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Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012)

Cover image for Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012)

27 October 2012

Volume 117, Issue D20

Currently known as: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

  1. Aerosol and Clouds

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Climate and Dynamics
    4. Composition and Chemistry
    1. You have free access to this content
      Development and initial application of the global-through-urban weather research and forecasting model with chemistry (GU-WRF/Chem)

      Yang Zhang, Prakash Karamchandani, Tim Glotfelty, David G. Streets, Georg Grell, Athanasios Nenes, Fangqun Yu and Ralf Bennartz

      Article first published online: 27 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017966

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      Key Points

      • A unified global-through-urban online-coupled meteorology-chemistry model
      • Important aerosol direct and indirect feedbacks across various spatial scales
      • Model predictions are sensitive to nucleation and aerosol activation modules
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      Spectral width of premonsoon and monsoon clouds over Indo-Gangetic valley

      Thara V. Prabha, S. Patade, G. Pandithurai, A. Khain, D. Axisa, P. Pradeep-Kumar, R. S. Maheshkumar, J. R. Kulkarni and B. N. Goswami

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016837

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      Key Points

      • Small droplets in the monsoon cloud increases dispersion
      • Large droplets form in adiabatic parcels
      • Droplet dispersion is well correlated with width in monsoon clouds
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      Oxidative aging of mixed oleic acid/sodium chloride aerosol particles

      Benjamin J. Dennis-Smither, Rachael E. H. Miles and Jonathan P. Reid

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018163

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      Key Points

      • Detailed measurements of kinetics of evolving particle properties during aging
      • Branching to involatile products and vapor pressures of volatile products
      • Changes in refractive index and hygroscopicity and kinetics of water uptake
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      Sensitivity of scattering and absorbing aerosol direct radiative forcing to physical climate factors

      Ilissa B. Ocko, V. Ramaswamy, Paul Ginoux, Yi Ming and Larry W. Horowitz

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018019

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      Key Points

      • Clouds halve sulfate direct radiative forcing
      • Clouds almost double black carbon direct radiative forcing
      • Relative humidity increases sulfate forcing by 50%
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      Aerosol climatology in an Alpine valley

      Sigrid Wuttke, Axel Kreuter and Mario Blumthaler

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017854

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      Key Points

      • Innsbruck's monthly mean AOD at 500 nm is 0.08 in winter and 0.17 in spring
      • A fine mode fraction of more than 70% is observed on 93% of the days
      • Saharan dust events and presence of volcanic ash are detected and discussed
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      Climate impacts of ice nucleation

      A. Gettelman, X. Liu, D. Barahona, U. Lohmann and C. Chen

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017950

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      Key Points

      • Simulated anthropogenic aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds are +0.3 Wm-2
      • Effects reduce the indirect effect of liquid and ice clouds (1.3 Wm-2) by 20%
      • Indirect effect of anthropogenic black carbon is not significant (-0.06Wm-2)
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      Aerosol formation in basaltic lava fountaining: Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

      Evgenia Ilyinskaya, Robert S. Martin and Clive Oppenheimer

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016811

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      Key Points

      • Aerosol sampled in lava fountaining at Eyjafjallajokull, <2 min from emission
      • Two unusual features: fine particle size and chloride-dominated composition
      • Efficiency of sulfate formation found to correlate with the eruption vigor
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      Analyzing the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption using satellite remote sensing, lidar and WRF-Chem dispersion and tracking model

      P. W. Webley, T. Steensen, M. Stuefer, G. Grell, S. Freitas and M. Pavolonis

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016817

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      Key Points

      • Modeling of airborne volcanic ash concentrations
      • Validation/comparison with satellite and ground observations
      • Significance of source parameters on volcanic ash modeling
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      Optical properties and radiative forcing of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash layer observed over Lille, France, in 2010

      Y. Derimian, O. Dubovik, D. Tanre, P. Goloub, T. Lapyonok and A. Mortier

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016815

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      Key Points

      • The derived ash optical model and forcing relied on AERONET column observations
      • Uncertainties in the derived ash aerosol model and forcing are evaluated
      • The indicated higher sensitivity of phase function to aerosol mixture assumption
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      In situ observations of volcanic ash clouds from the FAAM aircraft during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010

      Ben Johnson, Kate Turnbull, Phil Brown, Rachel Burgess, James Dorsey, Anthony J. Baran, Helen Webster, Jim Haywood, Richard Cotton, Z. Ulanowski, Evelyn Hesse, Alan Woolley and Philip Rosenberg

      Article first published online: 26 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016760

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      Key Points

      • Assessing the risk of volcanic ash to aviation
      • Validating ash forecasts from dispersion models
      • Providing key physical/optical parameters for ash remote sensing
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      A comparison of atmospheric dispersion model predictions with observations of SO2 and sulphate aerosol from volcanic eruptions

      Imogen P. C. Heard, Alistair J. Manning, James M. Haywood, Claire Witham, Alison Redington, Andy Jones, Lieven Clarisse and Adam Bourassa

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016791

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      Key Points

      • Volcanic SO2 and sulphate aerosol are modeled using the NAME dispersion model
      • NAME results compare well with observations despite many uncertainties in both
      • NAME shows promise as a tool for modeling SO2 and sulphate from volcanoes
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      Sensitivity analysis of dispersion modeling of volcanic ash from Eyjafjallajökull in May 2010

      B. J. Devenish, P. N. Francis, B. T. Johnson, R. S. J. Sparks and D. J. Thomson

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016782

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      Key Points

      • Modeling of volcanic ash dispersion in the atmosphere
      • Comparison of model results with satellite and aircraft observations
      • Estimate of distal fine ash fraction
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      Satellite remote sensing analysis of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud over the North Sea during 4–18 May 2010

      Sundar A. Christopher, Nan Feng, Aaron Naeger, Ben Johnson and Franco Marenco

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016850

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      Key Points

      • We analyze spectral signatures of volcanic ash
      • Compare satellite with aircraft data
      • Assess radiative forcing of volcanic ash
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      A new application of a multifrequency submillimeter radiometer in determining the microphysical and macrophysical properties of volcanic plumes: A sensitivity study

      Anthony J. Baran

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016781

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      Key Points

      • Sensitivity of submillimeter frequencies to aerosol
      • Frequencies sensitive to altitude, atmospheric state, effective diameter, mass
      • Important to determine the refractive index of ash at submillimeter frequencies
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      Simulated volcanic ash imagery: A method to compare NAME ash concentration forecasts with SEVIRI imagery for the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in 2010

      S. C. Millington, R. W. Saunders, P. N. Francis and H. N. Webster

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016770

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      Key Points

      • Atmospheric dispersion model output can be used to simulate satellite imagery
      • Location of forecast ash cloud can be validated against satellite observations
      • Aids understanding of the properties of ash and factors affecting imagery
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      CALIOP observations of the transport of ash from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April 2010

      D. M. Winker, Z. Liu, A. Omar, J. Tackett and D. Fairlie

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016499

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      Key Points

      • Remote sensing of volcanic ash using satellite lidar
      • Observation of the dispersion of volcanic aerosols
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      Eyjafjallajökull ash concentrations derived from both lidar and modeling

      Patrick Chazette, Marc Bocquet, Philippe Royer, Victor Winiarek, Jean-Christophe Raut, Philippe Labazuy, Mathieu Gouhier, Mélody Lardier and Jean-Pierre Cariou

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD015755

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      Key Points

      • Assessment of the ash plume mass concentration
      • Comparison between lidar and modeling
      • Retrieval of the optical properties of the ash plume
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      A case study of observations of volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption: 2. Airborne and satellite radiative measurements

      Stuart M. Newman, Lieven Clarisse, Daniel Hurtmans, Franco Marenco, Ben Johnson, Kate Turnbull, Stephan Havemann, Anthony J. Baran, Debbie O'Sullivan and Jim Haywood

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016780

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      Key Points

      • This case study comprises a unique data set of airborne/satellite observations
      • Airborne ash properties are used to test fundamental radiative transfer
      • We independently validate satellite ash retrieval algorithm for the first time
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      A case study of observations of volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption: 1. In situ airborne observations

      Kate Turnbull, Ben Johnson, Franco Marenco, Jim Haywood, Andreas Minikin, Bernadett Weinzierl, Hans Schlager, Ulrich Schumann, Susan Leadbetter and Alan Woolley

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016688

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      Key Points

      • In situ measurements of volcanic ash over the UK during 17 May 2010
      • Comparison of measurements by two aircraft, FAAM and DLR Falcon
      • Measurements of volcanic ash optical properties
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      Performance assessment of a volcanic ash transport model mini-ensemble used for inverse modeling of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

      N. I. Kristiansen, A. Stohl, A. J. Prata, N. Bukowiecki, H. Dacre, S. Eckhardt, S. Henne, M. C. Hort, B. T. Johnson, F. Marenco, B. Neininger, O. Reitebuch, P. Seibert, D. J. Thomson, H. N. Webster and B. Weinzierl

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016844

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      Key Points

      • The source parameters of volcanic emissions are crucial for ash forecasts
      • The source parameters can be substantially improved by assimilating observations
      • The simulated ash transport is improved with new source term estimates
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      Modeling the resuspension of ash deposited during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in spring 2010

      S. J. Leadbetter, M. C. Hort, S. von Löwis, K. Weber and C. S. Witham

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016802

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      Key Points

      • A forecast of resuspension of recently deposited volcanic ash is investigated
      • Model predictions compare well with observations of resuspended ash
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      Retrieval of physical properties of volcanic ash using Meteosat: A case study from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

      Peter N. Francis, Michael C. Cooke and Roger W. Saunders

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016788

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      Key Points

      • New techniques for detection and physical property retrieval of volcanic ash
      • Demonstration of strong sensitivity to refractive index
      • Validation against independent data
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      Operational prediction of ash concentrations in the distal volcanic cloud from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

      H. N. Webster, D. J. Thomson, B. T. Johnson, I. P. C. Heard, K. Turnbull, F. Marenco, N. I. Kristiansen, J. Dorsey, A. Minikin, B. Weinzierl, U. Schumann, R. S. J. Sparks, S. C. Loughlin, M. C. Hort, S. J. Leadbetter, B. J. Devenish, A. J. Manning, C. S. Witham, J. M. Haywood and B. W. Golding

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016790

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      Key Points

      • A method for forecasting peak volcanic ash concentrations is described
      • Method validated using observations from the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption
      • Uncertainties in modeled ash concentrations are numerous and large
  2. Climate and Dynamics

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Climate and Dynamics
    4. Composition and Chemistry
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      Long-term changes in stratospheric age spectra in the 21st century in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM)

      Feng Li, Darryn W. Waugh, Anne R. Douglass, Paul A. Newman, Susan E. Strahan, Jun Ma, J. Eric Nielsen and Qing Liang

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017905

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      Key Points

      • Long-term changes in age spectra are characterized
      • Processes that cause the decrease of the mean age are identified
      • Long-term changes in isentropic mixing are investigated
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      The added value to global model projections of climate change by dynamical downscaling: A case study over the continental U.S. using the GISS-ModelE2 and WRF models

      P. N. Racherla, D. T. Shindell and G. S. Faluvegi

      Article first published online: 27 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018091

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      Key Points

      • RCMs are used for climate change studies
      • Their skill is limited finally by that of the driving global model
      • Highest priority should be given to improving the skill of AOGCMs
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      A radiance-based method for estimating uncertainties in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) land surface temperature product

      Glynn C. Hulley and Simon J. Hook

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018102

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      Key Points

      • Uncertainties in hyperspectral resolution sensor LST products are unknown
      • A radiance-based method has been established to estimate LST uncertainties
      • AIRS LST uncertainties are highest over deserts
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      Potential for bias in 21st century semiempirical sea level projections

      S. Jevrejeva, J. C. Moore and A. Grinsted

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017704

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      Key Points

      • We project sl rise of 73 cm by 2100 compared with 53 cm from climate models
      • Steric sea level simulation in our study is in agreement with outputs from GCMs
      • We project twice larger melting from glaciers by 2100 than previous studies
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      Diurnal variations in convective storm activity over contiguous North China during the warm season based on radar mosaic climatology

      Mingxuan Chen, Yingchun Wang, Feng Gao and Xian Xiao

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018158

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      Key Points

      • Radar climatology reveals diurnal variation of convective storms over North China
      • Close relationship between storm activity and topography is highlighted
      • Diurnal storm frequency has two comparable peaks in warm season and JJA months
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      Identifying the causes of the poor decadal climate prediction skill over the North Pacific

      V. Guemas, F. J. Doblas-Reyes, F. Lienert, Y. Soufflet and H. Du

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018004

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      Key Points

      • The decadal climate prediction skill is particularly low in the North Pacific
      • Two major warmings around 1963 and 1968 are missed by the forecast systems
      • Their failure is most likely due to their ocean stratification biases
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      Climate variability and precipitation isotope relationships in the Mediterranean region

      M. J. Fischer and D. Mattey

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018010

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      Key Points

      • Multiple climate patterns influence Mediterranean precipitation isotopes
      • Identification and inference of coupled patterns using multivariate regression
      • Two patterns explain 50% of the shared variance in SLP and water isotope fields
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      Examining vegetation feedbacks on global warming in the Community Earth System Model

      Bing Pu and Robert E. Dickinson

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017623

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      Key Points

      • Vegetation feedbacks are found to amplify CO2 radiative warming in the CESM
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      Water vapor transport for summer precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau: Multidata set analysis

      Lei Feng and Tianjun Zhou

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017012

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      Key Points

      • The climate mean water vapor transport is examined
      • The interannual variability of water vapor transport is examined
      • Compare the results by using mutiple data sets
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      Spatial patterns of soil n-alkaneδD values on the Tibetan Plateau: Implications for monsoon boundaries and paleoelevation reconstructions

      Yan Bai, Xiaomin Fang and Qian Tian

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017803

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      Key Points

      • Spatial patterns of soil deltaDwax values across the Tibetan Plateau
      • The boundary of the westerlies and summer monsoonal moisture
      • The impact of mixing continental and monsoon-derived moisture on paleoelevation
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      High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder observations of the gravity wave-driven elevated stratopause in 2006

      J. A. France, V. L. Harvey, M. J. Alexander, C. E. Randall and J. C. Gille

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017958

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      Key Points

      • Demonstrates the vertical range over which HIRDLS temperatures are reliable
      • HIRDLS captures the evolution of mesospheric temperature patterns
      • HIRDLS gravity and planetary waves are shown during 2006 SSW
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      Modeling land-climate coupling in Europe: Impact of land surface representation on climate variability and extremes

      R. Lorenz, E. L. Davin and S. I. Seneviratne

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017755

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      Key Points

      • Sophisticated land surface models in RCMs reduce biases in climate variability
      • Sophisticated land surface models in RCMs reduce biases in temperature extremes
      • Representation of land-climate coupling is improved with sophisticated LSM
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      Combining the strengths of statistical and dynamical modeling approaches for forecasting Australian seasonal rainfall

      Andrew Schepen, Q. J. Wang and David E. Robertson

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018011

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      Key Points

      • Statistical and dynamical seasonal rainfall forecasting models have unique skill
      • Statistical and dynamical models are merged through Bayesian model averaging
      • Forecast merging improves spatial and temporal coverage of skillfulness
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      The detection of atmospheric rivers in atmospheric reanalyses and their links to British winter floods and the large-scale climatic circulation

      David A. Lavers, Gabriele Villarini, Richard P. Allan, Eric F. Wood and Andrew J. Wade

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018027

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      Key Points

      • Develop algorithm for atmospheric river detection in atmospheric reanalyses
      • Link identified ARs with largest winter floods in nine British basins
      • Connect atmospheric river frequency with large-scale climate variability
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      On the quantification of oceanic rainfall using spaceborne sensors

      Ali Behrangi, Matthew Lebsock, Sun Wong and Bjorn Lambrigtsen

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017979

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      Key Points

      • Combined CloudSat and TRMM PR rain are used to analyze oceanic rainfall
      • Quasi-global oceanic mean rain rate is about 3.05 mm/d
      • Significant fraction of rain is missed by various rain measuring sensors
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      Atmospheric gravity wave effects on polar mesospheric clouds: A comparison of numerical simulations from CARMA 2D with AIM observations

      A. Chandran, D. W. Rusch, G. E. Thomas, S. E. Palo, G. Baumgarten, E. J. Jensen and A. W. Merkel

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017794

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      Key Points

      • CIPS PMC images show rapid variation in albedo in 90 minutes over same region
      • Long period large horizontal wavelength AGW produce rapid PMC albedo variation
      • Seasonal variation in PMC albedo is reproduced using short and long period waves
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      Comparing two methods to estimate the sensitivity of regional climate simulations to tropical SST anomalies

      Wei Li, Chris E. Forest and Joseph Barsugli

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017186

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      Key Points

      • The RPM method is about 12x more computationally efficient than the patch method
      • The RPM and patch methods provide consistent results
      • Both methods can reconstruct climate change at global scales and in the tropics
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      Evidence for flash floods over deserts from loss of coherence in InSAR imagery

      K. Schepanski, T. J. Wright and P. Knippertz

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017580

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      Key Points

      • Flash floods play an important role for sediment transport in arid regions
      • Fluvial sediments are important dust sources
      • Decorrelation in interferograms increases with rain indicating sediment changes
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      A comparison of the interannual variability in atmospheric angular momentum and length-of-day using multiple reanalysis data sets

      Houk Paek and Huei-Ping Huang

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018105

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      Key Points

      • Agreement in the interannual variability among reanalyses
      • Close match between angular momentum and length-of-day
      • Correlation with tropical SST is consistent among the reanalyses
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      The impact of the atmosphere on the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption plume

      G. N. Petersen, H. Bjornsson and P. Arason

      Article first published online: 6 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016762

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      Key Points

      • Observed impact of atmosphere on explosive volcanic plume
      • The unusual weather situation of spring 2010
      • Observed impact of stability and buoyancy on meso to micro scale
  3. Composition and Chemistry

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Climate and Dynamics
    4. Composition and Chemistry
    1. You have free access to this content
      Optimized regional and interannual variability of lightning in a global chemical transport model constrained by LIS/OTD satellite data

      Lee T. Murray, Daniel J. Jacob, Jennifer A. Logan, Rynda C. Hudman and William J. Koshak

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017934

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      Key Points

      • Regional scaling may be used to constrain IAV in lightning to satellite in model
      • Tropical lightning correlates to ENSO activity over 1998-2010, not solar cycle
      • IAV in lightning NOx emissions is comparable to that from biomass burning
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      Inverse carbon dioxide flux estimates for the Netherlands

      A. G. C. A. Meesters, L. F. Tolk, W. Peters, R. W. A. Hutjes, O. S. Vellinga, J. A. Elbers, A. T. Vermeulen, S. van der Laan, R. E. M. Neubert, H. A. J. Meijer and A. J. Dolman

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017797

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      Key Points

      • Fluxes of CO2 for the Netherlands are calculated by atmospheric inversion
      • Inverted CO2 fluxes for Netherlands are validated with aircraft measurements
      • CO2 uptake for Netherlands appears larger than FLUXNET-calibrated model predicts
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      Direct measurements of the seasonality of emission factors from savanna fires in northern Australia

      C. P. Meyer, G. D. Cook, F. Reisen, T. E. L. Smith, M. Tattaris, J. Russell-Smith, S. W. Maier, C. P. Yates and M. J. Wooster

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017671

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      Key Points

      • Methane emission factors from savanna fires do not vary seasonally
      • Methane emission factors vary across fuel types and vegetation types
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      Numerical simulation of the lightning electromagnetic fields along a rough and ocean-land mixed propagation path

      Qilin Zhang, Xiaoqin Jing, Jing Yang, Dongshuai Li and Xiao Tang

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017851

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      Key Points

      • Effect of the rough ocean-land mixed path on electromagnetic fields are analyzed
      • The frequency spectrum of this mixed path on electromagnetic fields are analyzed
      • Effects of the rough land on the field are much more than that of the ocean
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      Ozone dynamics and snow-atmosphere exchanges during ozone depletion events at Barrow, Alaska

      Detlev Helmig, Patrick Boylan, Bryan Johnson, Sam Oltmans, Chris Fairall, Ralf Staebler, Andrew Weinheimer, John Orlando, David J. Knapp, Denise D. Montzka, Frank Flocke, Udo Frieß, Holger Sihler and Paul B. Shepson

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017531

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      Key Points

      • Ozone during ozone depletion events is at several 100 ppt levels
      • Ozone surface fluxes are low
      • BrO and ozone show correlation at sub-ppbv ozone levels
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      Variabilities in ozone at a semi-urban site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain region: Association with the meteorology and regional processes

      Narendra Ojha, Manish Naja, K. P. Singh, T. Sarangi, R. Kumar, S. Lal, M. G. Lawrence, T. M. Butler and H. C. Chandola

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017716

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      Key Points

      • First detailed analysis of seasonal variation in surface ozone over the IGP region
      • Influence of pollution from IGP to the Himalayas via boundary layer evolution
      • Ozone seasonality supplemented with spaceborne data and model results
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      Improving the accuracy of SO2column densities and emission rates obtained from upward-looking UV-spectroscopic measurements of volcanic plumes by taking realistic radiative transfer into account

      Christoph Kern, Tim Deutschmann, Cynthia Werner, A. Jeff Sutton, Tamar Elias and Peter J. Kelly

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017936

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      Key Points

      • Description of new technique for more accurate SO2 column density retrieval
      • Realistic three-dimensional radiative transfer is accounted for
      • SO2 emission rate at Kilauea was found to be higher than previously estimated
    8. You have free access to this content
      Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash concentrations determined using Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager measurements

      A. J. Prata and A. T. Prata

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016800

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      Key Points

      • Quantitative satellite retrievals for volcanic ash are presented and validated
      • A new ash concentration chart is presented
      • A new concept for ash thresholds based on dosages is introduced
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      Volcanic SO2, BrO and plume height estimations using GOME-2 satellite measurements during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in May 2010

      M. Rix, P. Valks, N. Hao, D. Loyola, H. Schlager, H. Huntrieser, J. Flemming, U. Koehler, U. Schumann and A. Inness

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016718

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      Key Points

      • SO2 and BrO in the eruption plume of Eyjafjallajokull using GOME-2
      • Direct retreival of the SO2 plume height from GOME-2 measurements
      • Comparison of GOME-2 data with model simulations, Falcon and Brewer observations
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      Improved detection of sulphur dioxide in volcanic plumes using satellite-based hyperspectral infrared measurements: Application to the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption

      J. C. Walker, E. Carboni, A. Dudhia and R. G. Grainger

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016810

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      Key Points

      • Eyjafjallajokull SO2 was difficult to measure from space
      • Volcanic plume can be clearly distinguished using MetOp IASI
      • SO2 detection limit is order of magnitude better than thought previously

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