Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

Cover image for Vol. 118 Issue 10

27 May 2013

Volume 118, Issue 10

Pages vi–vi, 3919–5064

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Regular Articles
    4. Correction
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
  2. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Regular Articles
    4. Correction
    1. Climate and Dynamics

      Impacts of global warming on Northern Hemisphere winter storm tracks in the CMIP5 model suite (pages 3919–3932)

      Timothy Paul Eichler, Natalie Gaggini and Zaitao Pan

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50286

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      Key Points

      • Storm frequency decreases in mid-latitudes due to global warming.
      • Global warming impact on intensity varies between ocean basins.
      • Models produce weaker storms than reanalysis data.
    2. A method for specifying atmospheric gravity wavefields for long-range infrasound propagation calculations (pages 3933–3943)

      D. P. Drob, D. Broutman, M. A. Hedlin, N. W. Winslow and R. G. Gibson

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018077

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      Key Points

      • A problem in infrasound is to explain observed near-field shadow zone signals
      • A method to represent gravity waves for infrasound calculations is provided
      • Infrasound ray-trace results are compared to observations from a seismic network
    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Stochastic seasonality of rainfall in New Zealand (pages 3944–3955)

      John Sansom, Peter Thomson and Trevor Carey-Smith

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50178

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      Key Points

      • NZ rainfall has seasonality but season change times vary from year-to-year
      • Significance testing against randomly generated dates confirms this view
      • Season change dates can be modeled as a 4 component Von Mises distribution
    4. Multi-model analysis of Northern Hemisphere winter blocking: Model biases and the role of resolution (pages 3956–3971)

      James A. Anstey, Paolo Davini, Lesley J. Gray, Tim J. Woollings, Neal Butchart, Chiara Cagnazzo, Bo Christiansen, Steven C. Hardiman, Scott M. Osprey and Shuting Yang

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50231

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      Key Points

      • CMIP5 models have large blocking biases and associated jet biases
      • Increased spatial resolution is associated with reduced blocking and jet biases
      • Vertical and horizontal resolution give blocking changes in different regions
    5. Assimilation of microwave brightness temperature in a land data assimilation system with multi-observation operators (pages 3972–3985)

      Binghao Jia, Xiangjun Tian, Zhenghui Xie, Jianguo Liu and Chunxiang Shi

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50377

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      Key Points

      • We developed a land data assimilation system with multi-observation operators
      • The impact of observation operators on assimilated results was investigated
      • A Bayesian model averaging scheme was used to enhance the assimilation skill
    6. A decade of energy and mass balance investigations on the glacier Kongsvegen, Svalbard (pages 3986–4000)

      F. Karner, F. Obleitner, T. Krismer, J. Kohler and W. Greuell

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018342

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      Key Points

      • Evaluation of a decadal meteorological record of an Arctic glacier
      • Use of SOMARS, validation of results, investigations of climate sensitiviy
      • Annual, monthly, daily consideration
    7. Attribution of observed historical near‒surface temperature variations to anthropogenic and natural causes using CMIP5 simulations (pages 4001–4024)

      Gareth S. Jones, Peter A. Stott and Nikolaos Christidis

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50239

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      Key Points

      • Latest dataset of historic temperatures compared with multi model ensemble
      • CMIP5 models have wider range of global mean warming than CMIP3 models
      • Multimodel attribution analysis shows greenhouse gases dominate warming
    8. A scPDSI-based global data set of dry and wet spells for 1901–2009 (pages 4025–4048)

      G. van der Schrier, J. Barichivich, K. R. Briffa and P. D. Jones

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50355

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      Key Points

      • Evidence for strong or widespread drying is not supported by this work
      • A new global dataset quantifying global drought and wet spells is released
      • Evapotranspiration and snowpack dynamics are treated realistically
    9. Changes in reference evapotranspiration across the Tibetan Plateau: Observations and future projections based on statistical downscaling (pages 4049–4068)

      Weiguang Wang, Wanqiu Xing, Quanxi Shao, Zhongbo Yu, Shizhang Peng, Tao Yang, Bin Yong, John Taylor and Vijay P. Singh

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50393

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      Key Points

      • Reveal reversal phenomenon of ET0 since 1994 and its dominated factor
      • Investigate the adaptability of SDSM for downscaling ET0 on the TP
      • Discuss the future change patterns of ET0 based on the projection results
    10. Meteorology and dust in the central Sahara: Observations from Fennec supersite-1 during the June 2011 Intensive Observation Period (pages 4069–4089)

      J. H. Marsham, M. Hobby, C. J. T. Allen, J. R. Banks, M. Bart, B. J. Brooks, C. Cavazos-Guerra, S. Engelstaedter, M. Gascoyne, A. R. Lima, J. V. Martins, J. B. McQuaid, A. O'Leary, B. Ouchene, A. Ouladichir, D. J. Parker, A. Saci, M. Salah-Ferroudj, M. C. Todd and R. Washington

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50211

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      Key Points

      • First detailed observations from the central Sahara (upper BL jet observed)
      • Most dust in moist air. Together, dust & cloud control surface energy balance
      • ~50% of dust uplift is nocturnal. ~30% from the LLJ and ~50% from haboobs
    11. Background conditions influence the decadal climate response to strong volcanic eruptions (pages 4090–4106)

      Davide Zanchettin, Oliver Bothe, Hans F. Graf, Stephan J. Lorenz, Juerg Luterbacher, Claudia Timmreck and Johann H. Jungclaus

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50229

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      Key Points

      • The background state affects the decadal climate response to volcanic eruptions
      • Background conditions actively influence the climate response mechanisms
      • North Atlantic/Arctic oceanic heat transport and sea ice are key factor
    12. Distinct impact of tropical SSTs on summer North Pacific high and western North Pacific subtropical high (pages 4107–4116)

      Kyung-Sook Yun, Sang-Wook Yeh and Kyung-Ja Ha

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50253

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      Key Points

      • IO warming and WP cooling induce the development of the WNPSH
      • IO warming-related summer EP cooling induces an enhanced NPH
      • IO warming and EP cooling generate a coupled pattern of NPH and WNPSH
    13. Mid-Holocene Asian summer climate and its responses to cold ocean surface simulated in the PMIP2 OAGCMs experiments (pages 4117–4128)

      Tao Wang and Huijun Wang

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50287

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      Key Points

      • Orbital forcings were prime drivers of 6 ka Asian summer climate changes
      • Influences from different ocean surfaces played a key role on Asian climate
      • South Asian Climate was more sensitive to orbital and oceanic forcings
    14. On the relation between large-scale circulation pattern and heavy rain events over the Hawaiian Islands: Recent trends and future changes (pages 4129–4141)

      Oliver Elison Timm, Mami Takahashi, Thomas W. Giambelluca and Henry F. Diaz

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50314

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      Key Points

      • Large-scale circulation can be downscaled onto local heavy rain frequencies
      • Inhomogeneity in daily reanalysis affect evaluation of climate trends
      • Negative trend in frequency of heavy rain events in Hawaii during 21st century
    15. Future changes in summertime precipitation amounts associated with topography in the Japanese islands (pages 4142–4153)

      Nobumitsu Tsunematsu, Koji Dairaku and Junpei Hirano

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50383

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      Key Points

      • Relationship between future changes in summertime precipitation and topography
      • Analyses of data from the three different regional climate models
      • Finding as to the large influence of topography on future precipitation changes
    16. A score-based method for assessing the performance of GCMs: A case study of southeastern Australia (pages 4154–4167)

      Guobin Fu, Zhaofei Liu, Stephen P Charles, Zongxue Xu and Zhijun Yao

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50269

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      Key Points

      • A score based method was developed to assess General Circulation Models (GCMs)
      • The assessment results provide information in selecting suitable GCMs
      • The method developed can easily be extended to different study region
    17. A climatology of polar winter stratopause warmings and associated planetary wave breaking (pages 4168–4180)

      K. Greer, J. P. Thayer and V. L. Harvey

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50289

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      Key Points

      • 20.5 year MetO climatology of middle atmospheric disturbances
      • Baroclinic instability associated with PWB in the upper stratosphere
      • Relationships between Stratopause warmings, PW activity, and SSWs
    18. Eastern U.S. summer streamflow during extreme phases of the North Atlantic oscillation (pages 4181–4193)

      Jill S. M. Coleman and Dagmar Budikova

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50326

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      Key Points

      • Eastern U.S. summer streamflow may be related to NAO up to 3 prior seasons.
      • Northeast U.S. has greatest potential for NAO-streamflow predictability.
      • Streamflow-NAO relationships may not be linear and are location dependent.
    19. Validation of the diurnal cycles in atmospheric reanalyses over Antarctic sea ice (pages 4194–4204)

      Esa-Matti Tastula, Timo Vihma, Edgar L. Andreas and Boris Galperin

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50336

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      Key Points

      • Diurnal cycles of surface fluxes vary among the different reanalyses.
      • Problems are related to both the amplitude and the shape of the cycle.
      • ERA-Interim yielded diurnal cycles closest to those observed.
    20. An observed negative trend in West Antarctic accumulation rates from 1975 to 2010: Evidence from new observed and simulated records (pages 4205–4216)

      Landon Burgener, Summer Rupper, Lora Koenig, Rick Forster, William F. Christensen, Jessica Williams, Michelle Koutnik, Clément Miège, Eric J. Steig, David Tingey, Durban Keeler and Laura Riley

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50362

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      Key Points

      • Significant negative accumulation trends from new West Antarctic firn cores
      • Tropical and high latitude atmospheric dynamics affect snow precipitation
      • Suite of model and reanalysis do not capture negative accumulation trend
    21. A comparison of tropospheric temperature changes over China revealed by multiple data sets (pages 4217–4230)

      Lixia Zhang and Tianjun Zhou

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50370

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      Key Points

      • China has warmed at 850hPa but cooled at 300hPa for 1958-2001.
      • Uncertainty is large at upper-troposphere before 1970 and after 1990.
      • HadAT2 shows a warming trend at 300hPa.
    22. Toward improved corrections for radiation-induced biases in radiosonde temperature observations (pages 4231–4243)

      Bomin Sun, Anthony Reale, Steven Schroeder, Dian J. Seidel and Bradley Ballish

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50369

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      Key Points

      • The analysis aims to facilitate improvements in radiosonde bias corrections
    23. Links between mesopause temperatures and ground-based VLF narrowband radio signals (pages 4244–4255)

      Israel Silber, Colin Price, Craig J. Rodger and Christos Haldoupis

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50379

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      Key Points

      • First observations of link between mesopause temperatures and VLF amplitudes
      • Increasing mesopause temperatures linked to decreasing VLF amplitudes
      • New method to estimate mesopause temperature using VLF measurements
    24. Impact of sea surface temperature trend on late summer Asian rainfall in the twentieth century (pages 4256–4266)

      Qiying Bian and Riyu Lu

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50386

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      Key Points

      • Global SST trend induce an enhanced WNPSH in late summer
      • Observed rainfall trend in tropical Asia is reproduced
      • Late summer rainfall in East Asia may increase under global SST trend
    25. Linear interference and the Northern Annular Mode response to tropical SST forcing: Sensitivity to model configuration (pages 4267–4279)

      Christopher G. Fletcher and Paul J. Kushner

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50385

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      Key Points

      • Linear interference explains NAM response to tropical forcing
      • Linear interference can dominate due to cancellation of nonlinear terms
      • No evidence for sensitivity of NAM response to model configuration
    26. A link between tropical intraseasonal variability and Arctic stratospheric ozone (pages 4280–4289)

      King-Fai Li, Baijun Tian, Ka-Kit Tung, Le Kuai, John R. Worden, Yuk L. Yung and Benjiman L. Slawski

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50391

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      Key Points

      • Intraseasonal signals of Arctic O3 (~10 DU) correlated with tropical influences
      • Teleconnection through barotropic propagation of planetary waves
      • Teleconnection in tracers to better predict air qualities at higher latitudes
    27. Interannual variability in the surface energy budget and evaporation over a large southern inland water in the United States (pages 4290–4302)

      Qianyu Zhang and Heping Liu

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50435

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      Key Points

      • How water surface energy budget responds to climate change remains limited
      • Frequent large wind events enhanced interannual variations in the energy fluxes
      • Changes in cold fronts due to climate change can amplify interannual variations
    28. Upper air temperature trends above Switzerland 1959–2011 (pages 4303–4317)

      E. Brocard, P. Jeannet, M. Begert, G. Levrat, R. Philipona, G. Romanens and S. C. Scherrer

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50438

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      Key Points

      • Summary of 53 years of radiosonde measurements in Payerne, Switzerland
    29. Tree ring–based seven-century drought records for the Western Himalaya, India (pages 4318–4325)

      Ram R. Yadav

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50265

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      Key Points

      • First drought records for the western Himalaya
      • Records show strong regional scale features
      • Droughts associated with large-scale Pacific Sea surface temperature anomalies
    30. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Global carbon budgets simulated by the Beijing Climate Center Climate System Model for the last century (pages 4326–4347)

      Tongwen Wu, Weiping Li, Jinjun Ji, Xiaoge Xin, Laurent Li, Zaizhi Wang, Yanwu Zhang, Jianglong Li, Fang Zhang, Min Wei, Xueli Shi, Fanghua Wu, Li Zhang, Min Chu, Weihua Jie, Yiming Liu, Fang Wang, Xiangwen Liu, Qiaoping Li, Min Dong, Xiaoyun Liang, Yang Gao and Jie Zhang

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50320

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      Key Points

      • To evaluate BCC_CSM in reproducing the global carbon cycle from 1850 to 2005
      • To quantify the interannual to long-term trend of carbon sources and sinks
      • To provide some discussions of BCC_CSM compared to other models
    31. What is the effect of unresolved internal climate variability on climate sensitivity estimates? (pages 4348–4358)

      R. Olson, R. Sriver, W. Chang, M. Haran, N. M. Urban and K. Keller

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50390

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      Key points

      • Internal climate variability is a key driver of climate sensitivity uncertainty
      • High climate sensitivities are especially difficult to estimate
    32. Links between multidecadal and interdecadal climatic oscillations in the North Atlantic and regional climate variability of northern France and England since the 17th century (pages 4359–4372)

      Bastien Dieppois, Alain Durand, Matthieu Fournier and Nicolas Massei

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50392

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      Key Points

      • Climate variability is analyzed in England and Northern France since 1650
      • Periods of enhanced multi-/interdecadal variability are detected
      • Co-oscillations with North-Atlantic climate changed over centuries
    33. Intensification of premonsoon tropical cyclones in the Bay of Bengal and its impacts on Myanmar (pages 4373–4384)

      Shih-Yu Wang, Brendan M. Buckley, Jin-Ho Yoon and Boniface Fosu

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50396

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      Key Points

      • Examine dynamic mechanism leading to intensification of monsoon trough
      • Increase of pre-monsoon precipitation and TCs over Myanmar
      • Attribute to increasing aerosol loading and GHGs
    34. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The role of deep convection and nocturnal low-level jets for dust emission in summertime West Africa: Estimates from convection-permitting simulations (pages 4385–4400)

      B. Heinold, P. Knippertz, J. H. Marsham, S. Fiedler, N. S. Dixon, K. Schepanski, B. Laurent and I. Tegen

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50402

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      Key Points

      • First quantification of W-African dust uplift by cold pools and LLJs in summer
      • Newly developed automated detection algorithm for LLJs and cold pools
      • LLJs and Cold pools each contribute 40% to West African dust emission in summer
    35. Simulation of boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations in the latest CMIP5 coupled GCMs (pages 4401–4420)

      C. T. Sabeerali, A. Ramu Dandi, Ashish Dhakate, Kiran Salunke, S. Mahapatra and Suryachandra A. Rao

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50403

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      Key Points

      • Current GCMs still have difficulties in simulating BSISO
      • ISO of SST and equatorial eastward propagation of convection assure better BSISO
      • MPI-ESM-LR is the best in representing the BSISOs among CMIP5 models
    36. Impact of the quasi-biweekly oscillation over the western North Pacific on East Asian subtropical monsoon during early summer (pages 4421–4434)

      Xiaolong Jia and Song Yang

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50422

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      Key Points

      • Quasi-biweekly oscillation modulates subtropical monsoon
      • Characteristics and effect on rainfall are phase dependent
      • The South Asian High is important for QBWO
    37. The importance of time-varying forcing for QBO modulation of the atmospheric 11 year solar cycle signal (pages 4435–4447)

      Katja Matthes, Kunihiko Kodera, Rolando R. Garcia, Yuhji Kuroda, Daniel R. Marsh and Karin Labitzke

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50424

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      Key Points

      • Solar response differs significantly during QBO phases
      • Modeled solar response in agreement with observations
      • Mechanism for solar-QBO interaction proposed
    38. Evaluation of volcanic aerosol impacts on atmospheric water vapor using CMIP3 and CMIP5 simulations (pages 4448–4457)

      Jingwan Li and Ashish Sharma

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50420

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      Key Points

      • GCMs overestimated the percentage of volcanic impacted global area
      • GCMs underestimated the amplitude of volcano-induced water vapor variability
      • GCMs simplified the temporal pattern of volcano-induced water vapor variability
    39. Observations of compact intracloud lightning discharges in the northernmost region (51°N) of China (pages 4458–4465)

      Fanchao Lü, Baoyou Zhu, Helin Zhou, Vladimir A. Rakov, Weiwei Xu and Zilong Qin

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50295

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      Key Points

      • The first experimental data on CIDs at higher latitudes are presented
      • No CIDs with −NBPs were observed during 2 year observation
      • CIDs in this area differ significantly from that in most lower latitude regions
    40. Evaluation of AMSR-E retrievals and GLDAS simulations against observations of a soil moisture network on the central Tibetan Plateau (pages 4466–4475)

      Yingying Chen, Kun Yang, Jun Qin, Long Zhao, Wenjun Tang and Menglei Han

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50301

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      Key Points

      • Installed a dense soil moisture monitoring network on central Tibetan Plateau
      • Evaluation of four AMSR-E retrieved soil moisture products
      • Evaluation of four GLDAS simulated soil moisture outputs
    41. Solar wind dynamic pressure effect on planetary wave propagation and synoptic-scale Rossby wave breaking (pages 4476–4493)

      Hua Lu, Christian Franzke, Olivia Martius, Martin J. Jarvis and Tony Phillips

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50374

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      Key Points

      • Northern circulation anomalies relate to changes of solar wind dynamic pressure
      • Descending mean flow circulation & EP-flux anomalies are dynamically consisten
      • Positive NAM & equatorward shift of RWB under high solar wind dynamic pressure
    42. Aerosol and Clouds

      Theoretical prediction of electric fields in wind-blown sand (pages 4494–4502)

      TianLi Bo, Huan Zhang, Wei Zhu and XiaoJing Zheng

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50155

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      Key points

      • It models the electric fields caused by variation of particle concentration.
      • The electric field varies with streamwise distance before reaching equilibrium.
      • Influences of wind speed and sand size on the electric field are investigated.
    43. Retrieval of cirrus properties by Sun photometry: A new perspective on an old issue (pages 4503–4520)

      Michal Segal-Rosenheimer, Philip B. Russell, John M. Livingston, S. Ramachandran, Jens Redemann and Bryan A. Baum

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50185

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      Key Points

      • New approach to retrieve cirrus properties from sunphotometers
      • Utilization and comparison of several explicit cirrus optical properties models
      • Investigating the effect of aerosol below cloud on cirrus property retrievals
    44. The roles of aerosol direct and indirect effects in past and future climate change (pages 4521–4532)

      Hiram Levy II, Larry W. Horowitz, M. Daniel Schwarzkopf, Yi Ming, Jean-Christophe Golaz, Vaishali Naik and V. Ramaswamy

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50192

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      Key Points

      • Aerosol reductions (RCP4.5) cause 1K warming and +0.1 mm/day of precipitation.
      • Sulfate indirect effects greatly enhance aerosol impacts on surface temperature.
      • Aerosol reductions increase precipitation in Asia by 0.5–1.0 mm/day by 2100.
    45. Microphysical and radiative changes in cirrus clouds by geoengineering the stratosphere (pages 4533–4548)

      A. Cirisan, P. Spichtinger, B. P. Luo, D. K. Weisenstein, H. Wernli, U. Lohmann and T. Peter

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50388

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      Key Points

      • Stratospheric geoengineering has not important side effect on cirrus clouds.
    46. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Assessment of uncertainty in cloud radiative effects and heating rates through retrieval algorithm differences: Analysis using 3 years of ARM data at Darwin, Australia (pages 4549–4571)

      Jennifer M. Comstock, Alain Protat, Sally A. McFarlane, Julien Delanoë and Min Deng

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50404

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      Key Points

      • Cloud radiative effect uncertainty is driven by differences ice size and shape
      • Retrieval algorithm uncertainty leads to 2 K/day difference in radiative heating
    47. Seasonal and diurnal variations of aerosol extinction profile and type distribution from CALIPSO 5-year observations (pages 4572–4596)

      Lei Huang, Jonathan H. Jiang, Jason L. Tackett, Hui Su and Rong Fu

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50407

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      Key Points

      • Seasonal variations of vertical distribution of aerosol properties are evaluated
      • Diurnal variations of vertical distribution of aerosol properties are evaluated
      • Dust, smoke and polluted dust are the most frequently detected aerosol types
    48. Numerical simulations of dust fluxes to the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: Comparison of model results with a Holocene peat record of dust deposition (pages 4597–4609)

      Marion Ferrat, Baerbel Langmann, Xuefeng Cui, Jefferson Gomes and Dominik J. Weiss

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50275

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      Key Points

      • We use a regional climate model to simulate dust fluxes to the Tibetan Plateau
      • Dust fluxes and sources are compared to those recorded in a Holocene peat core
      • The model successfully reproduced average deposition fluxes to the core site
    49. Heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of crystalline sodium chloride dihydrate particles (pages 4610–4622)

      Robert Wagner and Ottmar Möhler

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50325

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      Key Points

      • NaCl dihydrate particles act as heterogeneous ice nuclei in the deposition mode
    50. Vertical structure of aerosols, temperature, and moisture associated with an intense African dust event observed over the eastern Caribbean (pages 4623–4643)

      Eunsil Jung, Bruce Albrecht, Joseph M. Prospero, Haflidi H. Jonsson and Sonia M. Kreidenweis

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50352

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      Key Points

      • Vertical structure and characteristics of SAL
      • Changes in PSD due to the cloud processing
      • Vertical transports and mixing processes of dust
    51. Probabilistic assessment of cloud fraction using Bayesian blending of independent datasets: Feasibility study of a new method (pages 4644–4656)

      Samuel S.P. Shen, Max Velado, Richard C. J. Somerville and Gabriel J. Kooperman

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50408

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      Key Points

      • Bayesian blending of camera and radar data to form a cloud fraction pdf
      • Feasibility study of a method on probabilistic assessment of cloud fractions
      • Beta distribution as a model for cloud fractions
    52. The role of circulation features on black carbon transport into the Arctic in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) (pages 4657–4669)

      Po-Lun Ma, Philip J. Rasch, Hailong Wang, Kai Zhang, Richard C. Easter, Simone Tilmes, Jerome D. Fast, Xiaohong Liu, Jin-Ho Yoon and Jean-Francois Lamarque

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50411

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      Key Points

      • Circulation biases in CAM5 is not the main reason for the low BC in the Arctic.
      • The coarse model resolution produces the weak eddy transport.
      • The AO bias in CAM5 produces incorrect interannual variability of BC transport.
    53. Evolution of line charge density of steadily-developing upward positive leaders in triggered lightning (pages 4670–4678)

      Mingli Chen, Dong Zheng, Yaping Du and Yijun Zhang

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50446

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      Key Points

      • A method for estimating charge density of upward leader is suggested.
      • The method is applied to 2 upward positive leaders in triggered lightning.
      • The leader charge density shows an increase with the height.
    54. Statistical decision analysis for flight decision support: The SPartICus campaign (pages 4679–4688)

      Christopher J. Hanlon, Jason B. Stefik, Arthur A. Small, Johannes Verlinde and George S. Young

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50237

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      Key points

      • Algorithmic decision tools show promise in field campaign resource allocation.
      • The SPartICus campaign measured cirrus clouds using aircraft.
      • An algorithmic tool could have saved resources, yielded more data.
    55. Application of cloud vertical structure from CloudSat to investigate MODIS-derived cloud properties of cirriform, anvil, and deep convective clouds (pages 4689–4699)

      Alisa H. Young, John J. Bates and Judith A. Curry

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50306

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      Key Points

      • Optical and microphysical properties of high clouds are investigated using CVS
      • The data show anvil clouds are predominantly characteristic of Hi/Ci clouds
      • CVS is useful to assess the uncertainty of passive RS cloud taxonomy schemes
    56. Investigating enhanced Aqua MODIS aerosol optical depth retrievals over the mid-to-high latitude Southern Oceans through intercomparison with co-located CALIOP, MAN, and AERONET data sets (pages 4700–4714)

      Travis D. Toth, Jianglong Zhang, James R. Campbell, Jeffrey S. Reid, Yingxi Shi, Randall S. Johnson, Alexander Smirnov, Mark A. Vaughan and David M. Winker

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50311

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      Key Points

      • A band of enhanced AOD over Southern Oceans (ESOA) is observed by some sensors
      • ESOA is not evident from ground-based and CALIOP data
      • CALIOP analysis suggests cloud contamination is not only factor in ESOA
    57. Evaluation of black carbon semi‒direct radiative effect in a climate model (pages 4715–4728)

      Jiangnan Li, Knut von Salzen, Yiran Peng, Hua Zhang and Xin‒Zhong Liang

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50327

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      Key Points

      • BC inclusion in cloud droplets
      • relationship between BC and cloud
      • Re-investigate the BC semi-direct forcing
    58. Investigation of the complex dynamics and structure of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud using multispectral images and numerical simulations (pages 4729–4747)

      C. Spinetti, S. Barsotti, A. Neri, M. F. Buongiorno, F. Doumaz and L. Nannipieri

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50328

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      Key Points

      • A new methodological approach for investigating volcanic ash cloud
      • Integration of satellite observations and numerical simulations
      • Model sensitivity to initial volcanological conditions
    59. CALIOP and AERONET aerosol optical depth comparisons: One size fits none (pages 4748–4766)

      A. H. Omar, D. M. Winker, J. L. Tackett, D. M. Giles, J. Kar, Z. Liu, M. A. Vaughan, K. A. Powell and C. R. Trepte

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50330

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      Key Points

      • Criteria for AOD Comparisons
      • Study provides guidance for CALIPSO data screening
    60. Chemical and hygroscopic properties of aerosol organics at Storm Peak Laboratory (pages 4767–4779)

      A. Gannet Hallar, Douglas H. Lowenthal, Simon L. Clegg, Vera Samburova, Nathan Taylor, Lynn R. Mazzoleni, Barbara K. Zielinska, Thomas B. Kristensen, Galina Chirokova, Ian B. McCubbin, Craig Dodson and Don Collins

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50373

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      Key Points

      • Measured growth factor results compare favorably with estimates from models.
      • WSOC accounted for an average of 89% of OC mass.
      • The organic mass to organic carbon ratio of the WSOC from this study is 2.04.
    61. Lightning distribution with respect to the monsoon trough position during the Indian summer monsoon season (pages 4780–4787)

      Ramesh Kumar Penki and A. K. Kamra

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50382

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      Key Points

      • Lightning a proxy for the monsoon trough
      • lightning Position and monsoon trough coincide
      • Monsoon trough shifts to Himalayas in monsoon break period
    62. Volcanic sulfate deposition to Greenland and Antarctica: A modeling sensitivity study (pages 4788–4800)

      Matthew Toohey, Kirstin Krüger and Claudia Timmreck

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50428

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      Key Points

      • Modeled deposition of volcanic sulfate varies with eruption magnitude and season
      • Antarctic sulfate deposition efficiency decreases for strong eruptions
      • Anomalous post-eruption dynamics impacts transport from stratosphere to surface
    63. Estimating the direct radiative effect of absorbing aerosols overlying marine boundary layer clouds in the southeast Atlantic using MODIS and CALIOP (pages 4801–4815)

      Kerry Meyer, Steven Platnick, Lazaros Oreopoulos and Dongmin Lee

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50449

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      Key Points

      • MODIS liquid cloud retrievals biased by overlying absorbing aerosols.
      • CALIOP above-cloud AOD used to adjust MODIS cloud retrievals.
      • Effects of bias-adjusted cloud retrievals on DARE estimates examined.
    64. On the scale estimation using truncated swath measurements from low Earth orbiting satellites (pages 4816–4833)

      Qi Liu

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50354

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      Key Points

      • A method is proposed to estimate object scale using truncated swath measurements
      • Mean object area fraction (MOAF) is capable of mitigating truncation effects
      • MOAF-equivalent radius (MER) has lower biases than pixel-counting methods
    65. On the potential high acid deposition in northeastern China (pages 4834–4846)

      Junji Cao, Xuexi Tie, Walter F. Dabberdt, Tang Jie, Zhuzi Zhao, Zhisheng An, Zhenxing Shen and Yinchang Feng

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50381

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      Key Points

      • There is an acid rain conundrum in China.
      • satellite observations and MOZART chemical transport model calculations.
      • Two field measurements in China were studied.
    66. Composition and Chemistry

      Soil moisture retrieval from multi-instrument observations: Information content analysis and retrieval methodology (pages 4847–4859)

      J. Kolassa, F. Aires, J. Polcher, C. Prigent, C. Jimenez and J. M. Pereira

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018150

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      Key Points

      • Multi-instrument soil moisture retrieval algorithm has been developed
      • Data fusion was found to perform better than a posteriori combination
      • Algorithm has been evaluated and used to create soil moisture data base
    67. A high-frequency response relaxed eddy accumulation flux measurement system for sampling short-lived biogenic volatile organic compounds (pages 4860–4873)

      Robert R. Arnts, Fred L. Mowry and Gary A. Hampton

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50215

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      Key Points

      • Flux measurement methodology for high reactivity, semi-volatile VOCs
      • REA with integrated gas phase ozone removal
      • Internal standard used for volumetric corrections and accumulator VOC breakthrough
    68. Study of atmospheric CH4 mole fractions at three WMO/GAW stations in China (pages 4874–4886)

      Shuang-Xi Fang, Ling-Xi Zhou, Kenneth A. Masarie, Lin Xu and Chris W. Rella

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50284

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      Key Points

      • measurement of atmospheric CH4 at the WMO/GAW stations in China
      • the variations of atmospheric CH4 are studied
      • the factors infectng CH4 mole fractions are analysed
    69. Impact of aerosol and thin cirrus on retrieving and validating XCO2 from GOSAT shortwave infrared measurements (pages 4887–4905)

      S. Guerlet, A. Butz, D. Schepers, S. Basu, O. P. Hasekamp, A. Kuze, T. Yokota, J.-F. Blavier, N. M. Deutscher, D. W. T. Griffith, F. Hase, E. Kyro, I. Morino, V. Sherlock, R. Sussmann, A. Galli and I. Aben

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50332

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      Key Points

      • Errors due to clouds and aerosols are evaluated in full physics XCO2 retrievals
      • A bias correction is tested to improve regional accuracy of RemoTeC retrievals
      • Two co-location methods are evaluated for validation of satellite retrievals
    70. Assessment of intercalibration methods for satellite microwave humidity sounders (pages 4906–4918)

      Viju O. John, Richard P. Allan, William Bell, Stefan A. Buehler and Ajil Kottayil

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50358

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      Key Points

      • Three methods for inter-calibration are assessed
      • Diurnal cycle aliasing is a main issue
      • Radiance-dependent bias limits usage of SNOs
    71. Mercury speciation in a coal-fired power plant plume: An aircraft-based study of emissions from the 3640 MW Nanticoke Generating Station, Ontario, Canada (pages 4919–4935)

      Daniel A. Deeds, Catharine M. Banic, Julia Lu and Sreerama Daggupaty

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50349

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      Key Points

      • Plume mercury speciation constant after emission from a coal-fired power plant
      • Discrepancies in gaseous oxidized mercury due to bias in measurement techniques
      • Most mercury emitted from the Nanticoke plant is transported out of study region
    72. Application of an adjoint neighborhood-scale chemistry transport model to the attribution of primary formaldehyde at Lynchburg Ferry during TexAQS II (pages 4936–4946)

      Eduardo P. Olaguer

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50406

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      Key Points

      • Inverse modeling of HCHO and olefins was performed
      • Inferred emissions compare well with remote sensing measurements
      • Primary HCHO is significant
    73. Tropical Atlantic dust and smoke aerosol variations related to the Madden-Julian Oscillation in MODIS and MISR observations (pages 4947–4963)

      Yanjuan Guo, Baijun Tian, Ralph A. Kahn, Olga Kalashnikova, Sun Wong and Duane E. Waliser

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50409

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      Key Points

      • The tropical Atlantic dust and smoke aerosols components are derived
      • Complementary results from two satellite datasets: MODIS and MISR, are examined
      • The intraseasonal varibilities of dust and smoke aerosols are investigated
    74. Is chlorophyll-a the best surrogate for organic matter enrichment in submicron primary marine aerosol? (pages 4964–4973)

      Matteo Rinaldi, Sandro Fuzzi, Stefano Decesari, Salvatore Marullo, Rosalia Santoleri, Antonello Provenzale, Jost von Hardenberg, Darius Ceburnis, Aditya Vaishya, Colin D. O'Dowd and Maria Cristina Facchini

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50417

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      Key Points

      • Chlorophyll is the best proxy for predicting marine primary organic aerosol
      • A new relationship describing the organic enrichment of sea spray is presented
    75. Quantifying sources of methane using light alkanes in the Los Angeles basin, California (pages 4974–4990)

      J. Peischl, T. B. Ryerson, J. Brioude, K. C. Aikin, A. E. Andrews, E. Atlas, D. Blake, B. C. Daube, J. A. de Gouw, E. Dlugokencky, G. J. Frost, D. R. Gentner, J. B. Gilman, A. H. Goldstein, R. A. Harley, J. S. Holloway, J. Kofler, W. C. Kuster, P. M. Lang, P. C. Novelli, G. W. Santoni, M. Trainer, S. C. Wofsy and D. D. Parrish

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50413

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      Key Points

      • Top-down estimates of CH4 emissions in L.A. are greater than inventory estimates
      • Estimates of CH4 emissions from landfills in L.A. agree with CARB inventory
      • Pipeline natural gas and/or seeps, and landfills are main sources of CH4 in L.A.
    76. Simulation of polar stratospheric clouds in the specified dynamics version of the whole atmosphere community climate model (pages 4991–5002)

      T. Wegner, D. E. Kinnison, R. R. Garcia and S. Solomon

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50415

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      Key Points

      • Removal of gas-phase HNO3 follows the STS equilibrium function
      • Ice PSCs form at temperatures around the frost point
      • Denitrification and dehydration are in good agreement with observations
    77. The impact of shipping, agricultural, and urban emissions on single particle chemistry observed aboard the R/V Atlantis during CalNex (pages 5003–5017)

      Cassandra J. Gaston, Patricia K. Quinn, Timothy S. Bates, Jessica B. Gilman, Daniel M. Bon, William C. Kuster and Kimberly A. Prather

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50427

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      Key Points

      • Southern California was dominated by soot containing particles
      • Northern California was dominated by organic carbon particles
      • Particle mixing-state was heavily influenced by meteorological conditions
    78. Photochemical aging of volatile organic compounds in the Los Angeles basin: Weekday-weekend effect (pages 5018–5028)

      Carsten Warneke, Joost A. de Gouw, Peter M. Edwards, John S. Holloway, Jessica B. Gilman, William C. Kuster, Martin Graus, Elliot Atlas, Don Blake, Drew R. Gentner, Allen H. Goldstein, Robert A. Harley, Sergio Alvarez, Bernhard Rappenglueck, Michael Trainer and David D. Parrish

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50423

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      Key Points

      • Spatial and temporal photochemical processing in Los Angeles
      • VOC weekday-weekend effect
      • Faster photochemistry in weekends
    79. Long-term ozone changes and associated climate impacts in CMIP5 simulations (pages 5029–5060)

      V. Eyring, J. M. Arblaster, I. Cionni, J. Sedláček, J. Perlwitz, P. J. Young, S. Bekki, D. Bergmann, P. Cameron-Smith, W. J. Collins, G. Faluvegi, K.-D. Gottschaldt, L. W. Horowitz, D. E. Kinnison, J.-F. Lamarque, D. R. Marsh, D. Saint-Martin, D. T. Shindell, K. Sudo, S. Szopa and S. Watanabe

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50316

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      Key Points

      • CMIP5 models all consider past ozone depletion and future ozone recovery
      • Multimodel ozone agrees well with observations but individual models deviate
      • Future climate is sensitive to rates of both ozone recovery and GHG increases
  3. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Regular Articles
    4. Correction
    1. Composition and Chemistry

      Correction to “Interannual variability of carbon monoxide emission estimates over South America from 2006 to 2010” (pages 5061–5064)

      M. C. Krol, P. B. Hooghiemstra, T. T. van Leeuwen, G. R. van der Werf, P. C. Novelli, M. N. Deeter, I. Aben and T. Röckmann

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50389

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