Laser-based in situ techniques: Novel methods for generating extreme conditions in TEM samples

Authors

  • Mitra L. Taheri,

    Corresponding author
    1. Chemistry, Materials, Earth & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
    • Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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  • Thomas Lagrange,

    1. Chemistry, Materials, Earth & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
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  • Bryan W. Reed,

    1. Chemistry, Materials, Earth & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
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  • Michael R. Armstrong,

    1. Chemistry, Materials, Earth & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
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  • Geoffrey H. Campbell,

    1. Chemistry, Materials, Earth & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
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  • William J. DeHope,

    1. Chemistry, Materials, Earth & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
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  • Judy S. Kim,

    1. Chemistry, Materials, Earth & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
    2. Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California
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  • Wayne E. King,

    1. Chemistry, Materials, Earth & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
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  • Daniel J. Masiel,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California
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  • Nigel D. Browning

    1. Chemistry, Materials, Earth & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
    2. Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California
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  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in public domain in the United States of America.

Abstract

The dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM as a new technique to process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated. Microsc. Res. Tech., 2009. Published 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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