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SELF-STIGMA AND QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS WHO RECEIVE COMPULSORY COMMUNITY TREATMENT SERVICES

Authors


Correspondence to: Dr. James Livingston, 70 Colony Farm Road, Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada, V3C5X9. E-mail: jlivingston@forensic.bc.ca

Abstract

The present study was designed to examine the relationship between self-stigma and quality of life over a one year time period for 71 people with mental illness who were receiving compulsory community mental health treatment. It was hypothesized that, over time, self-stigma would have the direct effect of eroding quality of life among people with mental illness who were receiving compulsory community treatment; however, this relationship was not confirmed by the data. Although the cross-sectional analyses revealed a moderate, negative relationship between self-stigma and quality of life, the longitudinal analyses indicated that self-stigma was not a significant predictor of quality of life. Among the variables measured in the current study, psychiatric symptom severity was the strongest predictor of quality of life.

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