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In vivo biodistribution of stem cells using molecular nuclear medicine imaging

Authors

  • Mick M. Welling,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Laboratories Leiden, Section Nuclear Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands
    • Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Laboratories Leiden, Section Nuclear Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, C4-R, Room 77, P.O. Box 9600. 2300 RC Leiden, the Netherlands.
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  • Marjolijn Duijvestein,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands
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  • Alberto Signore,

    1. Nuclear Medicine Unit, “Sapienza”, University of Roma, Rome, Italy
    2. Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre, Groningen, Netherlands
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  • Louise van der Weerd

    1. Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Laboratories Leiden, Section Nuclear Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands
    2. Department of Anatomy & Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands
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Abstract

Studies on stem cell are rapidly developing since these cells have great therapeutic potential for numerous diseases and has generated much promise as well as confusion due to contradictory results. Major questions in this research field have been raised as to how and in which numbers stem cells home to target tissues after administration, whether the cells engraft and differentiate, and what their long-term fate is. To answer these questions, reliable in vivo tracking techniques are essential. In vivo molecular imaging techniques using magnetic resonance imaging, bioluminescence, and scintigraphy have been applied for this purpose in experimental studies. The aim of this review is to discuss various radiolabeling techniques for early stem cell tracking, the need for validation of viability and performance of the cells after labeling, and the routes of administration in experimental animal models. In addition, we evaluate current problems and directions related to stem cell tracking using radiolabels, including a possible role for their clinical implementation. J. Cell. Physiol. 226: 1444–1452, 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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