Interview with the retinoblastoma family members: Do they help each other?

Authors

  • Tiziana Tonini,

    1. Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Center for Biotechnology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    2. Istituto di Anatomia ed Istologia Patologica, Universita' degli Studi di Siena, Siena Italy
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  • Christina Hillson,

    1. Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Center for Biotechnology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Pier Paolo Claudio

    Corresponding author
    1. Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Center for Biotechnology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    2. Department of Scienze Odontostomatologiche e Maxillo-Facciali, University of Naples “Federico II,” Napoli, Italy
    • College of Science and Technology, Center for Biotechnology, Temple University, BioLife Science Building Suite 333, 1900 North 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122-6082.
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Abstract

The ultimate destiny of a cell to undergo division, differentiation, survival, and death results from an intricate balance between multiple regulators including oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and cell cycle associated proteins. Deregulation of the cell cycle machinery switches the phenotype from a normal cell to a cancerous cell. Fundamental alterations of tumor suppressor genes may result in an unregulated cell cycle with the accumulation of mutations and eventual neoplastic transformation. As such, one may define cancer as a genetic disease of the cell cycle. In this review, we will emphasize our current understanding of how the cell cycle machinery maintains cellular homeostasis by studying the consequences of its deregulation. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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