INFORMAL SOCIAL CONTROL OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN: RESULTS FROM A CONCEPT MAPPING STUDY OF URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS

Authors


  • This analysis was supported by a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) National Institutes of Health career development award to Victoria Frye (DA-K01-020774).

  • The authors have no competing interests.

  • We thank the research participants for their effort in this study.

Please address correspondence to: Victoria Frye, Laboratory of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, 310 E 67th St, New York, New York. E-mail: vfrye@nybloodcenter.org.

Abstract

How the neighborhood environment relates to intimate partner violence against women has been studied using theories applied originally to general violence. Extending social disorganization and collective efficacy theories, they apply a traditional measure informal social control that does not reflect behaviors specific to partner violence. We conducted a concept mapping study in two New York City neighborhoods, to understand what behaviors neighborhood residents might enact to prevent partner violence and how feasible and effective residents believed them to be. Results revealed a range of “preventive intervention behaviors.” Cluster analysis revealed that these behaviors grouped into four general areas, corresponding to the victim, perpetrator, community, and formal systems. Preventive intervention behaviors rated by participants as most feasible focused on the victim, whereas those rated most effective involved formal systems. Results have theoretical and practical implications for future research and programs to engage neighbors and neighborhoods in intimate partner violence prevention.

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