Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 3

March 2014

Volume 119, Issue 3

Pages i–v, 1517–2128

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Correction
    1. Issue Information (pages i–v)

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrc.20348

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Correction
    1. Distinct modes of East Asian Winter Monsoon documented by a southern Red Sea coral record (pages 1517–1533)

      Monica Ionita, Thomas Felis, Gerrit Lohmann, Norel Rimbu and Jürgen Pätzold

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009203

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • The coral documents information on ENSO-like variability and stationarity
      • Abrupt shift in the relationship of the coral with ENSO
      • Strong influence of EAWM and Siberian High after 1960s
    2. Interactions between waves, sediment, and turbulence on a shallow estuarine mudflat (pages 1534–1553)

      Lissa J. MacVean and Jessica R. Lacy

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009477

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Observations of flow and sediment were collected on an estuarine mudflat
      • Waves led to stratification by sediment and increased shear production of TKE
      • Wave-enhanced turbulence mixed sediment high into the water column
    3. The dynamics of pressure and form drag on a sloping headland: Internal waves versus eddies (pages 1554–1571)

      Sally J. Warner and Parker MacCready

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009757

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Tides generate internal waves and eddies as they flow past sloping topography
      • Bottom pressure is divided into parts that do and do not contribute to form drag
      • Internal waves and eddies remove similar amounts of energy from tidal currents
    4. On the ability of global sea level reconstructions to determine trends and variability (pages 1572–1592)

      F. M. Calafat, D. P. Chambers and M. N. Tsimplis

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009298

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Variability is better captured if the EOF0 is not used
      • The reconstruction method with the EOF0 does not use global information
      • The reconstructed GMSL without the EOF0 is correlated with hydrology changes
    5. Sea level extremes at the coasts of China (pages 1593–1608)

      Xiangbo Feng and Michael N. Tsimplis

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009607

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Return levels are sensitive to the number of events used in the estimation
      • Trends in extremes are due to changes in median sea level and tide
      • Tropical cyclones dominate the events of sea level extremes
    6. Seasonal variability of methyl iodide in the Kiel Fjord (pages 1609–1620)

      Qiang Shi, Gert Petrick, Birgit Quack, Christa Marandino and Douglas Wallace

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009328

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A seasonal cycle of CH3I in the Kiel Fjord
      • The primary forcing of CH3I production in surface seawater
      • The broad seasonal peak of Pnet makes it difficult to determine the key factor
    7. Circulation in the southern Great Barrier Reef studied through an integration of multiple remote sensing and in situ measurements (pages 1621–1643)

      Yadan Mao and John L. Luick

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009397

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • New mechanisms for stratification and upwelling in the SGBR are identified
      • Detailed properties of the Capricorn Eddy are observed
      • The integrative method is powerful in studying complex coastal circulation
    8. Evaluation of Labrador Sea Water formation in a global Finite-Element Sea-Ice Ocean Model setup, based on a comparison with observational data (pages 1644–1667)

      P. Scholz, D. Kieke, G. Lohmann, M. Ionita and M. Rhein

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009232

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Point

      • FESOM is a suitable tool to simulate the variability of the LSW mode waters
    9. Wave bottom boundary layer processes below irregular surfzone breaking waves with light-weight sheet flow particle transport (pages 1668–1690)

      François Xavier Chassagneux and David Hurther

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009338

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Data set of near-bed measurements in wave flume
      • Flow and sediment transport properties across the wave breaking region
      • Bed shear stress predictions
    10. Hotspots in cold seas: The composition, distribution, and abundance of marine birds in the North American Arctic (pages 1691–1705)

      Sarah N. P. Wong, Carina Gjerdrum, Ken H. Morgan and Mark L. Mallory

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009198

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • At-sea distribution of seabirds in the North American Arctic was examined
      • Hotspots identified: Bering Sea, Lancaster Sound, Baffin Bay, Davis Strait
      • Few birds between Dolphin and Union Strait and King William Island
    11. Seasonal variations of the upper ocean salinity stratification in the Tropics (pages 1706–1722)

      Christophe Maes and Terence J. O'Kane

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009366

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Describe ocean salinity stratification (OSS)
      • Describe its seasonal variations
      • Relate the OSS to the surface SST and SSS fields
    12. Seasonality and long-term trend of Arctic Ocean surface stress in a model (pages 1723–1738)

      Torge Martin, Michael Steele and Jinlun Zhang

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009425

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Weaker Arctic sea ice causes increased annual mean ocean surface stress (+20%)
      • Increasing open water area in summer yields momentum flux reduction (−7%)
      • An optimal ice concentration of 80–90% amplifies momentum transfer threefold
    13. An anomalous near-bottom cross-shelf intrusion of slope water on the southern New England continental shelf (pages 1739–1753)

      D. S. Ullman, D. L. Codiga, A. Pfeiffer-Herbert and C. R. Kincaid

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009259

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Anomalous intrusion of slope water observed on the shelf south of New England
      • Intrusion appeared to mix with the ambient shelf water
      • Shelfbreak front/warm-core ring interaction likely cause of intrusion
    14. Export and circulation of ice cavity water in Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica (pages 1754–1764)

      A. M. Thurnherr, S. S. Jacobs, P. Dutrieux and C. F. Giulivi

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009307

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Observations document a 1.5Sv gyre dominating the upper 700 m of Pine Island Bay
      • Export of ice-cavity water drives a boundary current along a glacier calving front
      • Upwelling of ice-cavity water occurs partially within the shear margins of ice streams
    15. Simulation of subice shelf melt rates in a general circulation model: Velocity-dependent transfer and the role of friction (pages 1765–1790)

      Véronique Dansereau, Patrick Heimbach and Martin Losch

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC008846

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Different parameterizations of sub-iceshelf melting give different melt patterns
      • The choice of parameterization impacts the simulated shelf-ocean interactions
    16. Exploring the Red Sea seasonal ecosystem functioning using a three-dimensional biophysical model (pages 1791–1811)

      G. Triantafyllou, F. Yao, G. Petihakis, K. P. Tsiaras, D. E. Raitsos and I. Hoteit

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009641

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Red Sea 3-D ecosystem model development and validation
      • Examine the role of water exchange with the Gulf of Aden and winter overturning
      • Physical processes in determining the evolution and variability of the ecosystem
    17. Uncertainty in hurricane surge simulation due to land cover specification (pages 1812–1827)

      Celso M. Ferreira, Jennifer L. Irish and Francisco Olivera

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009604

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Land cover can be a source of uncertainty in storm surge numerical modeling
      • Model uncertainty from land cover choice in bays can be 7% of predicted surge
      • Uncertainty depends on surge magnitude, storm meteorology, and bay geometry
    18. Propagation of uncertainty analysis of CO2 transfer velocities derived from the COARE gas transfer model using satellite inputs (pages 1828–1842)

      Darren L. Jackson and Gary A. Wick

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009271

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • CO2 gas transfer uncertainties determined for COAREG using satellite inputs
      • Uncertainty in satellite-derived wind speed is dominate factor in gas transfer
      • Ta uncertainty can affect gas transfer uncertainty at low wind speeds
    19. Seasonal to interannual variability in density around the Canary Islands and their influence on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation at 26°N (pages 1843–1860)

      Aurélie Duchez, Eleanor Frajka-Williams, Natalia Castro, Joël Hirschi and Andrew Coward

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009416

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Robust relationship between: density, local WSC, and AMOC
      • Density fluctuations drive the UMO transport at seasonal/interannual time scales
    20. Wind-driven variability in sea surface temperature front distribution in the California Current System (pages 1861–1875)

      Renato M. Castelao and Yuntao Wang

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009531

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Seasonal evolution of fronts strongly coupled to coastal alongshore wind stress
      • Widening of band of high frontal activity is related to seasonal upwelling winds
      • Timing of widening is related to wind stress curl in the lee of Cape Blanco
    21. Observations of the space-time structure of flow, turbulence, and stress over orbital-scale ripples (pages 1876–1898)

      Jenna Hare, Alex E. Hay, Len Zedel and Richard Cheel

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009370

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Turbulence-resolved measurements in oscillatory boundary layer above vortex ripples
      • Measurements made using wide-band bistatic coherent acoustic Doppler profiler
      • Shear stress via the vorticity equation and double-averaging
    22. Evaluating Langmuir turbulence parameterizations in the ocean surface boundary layer (pages 1899–1910)

      G. Sutherland, K. H. Christensen and B. Ward

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009537

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • We made open ocean measurements of air-sea fluxes, waves, and dissipation
      • Dissipation observations scale with the Langmuir number in the mixing layer
      • Observations match the regime diagram of Belcher et al. (2012) within a factor of 10
    23. Seasonality of floc strength in the southern North Sea (pages 1911–1926)

      Michael Fettweis, Matthias Baeye, Dimitry Van der Zande, Dries Van den Eynde and Byung Joon Lee

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009750

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • SPM and Chl concentration have opposing seasonal signal
      • The seasonality of SPM concentration is mainly caused by biological effects
      • Macroflocs are more abundant and stronger in summer than winter season
    24. Model simulated volume fluxes through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Davis Strait: Linking monthly variations to forcing in different seasons (pages 1927–1942)

      Youyu Lu, Simon Higginson, Shannon Nudds, Simon Prinsenberg and Gilles Garric

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009408

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Modeled volume flux variability through CAA
      • Focus on variability at monthly time scales
      • Control and forcing mechanisms vary for different sections
    25. Internal tide generation in nonuniformly stratified deep oceans (pages 1943–1956)

      M. S. Paoletti, Matthew Drake and Harry L. Swinney

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009469

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Even below a turning depth tidal flow over topography generates internal tides
      • Linear theory with an effective stratification predicts internal tide power
      • Internal tides generated below a turning depth are insensitive to topographic shape
    26. Circulation around La Réunion and Mauritius islands in the south-western Indian Ocean: A modeling perspective (pages 1957–1976)

      Stéphane Pous, Pascal Lazure, Gaël André, Franck Dumas, Issufo Halo and Pierrick Penven

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009704

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Circulation around both islands is dominated by westward propagating features
      • The predominant time scale of variability of currents and SSH is 60 days
      • There is local generation of eddies in the lee of the islands due to topography
    27. Horizontal and residual circulations driven by wind stress curl in Tokyo Bay (pages 1977–1992)

      K. Nakayama, T. Shintani, K. Shimizu, T. Okada, H. Hinata and K. Komai

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009396

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • The influence of the wind stress curl on residual currents is clarified
      • The deepening of isopycnals is found to be driven by negative wind stress curl
      • We proposed to categorize the regimes of nonlinear surface Ekman layer
    28. Surf zone bathymetry and circulation predictions via data assimilation of remote sensing observations (pages 1993–2016)

      G. W. Wilson, H. T. Özkan-Haller, R. A. Holman, M. C. Haller, D. A. Honegger and C. C. Chickadel

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009213

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Field application of a nearshore EnKF data assimilation system
      • Remote sensing data are assimilated to improve model bathymetry
      • After assimilating data, model prediction of a rip current is also improved
    29. Influences of intratidal variations in density field on the subtidal currents: Implication from a synchronized observation by multiships and a diagnostic calculation (pages 2017–2033)

      Zhongya Cai, Zhe Liu, Xinyu Guo, Huiwang Gao and Qiang Wang

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009262

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • The density-driven current in Jiaozhou Bay was simulated by a diagnostic model
      • The results by nonsynchronous data are quite different with synchronous data
      • The results by tidally averaged data are consistent with synchronous data
    30. Absorption and fluorescence of dissolved organic matter in the waters of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Baffin Bay, and the Labrador Sea (pages 2034–2047)

      Céline Guéguen, Chad W. Cuss, Chase J. Cassels and Eddy C. Carmack

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009173

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • CDOM and FDOM distribution in the upper 1300 m waters
      • Importance of in situ production of humic-like components
      • Reduced remineralization in the Arctic outflow
    31. Mesoscale eddies in the South Atlantic Bight and the Gulf Stream Recirculation region: Vertical structure (pages 2048–2065)

      Renato M. Castelao

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014JC009796

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Eddies in the SAB are characterized by large temperature and salinity anomalies
      • Rotational speeds exceed translation speeds in the top 1000 m of the water column
      • Nonlinear eddies transport on average 7.6 Sv into the SAB
    32. Autonomous observations of solar energy partitioning in first-year sea ice in the Arctic Basin (pages 2066–2080)

      Caixin Wang, Mats A. Granskog, Sebastian Gerland, Stephen R. Hudson, Donald K. Perovich, Marcel Nicolaus, Tor Ivan Karlsen, Kristen Fossan and Marius Bratrein

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009459

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Autonomous sea ice albedo setup was developed and deployed in high Arctic
      • Strong influence of sky and surface conditions variation on absorbed energy
      • Solar heat could explain all of the observed snow and sea ice melt in 2012
    33. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Formation of bottom water and its variability in the northwestern part of the Sea of Japan (pages 2081–2094)

      Kiyoshi Tanaka

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009456

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • The formation of bottom water in the Sea of Japan was investigated
      • In Winter 2001, the dense shelf water descended to depths greater than 3000 m
      • The formation of bottom water has large interannual variability
    34. Poleward ocean heat transports, sea ice processes, and Arctic sea ice variability in NorESM1-M simulations (pages 2095–2108)

      A. B. Sandø, Y. Gao and H. R. Langehaug

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009435

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • BSO heat transport controls Barents Sea ice cover in terms of congelation growth
      • Bottom melting controls sea ice mass variability in the Central Arctic Ocean
      • Ocean has stronger direct impact on changes in sea ice mass than the atmosphere
    35. Impact of a coastal-trapped wave on the near-coastal circulation of the Peru upwelling system from glider data (pages 2109–2120)

      Alice Pietri, Vincent Echevin, Pierre Testor, Alexis Chaigneau, Laurent Mortier, Carmen Grados and Aurélie Albert

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009270

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Structure and variability of the alongshore coastal currents off southern Peru
      • Impact of a coastal-trapped wave on the near-coastal circulation off Peru
  3. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Correction
    1. You have free access to this content

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION