Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics (1978–2012)

Cover image for Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics (1978–2012)

May 2011

Volume 116, Issue A5

Currently known as: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics

  1. Ionosphere and Upper Atmosphere

    1. Top of page
    2. Ionosphere and Upper Atmosphere
    3. Magnetospheric Physics
    4. Solar and Heliospheric Physics
    1. All-sky imaging observations of conjugate medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances in the American sector

      C. Martinis, J. Baumgardner, J. Wroten and M. Mendillo

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016264

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      Key Points

      • Conjugate nature of MSTIDs
      • Interhemispheric coupling
      • Simultaneous optical imaging and GPS TEC comparisons
    2. Equatorial B0 anomaly in September under extremely low solar activity

      Chien-Chih Lee

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016394

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      Key Points

      • The B0 of September 2008 does not decrease with a decreasing solar activity
      • A B0 anomaly in the equatorial ionosphere is found for the first time
      • The B0 anomaly is related to the changes in the bottomside electron profile
    3. Deducing storm time F region ionospheric dynamics from 3-D time-varying imaging

      S. Datta-Barua, G. S. Bust and G. Crowley

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016304

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      Key Points

      • We derive the EMPIRE imaging-based dynamics estimation algorithm
      • EMPIRE directly solves for the field-aligned and field-perpendicular drifts
      • AMIE and ISR data validate EMPIRE's up and poleward storm time drift prediction
    4. Global ionospheric response to nonmigrating DE3 and DE2 tides forced from below

      Plamen Mukhtarov and Dora Pancheva

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016099

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      Key Points

      • The ionsophere response to the nonmigrating tides from below
      • What is the reason for the observed altitude structure of the DE3/DE2 response
      • Can we forecast the ionospheric tidal response
    5. Model study on the formation of the equatorial mass density anomaly in the thermosphere

      Y. Miyoshi, H. Fujiwara, H. Jin, H. Shinagawa, H. Liu and K. Terada

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016315

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      Key Points

      • The equatorial anomaly of the neutral mass density (EMA) is investigated
      • Effects of upward propagating tides on the EMA formation is shown
    6. Mesoscale observations of Joule heating near an auroral arc and ion-neutral collision frequency in the polar cap E region

      M. J. Kosch, I. Yiu, C. Anderson, T. Tsuda, Y. Ogawa, S. Nozawa, A. Aruliah, V. Howells, L. J. Baddeley, I. W. McCrea and J. A. Wild

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016015

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      Key Points

      • Mesoscale ionospheric Joule heating variability
      • E region ion-neutral collision frequency observation including neutral winds
      • Novel radar scan with scanning Doppler imager
    7. Characteristics of 150 km echoes linked with solar eclipse and their implications to the echoing phenomenon

      A. K. Patra, P. Pavan Chaitanya and D. Tiwari

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016258

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      Key Points

      • Echoes were observed only during two brief periods of eclipse
      • Unusual ascending and descending features in the echoing regions
      • Elucidate the role of density gradient in the echoing process
    8. Detection and modeling of Rayleigh wave induced patterns in the ionosphere

      Lucie M. Rolland, Philippe Lognonné and Hiroshi Munekane

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016060

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      Key Points

      • We describe how Rayleigh-wave-induced ionospheric TEC disturbances are observed
      • We propose a model for the observations at near and far field
      • We compare the synthetics with the GPS-TEC observations
    9. COSMIC observations of dayside total electron content enhancements in response to moderate disturbances in the solar wind

      Pei-Chen Lai, Chin S. Lin, William J. Burke, Chien-Ming Huang and Ming-Quey Chen

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015772

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      Key Points

      • COSMIC observations of dayside TEC enhancement during a moderate storm
      • COSMIC detected dayside TEC enhancements as far as 50° magnetic latitude
      • Dayside TEC enhancement reflects fountain effect driven by penetration electric
    10. Response of low-latitude ionospheric total electron content to the geomagnetic storm of 24 August 2005

      Shweta Sharma, P. Galav, N. Dashora, S. Alex, R. S. Dabas and R. Pandey

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016368

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      Key Points

      • Latitudinal and longitudinal response of TEC to magnetic storm of 24 August 2005
      • Effect of PP and DD electric fields on TEC has been studied
      • Westward PP field during unsteady ring currents inferred
    11. Impact of the altitudinal Joule heating distribution on the thermosphere

      Yue Deng, Timothy J. Fuller-Rowell, Rashid A. Akmaev and Aaron J. Ridley

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016019

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      Key Points

      • The impact of altitudinal distribution of Joule heating on thermosphere
      • The major source of the non-hydrostatic disturbance
      • The relative significance of the Joule heating in different altitudes
    12. Daytime longitudinal structures of electron density and temperature in the topside ionosphere observed by the Hinotori and DEMETER satellites

      Y. Kakinami, C. H. Lin, J. Y. Liu, M. Kamogawa, S. Watanabe and M. Parrot

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015632

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      Key Points

      • Annual variations of longitudinal structure of Ne and Te in the ionosphere
      • Wave-4 and wave-3 dominate in December and September
      • Zonal and medrional wind affect longitudinal structure of Ne and Te
    13. A study on the nighttime midlatitude ionospheric trough

      Maosheng He, Libo Liu, Weixing Wan and Biqiang Zhao

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016252

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      Key Points

      • Deepest MIT occurs to the west of the geomagnetic pole in the N and S Hemispheres
      • The deepest MIT could be ascribed to the enhanced depletion by horizontal wind
      • MIT is found to oscillate periodically at 9 days about 2 to 3 deg from peak to peak
    14. Daytime ionospheric D region sharpness derived from VLF radio atmospherics

      Feng Han, Steven A. Cummer, Jingbo Li and Gaopeng Lu

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016299

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      Key Points

      • Derived the midlatitude D region equivalent exponential profile sharpness
      • Used Earth-ionosphere waveguide mode interference pattern in high-frequency range
      • Compared with IRI, FIRI, narrowband measurements
    15. The response of auroral absorption to substorm onset: Superposed epoch and propagation analyses

      A. C. Kellerman and R. A. Makarevich

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015972

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      Key Points

      • CNA responds prior to substorm onset and may be associated with depolarization
      • Eastward propagating CNA exhibits larger rise rates and propagates faster
      • CNA has 2-stage propagation: (1) rapid zonal and (2) slower meridional expansion
    16. Gravity wave seeding of equatorial plasma bubbles: An investigation with simultaneous F region, E region, and middle atmospheric measurements

      A. Taori, A. K. Patra and L. M. Joshi

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016229

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      Key Points

      • Propagating gravity wave (GW) signatures are noted in E region drifts
      • F region plasma plumes show similar temporal spacings as of GW periods
      • Spatial scales of GW, E region drifts, and EPB's exhibit strong correlations
    17. Dependence of the evening prereversal enhancement of the vertical plasma drift on geophysical parameters

      Hyosub Kil and Seung-Jun Oh

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016352

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      Key Points

      • First retrieval of PRE characteristics from individual PREs
      • First distinction of the PRE magnitude and occurrence frequency
      • Verification of control of the PRE occurrence time by E region sunset time
    18. The E region at 69°N, 19°E: Trends, significances, and detectability

      C. M. Hall, K. Rypdal and M. Rypdal

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JA016431

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      Key Points

      • There is climatic change in the lower thermosphere
      • Processes in the E-region are characterized by Hurst exponent 0.7
      • Uncertainties in trends are quantified without assuming Gaussian processes
    19. On the importance of interplanetary magnetic field ∣By∣ on polar cap patch formation

      Q.-H. Zhang, B.-C. Zhang, R.-Y. Liu, M. W. Dunlop, M. Lockwood, J. Moen, H.-G. Yang, H.-Q. Hu, Z.-J. Hu, S.-L. Liu, I. W. McCrea and M. Lester

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016287

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      Key Points

      • The observations reveal the formation of polar cap patches
      • The formation of polar cap patch was dependent on the variability in IMF By
      • Implied open flux tube evolves ∼33 min from subauroral region to the polar cap
    20. Characteristics of nighttime medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances observed over Alaska

      Minoru Kubota, Mark Conde, Mamoru Ishii, Yasuhiro Murayama and Hidekatsu Jin

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016212

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      Key Points

      • Characteristics of nighttime MSTIDs or AGWs observed over Alaska are studied
      • MSTIDs are purely caused by atmospheric gravity waves
      • MSTIDs or AGWs are generated around the lower-latitude edge of the auroral oval
    21. Decay of polar cap patch

      K. Hosokawa, J. I. Moen, K. Shiokawa and Y. Otsuka

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016297

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      Key Points

      • First observation of decay process of polar cap patch
      • Decay of patches is highly controlled by recombinations with ambient neutrals
      • Altitude of patches in the nighttime polar cap is higher than we ever thought
    22. Electric fields and neutral winds from monostatic incoherent scatter measurements by means of stochastic inversion

      T. Nygrén, A. T. Aikio, R. Kuula and M. Voiculescu

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016347

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      Key Points

      • New method of neutral wind determination
      • Electric field and neutral wind at different temporal resolutions
      • New method is applied to EISCAT measurement
    23. The production of Titan's ultraviolet nitrogen airglow

      Michael H. Stevens, Jacques Gustin, Joseph M. Ajello, J. Scott Evans, R. R. Meier, Andrew J. Kochenash, Andrew W. Stephan, A. Ian F. Stewart, Larry W. Esposito, William E. McClintock, Greg Holsclaw, E. Todd Bradley, B. R. Lewis and A. N. Heays

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016284

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      Key Points

      • First Cassini UVIS limb observations of Titan
      • Model-data comparison shows solar forcing alone can explain UV airglow
      • No carbon in Titan's UV airglow, contrary to analysis of other UVIS data
    24. Verification of large-scale rapid transport in the lower thermosphere: Tracking the exhaust plume of STS-107 from launch to the Antarctic

      R. Niciejewski, W. Skinner, M. Cooper, A. Marshall, R. R. Meier, M. H. Stevens, D. Ortland and Q. Wu

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016277

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      Key Points

      • Rapid transport in the lower thermosphere
      • Equatorial crossing of the meridional wind
      • Combined TIDI/HRDI observations of space shuttle exhaust motion
    25. Energy input into the upper atmosphere associated with high-speed solar wind streams in 2005

      Yue Deng, Yanshi Huang, Jiuhou Lei, Aaron J. Ridley, Ramon Lopez and Jeffrey Thayer

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016201

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      Key Points

      • Nine-day periodic oscillation in global integrated Joule heating has been reported
      • The sensitivities of Joule heating and HP to solar wind speed
      • Correlation of Joule heating and HP variation to the solar wind speed change
    26. Observations of unusually broadened HF radar spectra from heater-induced artificial plasma irregularities

      H. Vickers and T. Robinson

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015516

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      Key Points

      • Anisotropic spectral widths of artificial HF backscatter observed by two radars
      • Backscatter signal integrated over different latitudinal and longitudinal ranges
      • Flow gradient produced broad spectrum of HF Doppler velocity components
  2. Magnetospheric Physics

    1. Top of page
    2. Ionosphere and Upper Atmosphere
    3. Magnetospheric Physics
    4. Solar and Heliospheric Physics
    1. Statistical properties of the magnetic field in the Kronian magnetotail lobes and current sheet

      C. M. Jackman and C. S. Arridge

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015973

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      Key Points

      • Expression for falloff of Saturn lobe field strength
    2. Energetic electron precipitation during high-speed solar wind stream driven storms

      Nigel P. Meredith, Richard B. Horne, Mai Mai Lam, Michael H. Denton, Joseph E. Borovsky and Janet C. Green

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016293

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      Key Points

      • MeV flux drop outs during HSS-driven storms not due to precipitation
      • E > 30 keV electron precipitation during HSS-driven storms caused by chorus
      • Plasmaspheric hiss cause of relativistic electron precipitation at L equals 4
    3. Energetic particle phase space densities at Saturn: Cassini observations and interpretations

      P. Kollmann, E. Roussos, C. Paranicas, N. Krupp, C. M. Jackman, E. Kirsch and K.-H. Glassmeier

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016221

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      Key Points

      • Energetic particles at Saturn based on large dataset in time and energy
      • Discussions and estimates of effects governing the particle distribution
    4. Flux transport, dipolarization, and current sheet evolution during a double-onset substorm

      R. Nakamura, W. Baumjohann, E. Panov, A. A. Petrukovich, V. Angelopoulos, M. Volwerk, W. Magnes, Y. Nishimura, A. Runov, C. T. Russell, J. M. Weygand, O. Amm, H.-U. Auster, J. Bonnell, H. Frey, D. Larson and J. McFadden

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015865

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      Key Points

      • Current evolution and change in reconnection in a double-onset substorm
      • Multiple activations of reconnection modified the current sheet reconfiguration
      • Evolution of dipolarization front and flux pile up depend on the ambient plasma
    5. On the energization of protons interacting with 3-D time-dependent electromagnetic fields in the Earth's magnetotail

      Silvia Perri, Gaetano Zimbardo and Antonella Greco

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016328

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      Key Points

      • It describes a 3-D model for the study of proton acceleration in the magnetotail
      • It shows the efficiency of a Fermi-like process in energizing thermal particles
      • Energies reached by protons compare well with observations in the magnetotail
    6. Saturn's ring current: Local time dependence and temporal variability

      S. Kellett, C. S. Arridge, E. J. Bunce, A. J. Coates, S. W. H. Cowley, M. K. Dougherty, A. M. Persoon, N. Sergis and R. J. Wilson

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016216

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      Key Points

      • Mean radial profiles of Saturn's ring current (3–20 RS) vary only weakly with LT
      • Current densities on 22 passes are only modestly variable from pass to pass
      • Warm water plasma dominates current to 10 RS; hot plasma is more important beyond
    7. Using the NARMAX OLS-ERR algorithm to obtain the most influential coupling functions that affect the evolution of the magnetosphere

      R. J. Boynton, M. A. Balikhin, S. A. Billings, H. L. Wei and N. Ganushkina

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015505

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      Key Points

      • To identify a solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function from data
    8. A 2.5-D electron Hall-MHD analytical model of steady state Hall magnetic reconnection in a compressible plasma

      D. B. Korovinskiy, V. S. Semenov, N. V. Erkaev, A. V. Divin, H. K. Biernat and U. V. Möstl

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015942

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      Key Points

      • The Grad-Shafranov equation for the magnetic potential is solved
      • Self-consistent solution of the EMHD equations is obtained
      • Density depletion layers originate from the electron diffusion region
    9. A THEMIS multicase study of dipolarization fronts in the magnetotail plasma sheet

      A. Runov, V. Angelopoulos, X.-Z. Zhou, X.-J. Zhang, S. Li, F. Plaschke and J. Bonnell

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016316

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      Key Points

      • Superposed epoch analysis of THEMIS dipolarization front events
      • Common pattern in field and particle variations during front crossings
      • Particle energization and energetic plasma transport
    10. Model of the Jovian magnetic field topology constrained by the Io auroral emissions

      S. L. G. Hess, B. Bonfond, P. Zarka and D. Grodent

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016262

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      Key Points

      • A more accurate magnetic field model can be computed from the mapping of Io's fo
      • This model is consistent with the magnetometer measurements
      • This model permits a better description of the satellite-related aurorae
    11. Convection surrounding mesoscale ionospheric flow channels

      Y. Rinne, J. Moen, J. B. H. Baker and H. C. Carlson

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015997

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      Key Points

      • Study the ionospheric convection around mesoscale flow channels
    12. The ion population of the magnetotail during the 17 April 2002 magnetic storm: Large-scale kinetic simulations and IMAGE/HENA observations

      Vahé Peroomian, Mostafa El-Alaoui and Pontus C:son Brandt

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016253

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      Key Points

      • Storm time entry of solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere
      • Storm time access of ionospheric ions to the magnetotail
      • Dynamics of storm time substorms
    13. Warm plasma effects on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave MeV electron interactions in the magnetosphere

      I. Silin, I. R. Mann, R. D. Sydora, D. Summers and R. L. Mace

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016398

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      Key Points

      • Short wavelength EMIC waves are needed to scatter electrons efficiently
      • EMIC waves at helium gyrofrequency have small wave numbers
      • EMIC waves may scatter electrons under 2 MeV only in plasmaspheric plumes
    14. Simulation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron triggered emissions in the Earth's inner magnetosphere

      Masafumi Shoji and Yoshiharu Omura

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016351

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      Key Points

      • The first hybrid simulation study on EMIC-triggered emissions
      • Good agreement is found with the observation and nonlinear theory
      • Precipitation and acceleration of energetic protons due to triggered emissions
    15. Effects of the guard electrode on the photoelectron distribution around an electric field sensor

      Y. Miyake, H. Usui and H. Kojima

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015600

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      Key Points

      • We proposed the electric field sensor model for plasma particle simulations
      • We made a distribution analysis of photoelectrons interfering with the sensor
      • We revealed an optimal potential condition of the photoelectron guard electrode
    16. Flow of mass and energy in the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

      Fran Bagenal and Peter A. Delamere

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016294

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      Key Points

      • Substantial mass is added to these giant magnetospheres
      • The plasma is heated significantly as it moves outward
      • Jupiter's plasma sheet is much more massive and hotter than Saturn's
    17. Comparison between the two basic modes of magnetospheric convection

      George L. Siscoe, Charlie J. Farrugia and Per Even Sandholt

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015842

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      Key Points

      • Two types of magnetospheric convection have two phases
      • Net transfer of magnetic flux occurs in both types
      • Mode of transfer differs in the two cases
    18. On the force balance around dipolarization fronts within bursty bulk flows

      S.-S. Li, V. Angelopoulos, A. Runov, X.-Z. Zhou, J. McFadden, D. Larson, J. Bonnell and U. Auster

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015884

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      Key Points

      • Force estimation within the vicinity of dipolarization front
      • Particle acceleration due to pressure gradient ahead of the front
      • Curvature force increases after the front passage
    19. A predictive model of geosynchronous magnetopause crossings

      A. Dmitriev, A. Suvorova and J.-K. Chao

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016208

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      Key Points

      • Geosynchronous orbit
      • Storm time magnetopause
      • Space weather
    20. RCM-E simulation of ion acceleration during an idealized plasma sheet bubble injection

      J. Yang, F. R. Toffoletto, R. A. Wolf and S. Sazykin

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016346

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      Key Points

      • We quantitatively calculate particle flux variations at GEO orbit using RCM-E
      • We reproduce characteristic features, and find what a injection boundary is
      • Plasma sheet bubbles are elementary vehicles of substorm particle injections
    21. Effects of superthermal ring current ion tails on the electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability in multi-ion magnetospheric plasmas

      R. L. Mace, R. D. Sydora and I. Silin

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016393

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      Key Points

      • Power law tails on the ring current plasma affect EMIC wave growth rates
      • Ring current plasma composition plays a crucial role in determining instability
      • The harder the power law tail, the greater the instability growth rate
    22. Triggering process of whistler mode chorus emissions in the magnetosphere

      Yoshiharu Omura and David Nunn

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016280

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      Key Points

      • New theoretical development on VLF chorus emissions
      • Good agreement is found with simulations and observation
      • This analysis establishes the missing link in the previous theories
    23. Auroral electron distributions within and close to the Saturn kilometric radiation source region

      P. Schippers, C. S. Arridge, J. D. Menietti, D. A. Gurnett, L. Lamy, B. Cecconi, D. G. Mitchell, N. André, W. S. Kurth, S. Grimald, M. K. Dougherty, A. J. Coates, N. Krupp and D. T. Young

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JA016461

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      Key Points

      • Identification of electron populations in the downward and upward current region
      • Identification of electron distributions within SKR source region
      • Characterization of the high-latitude acceleration regions
    24. TC-1 observations of a flux rope: Generation by multiple X line reconnection

      L. Trenchi, M. F. Marcucci, H. Rème, C. M. Carr and J. B. Cao

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015986

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      Key Points

      • For the first time an FTE with the axis parallel to the X line is observed
    25. Three-dimensional, multifluid, high spatial resolution MHD model studies of the solar wind interaction with Mars

      Dalal Najib, Andrew F. Nagy, Gábor Tóth and Yingjuan Ma

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016272

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      Key Points

      • This article presents new results of our 3-D multifluid MHD Mars model
    26. A survey of the anisotropy of the outer electron radiation belt during high-speed-stream-driven storms

      Joseph E. Borovsky and Michael H. Denton

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016151

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      Key Points

      • There is a persistent, systematic anisotropy to the radiation belt
    27. From space weather toward space climate time scales: Substorm analysis from 1993 to 2008

      E. I. Tanskanen, T. I. Pulkkinen, A. Viljanen, K. Mursula, N. Partamies and J. A. Slavin

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015788

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      Key Points

      • We found interannual variations in substorm number, duration and peak amplitude
      • The largest substorm activity is during declining solar cycle phase
      • A winter-summer asymmetry was found for substorm number and substorm duration
    28. Characteristics of plasma flows at the inner edge of the plasma sheet

      R. L. McPherron, T.-S. Hsu, J. Kissinger, X. Chu and V. Angelopoulos

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015923

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      Key Points

      • Fast plasma flows are associated with substorm onsets
      • Fast flows pileup near midnight but are diverted around Earth elsewhere
      • Fast flow cause field dipolarization and substorm current wedge
    29. Cluster observations of multiple dipolarization fronts

      K.-J. Hwang, M. L. Goldstein, E. Lee and J. S. Pickett

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015742

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      Key Points

      • Cluster observations of multiple dipolarization fronts
      • Deformation of the injection boundary via interchange instability
    30. Substorm triggering by poleward boundary intensification and related equatorward propagation

      S. B. Mende, H. U. Frey, V. Angelopoulos and Y. Nishimura

      Article first published online: 5 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015733

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      Key Points

      • N-S arc activity frequently precede auroral substorm reintensifications
      • N-S activity may trigger some but not all substorm reintensifications
    31. Midnight sector observations of auroral omega bands

      J. A. Wild, E. E. Woodfield, E. Donovan, R. C. Fear, A. Grocott, M. Lester, A. N. Fazakerley, E. Lucek, Y. Khotyaintsev, M. Andre, A. Kadokura, K. Hosokawa, C. Carlson, J. P. McFadden, K. H. Glassmeier, V. Angelopoulos and G. Björnsson

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015874

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    32. Evolution of ring current ion energy spectra during the storm recovery phase: Implication for dominant ion loss processes

      K. Keika, P. C. Brandt, M. Nosé and D. G. Mitchell

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015628

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      Key Points

      • Temporal evolution of ring current ion energy spectra during the recovery phase
      • The storm early and rapid recovery cannot be explained by charge exchange
      • Greater than 60 keV H+ dominate the ring current during the late recovery phase
    33. Superposed epoch analysis of magnetotail flux transport during substorms observed by THEMIS

      J. Liu, C. Gabrielse, V. Angelopoulos, N. A. Frissell, L. R. Lyons, J. P. McFadden, J. Bonnell and K. H. Glassmeier

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015886

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    34. Joule heating associated with auroral electrojets during magnetospheric substorms

      X.-Y. Zhou, W. Sun, A. J. Ridley and S. B. Mende

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015804

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    35. Time-dependent magnetospheric configuration and breakup mapping during a substorm

      M. Kubyshkina, V. Sergeev, N. Tsyganenko, V. Angelopoulos, A. Runov, E. Donovan, H. Singer, U. Auster and W. Baumjohann

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015882

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    36. Substorm growth and expansion onset as observed with ideal ground-spacecraft THEMIS coverage

      V. Sergeev, V. Angelopoulos, M. Kubyshkina, E. Donovan, X.-Z. Zhou, A. Runov, H. Singer, J. McFadden and R. Nakamura

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015689

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    37. Embedded current sheets in the Earth’s magnetotail

      A. A. Petrukovich, A. V. Artemyev, H. V. Malova, V. Y. Popov, R. Nakamura and L. M. Zelenyi

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015749

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    38. Current carriers near dipolarization fronts in the magnetotail: A THEMIS event study

      X.-J. Zhang, V. Angelopoulos, A. Runov, X.-Z. Zhou, J. Bonnell, J. P. McFadden, D. Larson and U. Auster

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015885

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    39. Steady magnetospheric convection and stream interfaces: Relationship over a solar cycle

      J. Kissinger, R. L. McPherron, T.-S. Hsu and V. Angelopoulos

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015763

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    40. Periodic black auroral patches at the dawnside dipolarization front during a substorm

      K. Sakaguchi, K. Shiokawa, E. Donovan, A. Nakajima, Y. Hiraki, T. Trondsen and F. Plaschke

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA015957

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  3. Solar and Heliospheric Physics

    1. Top of page
    2. Ionosphere and Upper Atmosphere
    3. Magnetospheric Physics
    4. Solar and Heliospheric Physics
    1. Energy transfer during intense geomagnetic storms driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions

      Jianpeng Guo, Xueshang Feng, Barbara A. Emery, Jie Zhang, Changqing Xiang, Fang Shen and Wenbin Song

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JA016490

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      Key Points

      • Intense storms driven by ICMEs and sheath regions
      • The evolution of solar wind energy input and dissipation
      • The quantitative assessment of the energy input and dissipation
    2. Observations of reconnection exhausts associated with large-scale current sheets within a complex ICME at 1 AU

      X. Xu, F. Wei and X. Feng

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016159

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      Key Points

      • First report exhausts associated with “near-center” large-scale
      • The results in this paper are consistent with the previous reports
      • Reconnections at the center probably fragment flux ropes into smaller flux ropes
    3. Numeric and analytic study of interplanetary coronal mass ejection and shock evolution: Driving, decoupling, and decaying

      P. Corona-Romero and J. A. Gonzalez-Esparza

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016008

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      Key Points

      • We analyze the heliocentric evolution of ICMEs and shocks
      • We focus on the transferring of momentum from the ICME to the shock
      • ICMEs and theirs shocks present three stages: driving, decoupling, and decaying
    4. A survey of gradual solar energetic particle events

      L. Barnard and M. Lockwood

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016133

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      Key Points

      • SEP occurrence rate and fluences are correlated with solar activity
      • Acute risk from SEP fluences may be enhanced in periods of low solar activity
      • SEP fluence models may be improved with an updated SEP database and methodology
    5. On the energy cascade rate of solar wind turbulence in high cross helicity flows

      J. J. Podesta

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JA016306

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      Key Points

      • The total energy spectrum has a 3/2 scaling in high cross helicity wind
      • A generalization of Boldyrev's theory is used to estimate the energy cascade rate
      • The energy cascade rate takes typical values from 100 to 2400 J/kg/s

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