Get access

Role of cyclic-AMP responsive element binding (CREB) proteins in cell proliferation in a rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma

Authors


Abstract

The role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is poorly understood in the regulation of normal and abnormal hepatic cell growth. In this study, we examined the regulation of intracellular cAMP levels and its effect on nuclear cAMP responsive elements (CREs) in a rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tumorigenic liver cells were cultured from an in vivo model of HCC and the role of cAMP in cell mitogenesis determined. These data demonstrated agents that elevate intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]i) levels caused significant dose-dependent inhibition of serum-stimulated mitogenesis in HCC cells. Cells were next analyzed for transcription factor expression and activity following increased [cAMP]i. These data demonstrated time- and dose-dependent increases in CRE binding protein (pCREB) activity, a maximal response occurring after 10–20 min before returning to basal levels within 60 min. In contrast, increased [cAMP]i levels led to sustained inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) II/IIγ mRNA and protein induction. To understand these data in relation to the in vivo setting, HCC tumors were analyzed and compared to pair-matched normal liver (NL) samples. These studies demonstrated significantly elevated Gsα-protein expression in HCC versus NL in the absence of significant changes in basal cAMP levels. Analysis of total and active CREB demonstrated significantly increased total CREB/pCREB in HCC versus NL. Further analysis of CRE expression demonstrated significantly increased expression of ICER mRNA and protein in HCC versus sham operated (Sh). These data demonstrate cAMP, while capable of stimulating promitogenic CREB activation inhibits cell mitogenesis in HCC possibly via ICER induction. J. Cell. Physiol. 206: 411–419, 2006. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary