Satellite observations of ozone in the upper mesosphere

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Abstract

[1] Ozone profiles in the upper mesosphere (70–100 km) retrieved from nine instruments are compared. Ozone from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument is used as the basis of comparison. Other measurements are from the Halogen Occultation Experiment, the High Resolution Doppler Imager, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment—Fourier Transform Spectrometer, the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment, the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System, and the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder. Comparisons of each data set with SABER using coincident profiles indicate agreement in the basic vertical profile of ozone but also some systematic differences in daytime ozone. Ozone from the SABER 9.6 μm channel is higher than the other measurements over the altitude range 60–80 km by 20–50%. Nighttime comparisons indicate better relative agreement (<10% difference). Taking all the data, not limited to coincidences, shows the global and seasonal distributions of ozone in the upper mesosphere from each instrument. The average maximum in ozone mixing ratio is around 90–92 km during daytime and 95 km at night. There is a maximum in ozone density at night (∼90 km) and during some hours of the day. The latitude structure of ozone has appreciable variations with season, particularly in the tropical upper mesosphere. The basic latitude-altitude structure of ozone depends on local time, even when the analysis is restricted to day-only observations.

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