Nickel removal characteristics of an immobilized macro fungus: equilibrium, kinetic and mechanism analysis of the biosorption

Authors

  • Tamer Akar,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480, Eskişehir, Turkey
      Tamer Akar, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480, Eskişehir, Turkey. E-mail: takar@ogu.edu.tr
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  • Sema Celik,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480, Eskişehir, Turkey
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  • Asli Gorgulu Ari,

    1. Department of Elementary Education, Faculty of Education, Yıldız Technical University, 34220, İstanbul, Turkey
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  • Sibel Tunali Akar

    1. Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480, Eskişehir, Turkey
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Tamer Akar, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480, Eskişehir, Turkey. E-mail: takar@ogu.edu.tr

Abstract

BACKGROUND: An immobilized new biosorbent was prepared from macro fungi Lactarius salmonicolor for the effective removal of nickel ions from aqueous media. Operating conditions were optimized as functions of initial pH, agitation time, sorbent amount and dynamic flow rate. Immobilization and biosorption mechanism were examined and the developed biosorbent was tested for the removal of nickel ions from real wastewater.

RESULTS: Biosorption performance of the biomass continuously increased in the pH range 2.0–8.0. The coverage of the biosorbent surface by silica gel resulted in a significant increase in biosorption yield of nickel ions. The highest nickel loading capacity was obtained as 114.44 mg g−1 using a relatively small amount of immobilized biosorbent. Biosorption equilibrium time was recorded as 5 min. Experimental data were analyzed by different isotherm and kinetic models. Infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive analysis confirmed the process. The sorbent exhibited relatively good recovery potential in dynamic flow mode studies. Biosorption capacity of immobilized biosorbent was noted as 14.90 mg g−1 in real wastewater.

CONCLUSION: Silica gel immobilized biomass of L. salmonicolor is to be a low cost and potential biosorbent with high biosorption capacity for the removal of contaminating nickel from aqueous media. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry

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