Get access

Epidermal patterning in Arabidopsis: models make a difference

Authors

  • Mariana Benítez,

    1. Centro de Ciencias de la Complejidad (C3), Torre de Ingeniería, Ciudad Universitaria, DF, Mexico
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nicholas A.M. Monk,

    1. School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, United Kingdom
    2. Centre for Plant Integrative Biology, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Elena R. Alvarez-Buylla

    Corresponding author
    1. Centro de Ciencias de la Complejidad (C3), Torre de Ingeniería, Ciudad Universitaria, DF, Mexico
    2. Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria 3er Circuito Exterior, Junto Jardín Botánico Exterior, Coyoacán, DF, Mexico
    • Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria 3er Circuito Exterior, Junto Jardín Botánico Exterior, Coyoacán 04510, DF, Mexico
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The leaf and root epidermis in Arabidopsis provide ideal systems in which to explore the mechanisms that underlie the patterned assignment of cell fates during development. Extensive experimental studies have uncovered a complex interlocked feedback network that operates within the epidermis to coordinate the choice between hair and nonhair fates. A number of recent studies using mathematical models have begun to study this network, highlighting new mechanisms that have subsequently been confirmed in model-directed experiments. These studies illustrate the potential of integrated modeling and experimentation to shed new light on developmental processes. Moreover, these models enable systems-level comparative analyses that may help understand the origin and role of properties, such as robustness and redundancy in developmental systems and, concomitantly, the evolution of development itself. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 316:241–253, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary