RESIDENT WELL-BEING, COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS, AND NEIGHBOURHOOD PERCEPTIONS, PRIDE, AND OPPORTUNITIES AMONG DISADVANTAGE METROPOLITAN AND REGIONAL COMMUNITIES: EVIDENCE FROM THE NEIGHBOURHOOD RENEWAL PROJECT

Authors


  • We acknowledge the support of the Department of Human Services in granting access to the dataset and extracting the relevant data for analysis. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Human Services.

Please address correspondence to: André M.N. Renzaho, Burnet Building, 89 Commercial Road, Melbourne Vic 3004 Australia. E-mail: andre.renzaho@monash.edu

Abstract

The current study aims investigate the relationship between participants’ neighbourhood perceptions and social capital and resident well-being using data from the Neighbourhood Renewal Project (NRP; n = 7855). Resident well-being was positively associated with the quality of the physical environment and safety of the neighbourhood, but negatively associated with government trustworthiness and community connections. Life satisfaction had a positive relationship with community connections, resident well-being, as well as quality of community services and safety. We conclude that free or low-cost opportunities to engage and connect with neighbours through participation in activities such as sporting groups, volunteer organizations, and leisure/hobby groups may increase life satisfaction of individuals in a neighbourhood, particularly for those living in low socioeconomic or stigmatized areas.

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