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COMMUNITY VIOLENCE EXPOSURE AND ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE USE: DOES MONITORING AND POSITIVE PARENTING MODERATE RISK IN URBAN COMMUNITIES?

Authors

  • Rosalyn Lee

    Corresponding author
    • Division of Violence Prevention, National Center on Injury Prevention and Control, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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  • The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  • Data collection for this project was supported by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention contract #200-2002-F-00762 to ORC Macro International.

  • The author would like to acknowledge the team that contributed to the planning and implementation of the study, ORC Macro International, CDC and Battelle; the school district for their enthusiasm and logistical support; and the students for their time and willingness to participate in the study.

Correspondence to: Dr. Rosalyn Lee, CDC/NCIPC/DVP, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, MS F64, Atlanta, Georgia 30341. E-mail: rdl3@cdc.gov

Abstract

This study investigates whether monitoring and positive parenting moderate the relationship between community violence exposure (CVE) and youth substance use. Analyses utilized a subsample (N = 2197) of a cross-sectional, ethnically diverse, urban school district sample. Dependent variables were any past year alcohol or drug use (AOD) and binge drinking. Independent variables were CVE, perceptions of parental monitoring, and positive parenting. Sixty-four percent of the sample witnessed beatings, 16.5% witnessed stabbings or shootings; 45% and 19.5% reported AOD consumption and binge drinking, respectively. After controlling for confounders, logistic regression models indicated that CVE was significantly and positively related to AOD and binge drinking. Parental monitoring was inversely related to AOD and binge drinking. Significant interactions between CVE and parenting variables were not found. Additional research is needed to identify factors at multiple levels of the social ecology that buffer the impact of community violence on adolescent substance use.

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