported by a graduate fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and a Research Data Centre Graduate Student Award. Corey Mackenzie is supported by a Manitoba Health Research Council Establishment Grant. We thank dissertation examining committee members, John Cairney, Daniel Bailis, Judith Chipperfield, and Jitender Sareen, for their helpful suggestions. We also thank Ian Clara of the Research Data Centre for his valuable input.

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the rates and correlates of treatment satisfaction, perceived treatment effectiveness, and dropout among older users of mental health services. Method: We used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health and Well-Being (CCHS-1.2), which includes 12,792 individuals aged ≥55 years. The average age of these participants was 67 years and 53.2% were female. We examined the rates of treatment satisfaction, perceived treatment effectiveness, and dropout for those who had used mental health services in the past year, and used logistic regression to examine the correlates of these outcomes. Results: Of the older adults included in the CCHS-1.2, 664 (5.3%) had used mental health services in the past year. The majority of these were satisfied with services (88.5%) and perceived treatment to be effective (83.6%), which is likely why only 15.5% dropped out in the past year. In logistic regression models, social support was significantly and positively related to both treatment satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Perceived treatment effectiveness was the only variable related to dropout, with lower levels of perceived effectiveness associated with greater odds of dropping out of treatment. Conclusions: Results from this study indicate that older adults have very good self-reported treatment outcomes. The modest influence of individual characteristics on treatment outcomes suggests the potential importance of contextual characteristics. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol 67:1197–1209, 2011.

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