Fetal weight estimates in late pregnancy with emphasis on macrosomia

Authors

  • Joseph M. Miller Jr. MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of obstetrics and Gynecology, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, LSUMC, 1542 Tulane Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112
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  • Frederick A. Korndorffer III MD,

    1. Department of obstetrics and Gynecology, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana
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  • Harvey A. Gabert MD

    1. Department of obstetrics and Gynecology, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana
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Abstract

The effectiveness of three methods (Shepard et al,1 Hadlock et al,3 and Hansmann10) for estimating fetal weight was evaluated in 150 patients at greater than 36 weeks menstrual age. All infants were > 2,500 at birth. Only the method of Hadlock et al3 did not systematically underestimate birth weight. When separate weight subclasses (2,500 to 4,999 g) were examined, the method of Hadlock et al3 showed better consistency. All models, however, had significant underestimates for the largest subclasses, 4,000 to 4,999 g. The ability to predict the macrosomic infant (24,000 g) was only slightly better using the method of Hadlock et al3 than by the formula of Shephard et al.1

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