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Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012)

Cover image for Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012)

27 July 2012

Volume 117, Issue D14

Currently known as: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

  1. Aerosol and Clouds

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Climate and Dynamics
    4. Composition and Chemistry
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      Ice clouds microphysical retrieval using 94-GHz Doppler radar observations: Basic relations within the retrieval framework

      Wanda Szyrmer, Aleksandra Tatarevic and Pavlos Kollias

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016675

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      Key Points

      • New approach to represent mass-Diameter
      • Relationship between coefficients in m-D and U-A relationships
      • Ice microphysics retrieval using Doppler radar observations
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      Near-real-time global biomass burning emissions product from geostationary satellite constellation

      Xiaoyang Zhang, Shobha Kondragunta, Jessica Ram, Christopher Schmidt and Ho-Chun Huang

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017459

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      Key Points

      • Global fire radiative power is obtained from multiple geostationary satellites
      • Diurnal FRP patterns for individual fire pixels are simulated
      • Global biomass burning emissions are produced in near real time from FRP
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      Parameterization of instantaneous global horizontal irradiance: Cloudy-sky component

      Z. Sun, J. Liu, X. Zeng and H. Liang

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017557

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      Key Points

      • Introduce a new fast scheme for determining solar radiation at surface
      • Scheme has solid physical basis
      • Produces more accurate results than most early studies
  2. Climate and Dynamics

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Climate and Dynamics
    4. Composition and Chemistry
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Response and sensitivity of the nocturnal boundary layer over land to added longwave radiative forcing

      R. T. McNider, G. J. Steeneveld, A. A. M. Holtslag, R. A. Pielke Sr., S. Mackaro, A. Pour-Biazar, J. Walters, U. Nair and J. Christy

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017578

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      Key Points

      • Nonlinear dynamics in the stable boundary layer can amplify radiative forcing
      • Change in the diurnal temperature trend may be due boundary layer dynamics
      • Temperature response in the stable BL to radiative forcing is a function of height
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      Evaluation of cloud and water vapor simulations in CMIP5 climate models using NASA “A-Train” satellite observations

      Jonathan H. Jiang, Hui Su, Chengxing Zhai, Vincent S. Perun, Anthony Del Genio, Larissa S. Nazarenko, Leo J. Donner, Larry Horowitz, Charles Seman, Jason Cole, Andrew Gettelman, Mark A. Ringer, Leon Rotstayn, Stephen Jeffrey, Tongwen Wu, Florent Brient, Jean-Louis Dufresne, Hideaki Kawai, Tsuyoshi Koshiro, Masahiro Watanabe, Tristan S. LÉcuyer, Evgeny M. Volodin, Trond Iversen, Helge Drange, Michel D. S. Mesquita, William G. Read, Joe W. Waters, Baijun Tian, Joao Teixeira and Graeme L. Stephens

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017237

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      Key Points

      • We evaluate climate model simulations using satellite observations
      • We focus on clouds and water vapor
      • We rank the models based on their performances
      Corrected by:

      Correction: Correction to “Evaluation of cloud and water vapor simulations in CMIP5 climate models using NASA “A-Train” satellite observations”

      Vol. 118, Issue 19, 11,087, Article first published online: 10 OCT 2013

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      Dependency of the North Pacific winter storm tracks on the zonal distribution of MJO convection

      Yun-Young Lee and Gyu-Ho Lim

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016417

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      Key Points

      • Tropical contribution to North Pacific storminess in winter season
      • Sub-seasonal variation of synoptic weather systems in their mean amplitude
      • MJO and storm track linkage
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      El Niño-Southern Oscillation, the Madden-Julian Oscillation and Atlantic basin tropical cyclone rapid intensification

      Philip J. Klotzbach

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017714

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      Key Points

      • Atlantic basin tropical cyclone RI is modulated by ENSO and the MJO
      • Knowing the phase of the MJO on the day of TC formation gives RI likelihood
      • Combining the MJO and ENSO provides even greater skill
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      Seasonal variation of N2O emissions in France inferred from atmospheric N2O and 222Rn measurements

      M. Lopez, M. Schmidt, C. Yver, C. Messager, D. Worthy, V. Kazan, M. Ramonet, P. Bousquet and P. Ciais

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017703

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      Key Points

      • Mean seasonal cycle of N2O shows the importance of the agricultural source
      • Annual nitrous oxide emissions are correlated with annual precipitation
      • Comparison between atmospheric approach and inventories agree well
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      Role of sea surface temperature and wind convergence in regulating convection over the tropical Indian Ocean

      S. Meenu, K. Parameswaran and K. Rajeev

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016947

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      Key Points

      • Tropospheric convection over the tropical Indian ocean
      • Relationship among SST, wind convergence and convection
      • Cloud distribution under different conditions of SST and atmospheric dynamics
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      Decreased albedo, e-folding depth and photolytic OH radical and NO2 production with increasing black carbon content in Arctic snow

      H. J. Reay, J. L. France and M. D. King

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016630

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      Key Points

      • With ~10-20 ng g-1 of black carbon (BC) in snow, absorption becomes BC dominated
      • Doubling black carbon reduces the e-folding depth to ~70% of its initial value
      • Doubling black carbon decreases F(OH) and F(NO2) to ~70% and ~65% respectively
  3. Composition and Chemistry

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Climate and Dynamics
    4. Composition and Chemistry
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      Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow

      Didier Voisin, Jean-Luc Jaffrezo, Stéphan Houdier, Manuel Barret, Julie Cozic, Martin D. King, James L. France, Holly J. Reay, Amanda Grannas, Gregor Kos, Parisa A. Ariya, Harry J. Beine and Florent Domine

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016612

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      Key Points

      • Total Carbon Content is measured as a funtion of snow type
      • We discuss these concentrations in regard to snow physical evolution
      • First HULIS concentration and optical properties measurement in snow
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      Springtime boundary layer ozone depletion at Barrow, Alaska: Meteorological influence, year-to-year variation, and long-term change

      Samuel J. Oltmans, Bryan J. Johnson and Joyce M. Harris

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016889

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      Key Points

      • Changing sea ice conditions are altering ozone boundary layer chemistry
      • Spring boundary layer ozone depletion events have increased in March at Barrow
      • Boundary layer ozone depletion at Barrow is strongly influenced by transport
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      PTR-MS observations of photo-enhanced VOC release from Arctic and midlatitude snow

      S. S. Gao, S. J. Sjostedt, S. Sharma, S. R. Hall, K. Ullmann and J. P. D. Abbatt

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017152

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      Key Points

      • PTR-MS was used to make real-time measurements of VOCs from irradiated snow
      • Similar VOCs were emitted from irradiated snow from vastly different locations
      • VOCs emission are potentially affected by snow composition (organics, oxidants)
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      Observations of inorganic bromine (HOBr, BrO, and Br2) speciation at Barrow, Alaska, in spring 2009

      J. Liao, L. G. Huey, D. J. Tanner, F. M. Flocke, J. J. Orlando, J. A. Neuman, J. B. Nowak, A. J. Weinheimer, S. R. Hall, J. N. Smith, A. Fried, R. M. Staebler, Y. Wang, J.-H. Koo, C. A. Cantrell, P. Weibring, J. Walega, D. J. Knapp, P. B. Shepson and C. R. Stephens

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016641

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      Key Points

      • First observations of HOBr are presented
      • Direct evidence for high winds activating bromine
      • HOBr can be reproduced with model including aerosol uptake
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      Soluble chromophores in marine snow, seawater, sea ice and frost flowers near Barrow, Alaska

      Harry Beine, Cort Anastasio, Florent Domine, Thomas Douglas, Manuel Barret, James France, Martin King, Sam Hall and Kirk Ullmann

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016650

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      Key Points

      • Light absorption in frost flowers is 40 times larger than in terrestrial snow
      • H2O2, NO3-, NO2- contribute <1% to light absorption in marine samples
      • CDOM is a major source of OH in our marine samples
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      Structure, specific surface area and thermal conductivity of the snowpack around Barrow, Alaska

      Florent Domine, Jean-Charles Gallet, Josué Bock and Samuel Morin

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016647

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      Key Points

      • The specific surface area and heat conductivity of snow at Barrow were measured
      • Snow properties are highly influenced by climate, in particular wind
      • The properties of the Barrow snow allow efficient storage of chemical species
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      Chemical composition of the snowpack during the OASIS spring campaign 2009 at Barrow, Alaska

      H. W. Jacobi, D. Voisin, J. L. Jaffrezo, J. Cozic and T. A. Douglas

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016654

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      Key Points

      • Chemical composition of the Arctic snowpack
      • Major processes influencing the chemistry of the snowpack
      • Investigation of physical and chemical processes in the snow
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      Hydroxyl radical and NOx production rates, black carbon concentrations and light-absorbing impurities in snow from field measurements of light penetration and nadir reflectivity of onshore and offshore coastal Alaskan snow

      J. L. France, H. J. Reay, M. D. King, D. Voisin, H. W. Jacobi, F. Domine, H. Beine, C. Anastasio, A. MacArthur and J. Lee-Taylor

      Article first published online: 9 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016639

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      Key Points

      • Black carbon and HULIS required to explain snow absorption
      • Nitrite photolysis contributes more to NOx production than anticipated
      • Snowpacks at Barrow are optically very similar
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      The relative importance of chlorine and bromine radicals in the oxidation of atmospheric mercury at Barrow, Alaska

      Chelsea R. Stephens, Paul B. Shepson, Alexandra Steffen, Jan W. Bottenheim, Jin Liao, L. Greg Huey, Eric Apel, Andy Weinheimer, Samuel R. Hall, Christopher Cantrell, Barkley C. Sive, D. J. Knapp, D. D. Montzka and Rebecca S. Hornbrook

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016649

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      Key Points

      • We previously did not know what halogen radicals were oxidizing Hg in the Arctic
      • We now know that all of Br, BrO and Cl can be important
      • We really need to measure the T-dependent rate constants, especially for Cl atom
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      Frost flowers growing in the Arctic ocean-atmosphere–sea ice–snow interface: 1. Chemical composition

      Thomas A. Douglas, Florent Domine, Manuel Barret, Cort Anastasio, Harry J. Beine, Jan Bottenheim, Amanda Grannas, Stephan Houdier, Stoyka Netcheva, Glenn Rowland, Ralf Staebler and Alexandra Steffen

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016460

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      Key Points

      • Brine and frost flowers on sea ice have interactions with the lower atmosphere
      • Frost flowers have some predictable and some unpredictable chemical composition
      • Changing sea ice regimes likely mean more brine and frost flowers in the future
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      Frost flowers growing in the Arctic ocean-atmosphere–sea ice–snow interface: 2. Mercury exchange between the atmosphere, snow, and frost flowers

      Laura S. Sherman, Joel D. Blum, Thomas A. Douglas and Alexandra Steffen

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016186

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      Key Points

      • Hg stable isotopes can be used to trace Hg cycling during AMDEs
      • Frost flowers adsorb Hg that is reemitted from snow during AMDEs
      • Frost flowers aid in the local retention of Hg on sea ice during AMDEs
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      An isotopic view on the connection between photolytic emissions of NOx from the Arctic snowpack and its oxidation by reactive halogens

      S. Morin, J. Erbland, J. Savarino, F. Domine, J. Bock, U. Friess, H.-W. Jacobi, H. Sihler and J. M. F. Martins

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016618

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      Key Points

      • Comprehensive (N and O) isotopic composition of nitrate over one year at Barrow
      • NOx emissions by the snowpack strongly interact with reactive halogens
      • No significant correlation is found between daily averaged ozone, BrO and D17O

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