Serial propagation of human ovarian surface epithelium in tissue culture

Authors

  • Craig H. Siemens,

    1. Department of Anatomy, The University of British Columbia, 2177 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1W5
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  • Nelly Auersperg

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anatomy, The University of British Columbia, 2177 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1W5
    • Department of Anatomy, The University of British Columbia, 2177 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1W5
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Abstract

Most human ovarian cancers are thought to arise in the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). The precise role of OSE in carcinogenesis has not been defined because no appropriate animal models for the study of this tissue exist and culture of human OSE has been limited to primary outgrowths. In this report, we describe conditions for serial cultivation of normal human OSE. Premenopausal ovarian tissue was obtained at surgery. OSE growth was compared in media MCDB 202, 199 and Waymouth's 752/1 (WM) supplemented with 5, 15, or 25% fetal bovine serum (FBS), with/without 20 ng/ml epidermal growth factor (EGF) and 0.4 γg/ml hydrocortisone (HC). The rate and extent of OSE outgrowths from explants in primary culture were greatest in either WM or 199/202 (1:1), supplemented with 15% FBS/EGF/HC. In early passage cultures, cell proliferation was most rapid and extensive in 199/202 with 15% FBS, EGF, and HC. In this medium, OSE cells were subcultured up to 10 times and underwent 20–25 population doublings over 5 weeks. The population doubling time during rapid growth was approximately 48 h. Seeding efficiencies of up to 53% and cloning efficiencies of up to 13% were obtained. Early passage OSE cells reversibly modulated from a slow growing, epithelial, intensely keratin-positive form in 199/202 medium lacking EGF/HC, to a rapidly proliferating, elongate, less keratin-positive form in medium with EGF/HC. OSE cells grown in WM/5–15% FBS were epithelial and near-stationary. Thus, culture conditions have been defined for ovarian carcinogen assays requiring either proliferating or stationary cell populations, and for further studies of the role of OSE in ovarian biology.

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