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Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012)

Cover image for Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012)

27 February 2012

Volume 117, Issue D4

Currently known as: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

  1. Aerosol and Clouds

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Climate and Dynamics
    4. Composition and Chemistry
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      Analysis of cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer from CALIPSO and MLS data: A water perspective

      Tao Wang and Andrew E. Dessler

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016442

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      Key Points

      • Convective cirrus occur frequently at central Africa, W. Pacific, and S. America
      • Convective fraction of cirrus is higher at the tropopause, and higher in DJF
      • At least ~30% of cirrus in the TTL are definitely of convective origin
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      Aerosol and cloud feedbacks on surface energy balance over selected regions of the Indian subcontinent

      Gayatri Urankar, T. V. Prabha, G. Pandithurai, P. Pallavi, D. Achuthavarier and B. N. Goswami

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016363

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      Key Points

      • Aerosol and cloud feedback on the energy budget over the Indian subcontinent
      • Assesment of energy budget using MERRA and CFSR data
      • Study of surface energy budget over Indian subregions using reanalyses products
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      Lightning morphology and impulse charge moment change of high peak current negative strokes

      Gaopeng Lu, Steven A. Cummer, Richard J. Blakeslee, Stephanie Weiss and William H. Beasley

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016890

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      Key Points

      • Identified four lightning types for negative strokes with high peak currents
      • Presented negative impulse charge transfer distribution for each lightning type
      • Identified the lightning morphology likely associated with negative sprites
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      Simulation of South Asian aerosols for regional climate studies

      Vijayakumar S. Nair, Fabien Solmon, Filippo Giorgi, Laura Mariotti, S. Suresh Babu and K. Krishna Moorthy

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016711

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      Key Points

      • RegCM4 simulated spatio-temporal variability of AOD over South Asia well
      • Model largely underestimated surface BC during nighttime
      • Model overestimates the vertical transport under stable boundary layer
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      The roles of temperature and water vapor at different stages of the polar mesospheric cloud season

      P. P. Rong, J. M. Russell III, M. E. Hervig and S. M. Bailey

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016464

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      Key Points

      • Temperature controls the start and end of the PMC season
      • Water vapor dominantly controls the PMC ice mass density variation
      • The long term trends of PMC brightness and water vapor should be consistent
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      Hygroscopicity frequency distributions of secondary organic aerosols

      S. R. Suda, M. D. Petters, A. Matsunaga, R. C. Sullivan, P. J. Ziemann and S. M. Kreidenweis

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016823

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      Key Points

      • Hygroscopicity decreases with decreasing compound polarity
      • SOA consists of a continuum of products with 0 less than kappa less than ~0.4
      • SOA kappa-values can be reconstructed by integrating over the HPLC chromatogram
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      Optical properties and chemical composition of aerosol particles at an urban location: An estimation of the aerosol mass scattering and absorption efficiencies

      G. Titos, I. Foyo-Moreno, H. Lyamani, X. Querol, A. Alastuey and L. Alados-Arboledas

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016671

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      Key Points

      • Chemical composition and optical properties of urban aerosols have been analyzed
      • Non marine sulfate, nitrate and OM presented high mass scattering efficiencies
      • Carbonaceous particles dominated the absorption process
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      The Shannon information content of hyperspectral shortwave cloud albedo measurements: Quantification and practical applications

      Odele Coddington, Peter Pilewskie and Tomislava Vukicevic

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016771

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      Key Points

      • Quantifying the Shannon information content of hyperspectral cloud albedo
      • Using information content to quantitatively analyze a retrieval statistic
      • Determine the cumulative information in a retrieval
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      Properties of Sarychev sulphate aerosols over the Arctic

      N. T. O'Neill, C. Perro, A. Saha, G. Lesins, T. J. Duck, E. W. Eloranta, G. J. Nott, A. Hoffman, M. L. Karumudi, C. Ritter, A. Bourassa, I. Abboud, S. A. Carn and V. Savastiouk

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016838

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      Key Points

      • Stratospheric summer aerosols over the Arctic had effective radius ~0.28 um
      • Stratospheric summertime AODs at 500 nm were between 0.03 and 0.05
      • The e-folding times of stratospheric aerosols were ~4 months
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      A solar escalator: Observational evidence of the self-lifting of smoke and aerosols by absorption of solar radiation in the February 2009 Australian Black Saturday plume

      A. T. J. de Laat, D. C. Stein Zweers, R. Boers and O. N. E. Tuinder

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017016

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      Key Points

      • Absorbing aerosols can cause their own lift by absorption of solar radiation
      • First observational evidence that this process acts on a large scale
      • Radiative modeling based on aerosol optical properties supports this idea
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      Study of the correlation between columnar aerosol burden, suspended matter at ground and chemical components in a background European environment

      Víctor Estellés, José A. Martínez-Lozano, Jorge Pey, Michaël Sicard, Xavier Querol, Anna R. Esteve, María P. Utrillas, Mar Sorribas, Gotzon Gangoiti, Andrés Alastuey and Francesc Rocadenbosch

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016356

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      Key Points

      • The relationship between ground and columnar aerosol burdens has been studied
      • The influence of the mixing layer and aerosol chemistry has been analyzed
      • A remote transport pollution episode was identified and discussed
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      Seasonal variations of Antarctic clouds observed by CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites

      Loknath Adhikari, Zhien Wang and Min Deng

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016719

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      Key Points

      • CloudSat and CALIPSO data sets are ideal to study polar clouds
      • Cloud occurrence is higher in summer, but deep clouds are more frequent in winter
      • Effective radii are larger and IWC is greater in summer than in winter
  2. Climate and Dynamics

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Climate and Dynamics
    4. Composition and Chemistry
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      Climatology and characteristics of stratospheric sudden warmings in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

      Laura de la Torre, Rolando R. Garcia, David Barriopedro and Amal Chandran

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016840

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      Key Points

      • Compare model climatology to observations
      • New version of WACCM agrees well with observations for SSW, relation to blocking
      • Elevated stratopause events are also well reproduced
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      Evaluation of Polar WRF forecasts on the Arctic System Reanalysis Domain: 2. Atmospheric hydrologic cycle

      Aaron B. Wilson, David H. Bromwich and Keith M. Hines

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016765

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      Key Points

      • The atmospheric hydrologic cycle of Polar WRF 3.1.1 is evaluated
      • Summer precipitation is overpredicted due to excessive convection
      • Too few clouds leads to excessive shortwave and a deficit in longwave radiation
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      Large-scale circulation features in the tropical western Pacific and their representation in climate models

      Ian N. Smith, Aurel F. Moise and Robert A. Colman

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016667

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      Key Points

      • The climate of the western Pacific is monsoon-dominated
      • Model projections favor increased rainfall, but little change to the winds
      • Model performance at simulating the monsoon does not alter the projections
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      Climate model simulated changes in temperature extremes due to land cover change

      F. B. Avila, A. J. Pitman, M. G. Donat, L. V. Alexander and G. Abramowitz

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016382

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      Key Points

      • Temperature extremes indices are affected by LULCC
      • LULCC may locally mask or amplify impact of increasing CO2 on extreme indices
      • Results offer way towards clearer, more robust attribution of CO2 impact
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      Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model simulations

      D. D. Turner, A. Merrelli, D. Vimont and E. J. Mlawer

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016440

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      Key Points

      • Field data suggest modeled water vapor continuum absorption too strong in far-IR
      • Impact on CESM simulations show small but significant differences
      • CESM model adjusted dynamically to change in radiation
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      Detecting and attributing nonlinear anthropogenic regional warming in southeastern Australia

      Roger N. Jones

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016328

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      Key Points

      • Regional warming over SE Australia can be separately attributed to cc & cv
      • Anthropogenic component of regional warming occurs as step changes
      • Climate models simulate similar dynamics
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      The El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Modoki signal in the stratosphere

      I. Zubiaurre and N. Calvo

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016690

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      Key Points

      • Warming in the SH polar stratosphere during El Nino Modoki events
      • No significant signal in the NH during El Nino Modoki events
      • Differences between El Nino Modoki and canonical El Nino
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      A climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model

      Roman Olson, Ryan Sriver, Marlos Goes, Nathan M. Urban, H. Damon Matthews, Murali Haran and Klaus Keller

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016620

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      Key Points

      • We provide estimates of key climate parameters using a model with a 3D ocean
      • Our results are consistent with most previous studies
      • Climate sensitivity pdf is highly correlated with aerosol effects
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      Assessment of the long-lead probabilistic prediction for the Asian summer monsoon precipitation (1983–2011) based on the APCC multimodel system and a statistical model

      Soo-Jin Sohn, Young-Mi Min, June-Yi Lee, Chi-Yung Tam, In-Sik Kang, Bin Wang, Joong-Bae Ahn and Toshio Yamagata

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016308

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      Key Points

      • Probabilistic multimodel has potential for long-lead Asian monsoon prediction
      • Dynamical and statistical forecast skills are high after mature phase of ENSO
      • Dynamical model is better tool for capturing the atypical ENSO teleconnection
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      The preconditioning of major sudden stratospheric warmings

      S. Bancalá, K. Krüger and M. Giorgetta

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016769

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      Key Points

      • Analysis of the preconditioning of major SSWs by different planetary waves
      • Planetary wave dynamics of wavenumber-1 and wavenumber-2 major SSWs
      • Influence of tropospheric blockings on wavenumber-1 and wavenumber-2 major SSWs
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      Inter-comparison of 11-year solar cycle response in mesospheric ozone and temperature obtained by HALOE satellite data and HAMMONIA model

      G. Beig, S. Fadnavis, H. Schmidt and Guy P. Brasseur

      Article first published online: 6 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD015697

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      Key Points

      • Solar signal in mesospheric O3 and T from model simulations and satellite data
      • Solar cycle effects on low and mid latitudes and their inter-comparison
      • Influence of solar cycle on O3 and T diurnal cycle
  3. Composition and Chemistry

    1. Top of page
    2. Aerosol and Clouds
    3. Climate and Dynamics
    4. Composition and Chemistry
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      Evaluation and improvements of two community models in simulating dry deposition velocities for peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) over a coniferous forest

      Zhiyong Wu, Xuemei Wang, Andrew A. Turnipseed, Fei Chen, Leiming Zhang, Alex B. Guenther, Thomas Karl, L. G. Huey, Dev Niyogi, Beicheng Xia and Kiran Alapaty

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016751

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      Key Points

      • The primary uptake of PAN by the vegetative surface is through the stomata
      • Noah-GEM had a smaller bias of Vd(PAN) due to its more realistic simulated Rs
      • Cuticle resistance is another key parameter for PAN deposition
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      Observation of atmospheric oxygen/nitrogen ratio aboard a cargo ship using gas chromatography/thermal conductivity detector

      Hiroaki Yamagishi, Yasunori Tohjima, Hitoshi Mukai, Yukihiro Nojiri, Chihiro Miyazaki and Keiichi Katsumata

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016939

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      Key Points

      • Development of shipboard measurements of atmospheric oxygen/nitrogen ratio
      • Latitudinal distribution of atmospheric potential oxygen over the Pacific
      • Characterization of sources of carbon dioxide by using O2:CO2 exchange ratio
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      The rates of sea salt sulfatization in the atmosphere and surface snow of inland Antarctica

      Yoshinori Iizuka, Akira Tsuchimoto, Yu Hoshina, Toshimitsu Sakurai, Margareta Hansson, Torbjörn Karlin, Koji Fujita, Fumio Nakazawa, Hideaki Motoyama and Shuji Fujita

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016378

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      Key Points

      • This paper measures the sulfatization rates of sea salt in inland Antarctica
      • We estimate that about 90% of the initial sea salt sulfatized in the atmosphere
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      Shipboard measurements and modeling of the distribution of CH4 and 13CH4 in the western Pacific

      T. Bromley, W. Allan, R. Martin, S. E. Mikaloff Fletcher, D. C. Lowe, H. Struthers and R. Moss

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016494

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      Key Points

      • We present observations of CH4 and its 13C/12C isotopic ratio in the western Pacific
      • The data show strong variability that is largely driven by atmospheric transport
      • While ENSO plays a major role in this variability, it is not the main driver
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      Boundary layer versus free tropospheric CO budget and variability over the United States during summertime

      A. Boynard, Gabriele G. Pfister and David P. Edwards

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016416

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      Key Points

      • Good agreement between regional model and different observations
      • Vertical distribution depends on local sources, chemistry and transport
      • Surface variability observations from space require multispectral retrievals
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      Precision estimate for Odin-OSIRIS limb scatter retrievals

      A. E. Bourassa, C. A. McLinden, A. F. Bathgate, B. J. Elash and D. A. Degenstein

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016976

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      Key Points

      • We present an algorithm for estimating the precision of OSIRIS measurements
      • The algorithm is efficient and can be calculated for every measurement
      • This precision estimate is shown to agree very well with independent estimates
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      Hydrocarbon emissions characterization in the Colorado Front Range: A pilot study

      Gabrielle Pétron, Gregory Frost, Benjamin R. Miller, Adam I. Hirsch, Stephen A. Montzka, Anna Karion, Michael Trainer, Colm Sweeney, Arlyn E. Andrews, Lloyd Miller, Jonathan Kofler, Amnon Bar-Ilan, Ed J. Dlugokencky, Laura Patrick, Charles T. Moore Jr., Thomas B. Ryerson, Carolina Siso, William Kolodzey, Patricia M. Lang, Thomas Conway, Paul Novelli, Kenneth Masarie, Bradley Hall, Douglas Guenther, Duane Kitzis, John Miller, David Welsh, Dan Wolfe, William Neff and Pieter Tans

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016360

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      Key Points

      • Emissions from oil and gas operations in the Denver Julesburg Basin
      • Multispecies observations are used to interpret CH4 variability in NE Colorado
      • Atmospheric observations are used to evaluate bottom-up inventories
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      Atmosphere-ocean ozone fluxes during the TexAQS 2006, STRATUS 2006, GOMECC 2007, GasEx 2008, and AMMA 2008 cruises

      D. Helmig, E. K. Lang, L. Bariteau, P. Boylan, C. W. Fairall, L. Ganzeveld, J. E. Hare, J. Hueber and M. Pallandt

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD015955

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      Key Points

      • First ever ship-borne ocean ozone fluxes
      • First ozone flux measurements over the open ocean
      • Ozone fluxes are smaller than previous coastal measurements
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      Classification of Ascension Island and Natal ozonesondes using self-organizing maps

      Anders A. Jensen, Anne M. Thompson and F. J. Schmidlin

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD016573

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      Key Points

      • Self-organizing maps (SOM) classify tropospheric ozone profiles-FIRST time
      • Two Atlantic SHADOZ sites show mostly similar fire, convective signals
      • Nearly half of profiles diverge more than 1-sigma from simple averages
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      The existence of the edge region of the Antarctic stratospheric vortex

      Howard K. Roscoe, Wuhu Feng, Martyn P. Chipperfield, Miriam Trainic and Emily F. Shuckburgh

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD015940

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      Key Points

      • The existence of the edge region of the Antarctic vortex is confirmed
      • The new evidence for its existence is compelling
      • It is important because it could delay recovery of the ozone hole

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