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Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

Cover image for Vol. 118 Issue 2

16/28 January 2013

Volume 118, Issue 2

Pages 243–1138

  1. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    3. Research Articles
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Regular Articles
    7. Research Articles
    8. Regular Articles
    1. Climate and Dynamics

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      Modeling insights into deuterium excess as an indicator of water vapor source conditions (pages 243–262)

      Sophie C. Lewis, Allegra N. LeGrande, Maxwell Kelley and Gavin A. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017804

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      Key Points

      • Deuterium excess (d) generally a faithful tracer of oceanic source conditions
      • Proxy is sensitive to boundary condition changes, such as during LGM
      • Quantitative d interpretations not always valid for very different conditions
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      Entropy-based method for extreme rainfall analysis in Texas (pages 263–273)

      Z. Hao and V. P. Singh

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JD017394

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      Key Points

      • Analyzed annual rainfall maxima distributions with duration,climate and distance
      • Derived an entropy-based distribution for extreme rainfall analysis
      • Assessed the performance in modeling extreme rainfall
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      Comprehensive evaluation of polar weather research and forecasting model performance in the Antarctic (pages 274–292)

      David H. Bromwich, Francis O. Otieno, Keith M. Hines, Kevin W. Manning and Elad Shilo

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018139

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      Key Points

      • Benchmark the forecast performance of Polar WRF in Antarctica
      • Explain the forecast performance of Polar WRF in Antarctica
      • Test Polar WRF's sensitivity to three model forcing factors
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      Impact of land surface conditions on 2004 North American monsoon in GCM experiments (pages 293–305)

      X. Feng, M. Bosilovich, P. Houser and J.-D. Chern

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018805

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      Key Points

      • Identify land surface impact on the North American monsoon (NAM)
      • A positive soil moisture-precipitation feedback due to local recycling mechanism
      • A negative soil moisture-precipitation feedback due to large-scale mechanism
  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    3. Research Articles
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      A model analysis of the interactions between East Asian anthropogenic aerosols and North Pacific atmospheric transients in boreal winter (pages 306–316)

      Renjun Zhou and Yi Deng

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018649

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      Key Points

      • East Asian anthropogenic aerosols change North Pacific transient eddy activity
      • Change of low-frequency eddy dictates the overall eddy response to aerosols
      • Change of eddy meridional heat flux drives the simulated eddy response
  3. Regular Articles

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    2. Regular Articles
    3. Research Articles
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Regular Articles
    7. Research Articles
    8. Regular Articles
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      Noctilucent cloud variability and mean parameters from 15 years of lidar observations at a mid-latitude site (54°N, 12°E) (pages 317–328)

      M. Gerding, J. Höffner, P. Hoffmann, M. Kopp and F.-J. Lübken

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018319

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      Key Points

      • 15 years of mid-latitude NLC data: less and weaker NLC than at polar latitudes
      • Temperatures influence mean NLC occurrence while not sufficient for individual
      • Mean NLC height only 700 m below polar NLC despite strong temperature difference
  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    3. Research Articles
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Regular Articles
    7. Research Articles
    8. Regular Articles
    1. Climate and Dynamics

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      Evaluation of the atmospheric water vapor content in a regional climate model using ground-based GPS measurements (pages 329–339)

      T. Ning, G. Elgered, U. Willén and J. M. Johansson

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018053

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      Key Points

      • Evaluate a regional climate model using ground-based GPS measurements
      • The model is too dry, in terms of atmospheric water vapor, in summer
      • Care has to be made when comparing the GPS data to the model gridded output
  5. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    3. Research Articles
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Regular Articles
    7. Research Articles
    8. Regular Articles
    1. Climate and Dynamics

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      Summer rainfall variability over the Southeastern United States and its intensification in the 21st century as assessed by CMIP5 models (pages 340–354)

      Laifang Li, Wenhong Li and Yi Deng

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50136

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      Key Points

      • SE US summer rainfall variability is analyzed by using CMIP5 models
      • CMIP5 models suggest the increase of summer rainfall variability in the future
      • Enhanced rainfall extremes may be caused by pattern shift of NASH western ridge
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      Evaluating the impact of orbital sampling on satellite–climate model comparisons (pages 355–369)

      Bin Guan, Duane E. Waliser, Jui-Lin F. Li and Arlindo da Silva

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018590

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      Key Points

      • Orbital sampling effect is evaluated for six variables and six instruments
      • Raw and sampled data are compared in terms of bias and pattern similarity
      • Significance of the comparison is assessed against observational uncertainty
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      Global transients in ultraviolet and red-infrared ranges from data of Universitetsky-Tatiana-2 satellite (pages 370–379)

      G. K. Garipov, B. A. Khrenov, P. A. Klimov, V. V. Klimenko, E. A. Mareev, O. Martines, E. Mendoza, V. S. Morozenko, M. I. Panasyuk, I. H. Park, E. Ponce, L. Rivera, H. Salazar, V. I. Tulupov, N. N. Vedenkin and I. V. Yashin

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017501

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      Key points

      • Series of every minute transient events were measured
      • Transients in cloudless regions away of thunderstorms were measured
      • The altitudes of transient events is more than 50 km
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      Spatial-temporal variations of evapotranspiration and runoff/precipitation ratios responding to the changing climate in the Pacific Northwest during 1921-2006 (pages 380–394)

      Mingliang Liu, Jennifer C. Adam and Alan F. Hamlet

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018400

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      Key Points

      • Modeled ET and R are evaluated with site and regional observations
      • Water- and energy-limited zones has different responses to changing climate
      • There are significant seasonal and spatial variations in ET and R/P
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      Uncertainty quantification and parameter tuning in the CAM5 Zhang-McFarlane convection scheme and impact of improved convection on the global circulation and climate (pages 395–415)

      Ben Yang, Yun Qian, Guang Lin, L. Ruby Leung, Philip J. Rasch, Guang J. Zhang, Sally A. McFarlane, Chun Zhao, Yaocun Zhang, Hailong Wang, Minghuai Wang and Xiaohong Liu

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018213

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      Key Points

      • Convective and stratiform rain partitioning in CAM is different with observation
      • Convective precipitation is most sensitive to three key parameters in ZM scheme
      • Improved deep convection in model has positive impact on circulation and climate
  6. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
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    3. Research Articles
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    6. Regular Articles
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    8. Regular Articles
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      A global view of stratospheric gravity wave hotspots located with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder observations (pages 416–434)

      L. Hoffmann, X. Xue and M. J. Alexander

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018658

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      Key Points

      • AIRS observations provide a first global view of gravity wave peak events
      • Hotspots are located and classified with convective or orographic sources
      • Many hotspots are previously unidentified and will motivate new case studies
  7. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    3. Research Articles
    4. Regular Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Regular Articles
    7. Research Articles
    8. Regular Articles
    1. Climate and Dynamics

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      A combined laboratory and modeling study of the infrared extinction and visible light scattering properties of mineral dust aerosol (pages 435–452)

      Jennifer M. Alexander, Olga Laskina, Brian Meland, Mark A. Young, Vicki H. Grassian and Paul D. Kleiber

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018751

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      Key Points

      • IR extinction and visible light scattering of mineral dust are studied
      • Laboratory measurements are compared with T-Matrix modeling results
      • Good agreement between experiment and theory is found
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      Regional variation of morphology of organized convection in the tropics and subtropics (pages 453–466)

      Chuntao Liu and Edward Zipser

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018409

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      Key Points

      • Organized convection are larger and more circular shapes over land
      • There are more line shaped convection over ocean
      • Convective lines are aligned with fronts, dry lines, warm ocean currents etc.
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      Increased summer rainfall in northwest Australia linked to southern Indian Ocean climate variability (pages 467–480)

      Juan Feng, Jianping Li and Hanlie Xu

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018323

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      Key Points

      • We explored the influences from extra-tropics on the NWA summer rainfall
      • The increased NWA rainfall has an imprint in the strength of the Mascarene high
      • The preceding SAM contributes to the enhance of the Mascarene high via SST
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      Quantifying the effect of urbanization on U.S. Historical Climatology Network temperature records (pages 481–494)

      Zeke Hausfather, Matthew J. Menne, Claude N. Williams, Troy Masters, Ronald Broberg and David Jones

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018509

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      Key Points

      • There are significant urbanity-correlated biases in USHCN
      • Existing automated homogeneity techniques correct for the majority of bias
      • Urbanity-correlated biases may be poorly corrected when station density is low
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      Surface-based inversions above central Greenland (pages 495–506)

      N. B. Miller, D. D. Turner, R. Bennartz, M. D. Shupe, M. S. Kulie, M. P. Cadeddu and Von P. Walden

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018867

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      Key points

      • Surface-based inversions are a dominant feature above the Greenland ice sheet
      • Solar elevation angle affects the diurnal and annual cycle
      • Additional factors affect surface-based inversions
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      Relative contributions of secondary organic aerosol formation from toluene, xylenes, isoprene, and monoterpenes in Hong Kong and Guangzhou in the Pearl River Delta, China: an emission-based box modeling study (pages 507–519)

      Siyuan Wang, Dongwei Wu, Xin-Ming Wang, Jimmy Chi-Hung Fung and Jian Zhen Yu

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017985

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      Key Points

      • An emission-based box model is used to explain precursor contributions to SOA
      • Aromatics are more significant SOA precursors in Guangzhou than in Hong Kong
      • Better data on monoterpenes and their SOA tracers are needed for the Pearl River Delta, China
    7. Climate and Dynamics

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      A novel approach to statistical downscaling considering nonstationarities: application to daily precipitation in the Mediterranean area (pages 520–533)

      E. Hertig and J. Jacobeit

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50112

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      Key Points

      • Statistical downscaling of future precipitation changes using RCP4.5 scenario
      • Introduction of a novel validation approach considering nonstationarities
      • Application of a combined circulation-based and transfer function– based approach
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      Effect of data coverage on the estimation of mean and variability of precipitation at global and regional scales (pages 534–546)

      Hui Wan, Xuebin Zhang, Francis W. Zwiers and Hideo Shiogama

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50118

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      Key Points

      • In-situ observation not sufficient for global land precipitation estimation
      • observation may be sufficient for regional estimations in some regions
      • observation sufficient for the trend estimation
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      Assessment of surface winds over the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean sectors of the Southern Ocean in CMIP5 models: historical bias, forcing response, and state dependence (pages 547–562)

      Thomas J. Bracegirdle, Emily Shuckburgh, Jean-Baptiste Sallee, Zhaomin Wang, Andrew J. S. Meijers, Nicolas Bruneau, Tony Phillips and Laura J. Wilcox

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50153

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      Key points

      • Equatorward bias in surface jet position, largest over the Pacific sector
      • 28% of jet position bias is from coupling of ocean/ice models to the atmosphere
      • State dependence strong over the Pacific sector, weak over the Atlantic sector
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      Stratospheric ozone and the morphology of the northern hemisphere planetary waveguide (pages 563–576)

      John R. Albers, John P. McCormack and Terrence R. Nathan

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017937

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      Key Points

      • Ozone changes the meridional and vertical extent of the planetary waveguide
      • Ozone increases the wave activity flux from the lower into the upper
      • Ozone causes a warmer and weaker stratospheric polar vortex
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      Enhancing model-based land surface temperature estimates using multiplatform microwave observations (pages 577–591)

      Thomas R. H. Holmes, Wade T. Crow, M. Tugrul Yilmaz, Thomas J. Jackson and Jeffrey B. Basara

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50113

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      Key Points

      • Model temperature output is enhanced with satellite observations
      • Preprocessing reduces structural diurnal differences in temperature
      • Satellite observations particularly improve diurnal temperature amplitude
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      Radiative heating of the ISCCP upper level cloud regimes and its impact on the large-scale tropical circulation (pages 592–604)

      Wei Li, Courtney Schumacher and Sally A. McFarlane

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50114

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      Key points

      • Matched ISCCP cloud regimes with DOE-ARM radiative properties
      • Provided the overall radiative heating for tropics-wide upper level clouds
      • Estimated the large-scale dynamical impact of the upper level clouds
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      Agreement in late twentieth century Southern Hemisphere stratospheric temperature trends in observations and CCMVal-2, CMIP3, and CMIP5 models (pages 605–613)

      Paul J. Young, Amy H. Butler, Natalia Calvo, Leopold Haimberger, Paul J. Kushner, Daniel R. Marsh, William J. Randel and Karen H. Rosenlof

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50126

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      Key Points

      • Models and observations agree within their uncertainties
      • Observed trends are 50% stronger than previously calculated value
      • Study emphasizes need to use a wide range of observations for model evaluation
    14. Aerosol and Clouds

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      13C- and 14C-based study of sources and atmospheric processing of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in South Asian aerosols (pages 614–626)

      Elena N. Kirillova, August Andersson, Rebecca J. Sheesley, Martin Kruså, P. S. Praveen, Krishnakant Budhavant, P. D. Safai, P. S. P. Rao and Örjan Gustafsson

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50130

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      Key Points

      • Fossil fuels contributed 17-23% to S Asian aerosol water-soluble organic carbon
      • Longer transported water-soluble component was enriched in del13C by 3-4 per mil
      • Isotope signature of S Asian water-soluble organic carbon reflects aerosol aging
    15. Climate and Dynamics

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      Re-examination of the I-5 dust storm (pages 627–642)

      Michael L. Kaplan, Ramesh K. Vellore, John M. Lewis, S. Jeffrey Underwood, Patricia M. Pauley, Jonathan E. Martin and R. Krishnan

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50131

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      Key Points

      • Mesoscale direct circulation and associated mass/temperature adjustments are important dynamic controls for dust storms
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      Influence of climate variability on seasonal extremes over Australia (pages 643–654)

      Seung-Ki Min, Wenju Cai and Penny Whetton

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50164

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      Key Points

      • Inter-annual variations of Australian extremes are examined using GEV analysis
      • Extreme responses overall resemble mean responses to climate variability
      • Teleconnection mechanisms for seasonal mean may be at work for extremes
    17. Aerosol and Clouds

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      Global all-sky shortwave direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols from combined satellite observations and GOCART simulations (pages 655–669)

      Wenying Su, Norman G. Loeb, Gregory L. Schuster, Mian Chin and Fred G. Rose

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018294

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      Key Points

      • Calculate all-sky aerosol DRF using 3-hourly clouds and two daily aerosol data
      • All-sky TOA aerosol DRFs from these two aerosol datasets differ significantly
      • Clouds amplify the sensitivity of DRF to aerosol single scattering albedo
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      Climate-induced changes in sea salt aerosol number emissions: 1870 to 2100 (pages 670–682)

      H. Struthers, A. M. L. Ekman, P. Glantz, T. Iversen, A. Kirkevåg, Ø. Seland, E. M. Mårtensson, K. Noone and E. D. Nilsson

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50129

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      Key Points

      • Global sea salt aerosol emissions increase by 3.6% from 1870 to 2100
      • The size distribution of the emissions is projected to change significantly
      • Changes in emission characteristics may be important for future climate
    19. Aerosol and Clouds

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      A multimodel assessment of the influence of regional anthropogenic emission reductions on aerosol direct radiative forcing and the role of intercontinental transport (pages 700–720)

      Hongbin Yu, Mian Chin, J. Jason West, Cynthia S. Atherton, Nicolas Bellouin, Dan Bergmann, Isabelle Bey, Huisheng Bian, Thomas Diehl, Gerd Forberth, Peter Hess, Michael Schulz, Drew Shindell, Toshihiko Takemura and Qian Tan

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018148

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      Key Points

      • Multi-model assessment of AOD change due to man-made emission reductions
      • Intercontinental transport contribution ranges from 11 to 31%
      • 36% of BC AOD in NA and 30% of sulfate AOD in SA come from outside
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      BATTAGLIA AND DELANOË: CLOUDSAT-CALIPSO SNOW OBSERVATIONS (pages 721–731)

      A. Battaglia and J. Delanoë

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018092

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      Key Points

      • CALIOP and the CloudSat can be used in synergy to characterize snow
      • 49% of the snowy profiles present mixed-phase layers
      • In light snow CALIOP is capable of penetrating more than half of the snow depth
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      Evaluation of clouds in ACCESS using the satellite simulator package COSP: Global, seasonal, and regional cloud properties (pages 732–748)

      Charmaine N. Franklin, Zhian Sun, Daohua Bi, Martin Dix, Hailin Yan and Alejandro Bodas-Salcedo

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018469

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      Key Points

      • ACCESS clouds show good agreement with observations
      • Deep tropical clouds have too little ice and are optically too thin
      • ACCESS has a systematic bias to drizzle too often
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      Seasonal variation of surface and vertical profile of aerosol properties over a tropical urban station Hyderabad, India (pages 749–768)

      P. R. Sinha, R. K. Manchanda, D. G. Kaskaoutis, Y. B. Kumar and S. Sreenivasan

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018039

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      Key Points

      • Seasonality in aerosol characteristics and the influence of MLH
      • Black carbon aerosols play an important role in the ABL aerosol loading
      • Multiple thin aerosol layers on certain days in monsoon season over Hyderabad
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      Retrievals of vertical profiles of stratus cloud properties from combined oxygen A-band and radar observations (pages 769–778)

      Siwei Li and Qilong Min

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018282

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      Key Points

      • A synergetic algorithm has been developed for retrieving cloud properties
      • Oxygen A-band spectral measurements and radar reflectivity are combined
      • Vertical structure of Re, LWC and optical depth can be retrieved
    25. You have free access to this content
      Can black carbon in snow be detected by remote sensing? (pages 779–786)

      Stephen G. Warren

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018476

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      Key Points

      • Estimation of BC in snow by remote sensing is unlikely to be successful
      • Nadir radiance is lowered by thin clouds over snow
      • Thin snow has the same spectral signature as black carbon in snow
    26. You have free access to this content
      Statistical patterns in the location of natural lightning (pages 787–796)

      F. G. Zoghzoghy, M. B. Cohen, R. K. Said and U. S. Inan

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50107

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      Key Points

      • Statistical tool used to measure cloud electrification on a global scale
      • A discharge neutralizes an appreciable fraction of the cloud charge within 10 km
      • Recovery takes ~30 sec and varies with multiplicity, polarity, type and intensity
    27. You have free access to this content
      Modeling the transport and radiative forcing of Taklimakan dust over the Tibetan Plateau: A case study in the summer of 2006 (pages 797–812)

      Siyu Chen, Jianping Huang, Chun Zhao, Yun Qian, L. Ruby Leung and Ben Yang

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50122

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      Key Points

      • Evaluate WRF-Chem performance of simulating Taklimakan dust
      • Understand transport of Taklimakan dust over the Tibetan Plateau
      • Estimate direct radiative forcing of Taklimakan dust over the Tibetan Plateau
    28. You have free access to this content
      Field Measured Spectral Albedo–Four Years of Data from the Western U.S. Prairie (pages 813–825)

      Joseph J. Michalsky and Gary B. Hodges

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50149

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      Key Points

      • Subtle instrument issues must be addressed in measurements used for albedo
      • NDVI, as defined for the MFRSR, is a sensitive indicator of vegetation condition
      • Albedos measured over fresh snow are consistent with a Lambertian reflector
    29. You have free access to this content
      A large-eddy simulation of the phase transition of ammonium nitrate in a convective boundary layer (pages 826–836)

      J. M. J. Aan de Brugh, H. G. Ouwersloot, J. Vilà-Guerau de Arellano and M. C. Krol

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50161

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      Key Points

      • Gas-aerosol partitioning induces variabilities and fluxes of aerosol nitrate
      • Dimensionless features of nitrate partitioning do not depend on temperature
      • Analysis of nitrate observations may provide information on equilibration speed
    30. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Retrieving Asian dust AOT and height from hyperspectral sounder measurements: An artificial neural network approach (pages 837–845)

      Hyo-Jin Han and B. J. Sohn

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50170

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      Key Points

      • Retrieval of pixel-level aerosol optical thickness and dust height
      • Retrieved AOT and effective dust height comparable to MODIS and CALIPSO
      • Availability of AOT and effective dust height at both day and night
    31. You have free access to this content
      Validation of a radiosonde-based cloud layer detection method against a ground-based remote sensing method at multiple ARM sites (pages 846–858)

      Jinqiang Zhang, Zhanqing Li, Hongbin Chen and Maureen Cribb

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018515

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      Key Points

      [2] 

      • Radiosonde data can be used to portray cloud vertical structure
      • The radiosonde-based cloud layer retrieval method is validated
      • Radiosonde approach matches with remote sensing approach
    32. Composition and Chemistry

      You have free access to this content
      Fine-particle emissions from solid biofuel combustion studied with single-particle mass spectrometry: Identification of markers for organics, soot, and ash components (pages 859–870)

      Joakim Pagels, Dabrina D. Dutcher, Mark R. Stolzenburg, Peter H. McMurry, Markus E. Gälli and Deborah S. Gross

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018389

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      Key Points

      • Single particle signatures unique for wood and corn combustion identified
      • PM Chemistry varies with combustion conditions for a given fuel
      • Mixing status of fresh biomass combustion emissions investigated
    33. You have free access to this content
      The effect of the dynamic surface bareness on dust source function, emission, and distribution (pages 871–886)

      Dongchul Kim, Mian Chin, Huisheng Bian, Qian Tan, Molly E. Brown, Tai Zheng, Renjie You, Tomas Diehl, Paul Ginoux and Tom Kucsera

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017907

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      Key Points

      • Development of global dynamic dust source function using AVHRR-NDVI observation
      • Investigating its impact with GOCART model
      • Dynamic source function shows significant improvements in some deserts
    34. You have free access to this content
      Iodine chemistry in the eastern Pacific marine boundary layer (pages 887–904)

      Juan C. Gómez Martín, Anoop S. Mahajan, Timothy D. Hay, Cristina Prados-Román, Carlos Ordóñez, Samantha M. MacDonald, John M.C. Plane, Mar Sorribas, Manuel Gil, J. Francisco Paredes Mora, Mario V. Agama Reyes, David E. Oram, Emma Leedham and Alfonso Saiz-Lopez

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50132

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      Key Points

      • Yearlong observations of gas-phase iodine species in the tropical Pacific MBL
      • Reactive iodine variability correlated to ocean physical variables
      • Low IO has small impact on O3 and nucleation and questions satellite observation
    35. You have free access to this content
      Relationship between mesospheric Na and Fe layers from simultaneous and common-volume lidar observations at Arecibo (pages 905–916)

      Xianchang Yue, Qihou Zhou, Shikha Raizada, Craig Tepley and Jonathan Friedman

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50148

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      Key Points

      • Mesosphereic Fe and Na are closely correlated, but not always positively
      • Chemical and dynamical effects are discussed
      • Observed correlations are a result of wave dynamics
    36. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Improving the temporal and spatial distribution of CO2 emissions from global fossil fuel emission data sets (pages 917–933)

      Ray Nassar, Louis Napier-Linton, Kevin R. Gurney, Robert J. Andres, Tomohiro Oda, Felix R. Vogel and Feng Deng

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018196

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      Key Points

      • Anthropogenic CO2 emissions exhibit weekly and diurnal variability
      • Temporal Improvements for Modeling Emissions by Scaling (TIMES) were developed
      • Scale factors also improve the spatial distribution of CO2 emissions over Canada
    37. You have free access to this content
      Validation of long-term measurements of water vapor from the midstratosphere to the mesosphere at two Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change sites (pages 934–942)

      Gerald E. Nedoluha, R. Michael Gomez, Helen Neal, Alyn Lambert, Dale Hurst, Chris Boone and Gabriele Stiller

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018900

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      Key Points

      • WVMS instruments now provide water vapor measurements down to 26km
      • This upgrade has not disturbed the long-term mesospheric time series
      • NH mid-latitude stratospheric H2O increased between 2010 and 2011
    38. You have free access to this content
      16-year simulation of Arctic black carbon: Transport, source contribution, and sensitivity analysis on deposition (pages 943–964)

      S. Sharma, M. Ishizawa, D. Chan, D. Lavoué, E. Andrews, K. Eleftheriadis and S. Maksyutov

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017774

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      Key Points

      • Black carbon trends in the Arctic surface have declined by 40% since 1990
      • FSU influence on Arctic BC declined while EA increased aloft over 16 years
      • Biomass burning contributes one third to the Arctic atmospheric BC burden
    39. You have free access to this content
      The ozone response to ENSO in Aura satellite measurements and a chemistry-climate simulation (pages 965–976)

      Luke D. Oman, Anne R. Douglass, Jerry R. Ziemke, Jose M. Rodriguez, Darryn W. Waugh and J. Eric Nielsen

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018546

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      Key Points

      1. We derive the ozone response to ENSO from Aura satellite
      2. Good continuity in MLS/TES derived sensitivity
      3. GEOSCCM can largely reproduce this response
    40. You have free access to this content
      Characterization of methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at temperate freshwater wetlands (pages 977–991)

      Catherine J. Hardacre and Mathew R. Heal

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018424

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      Key Points

      • Methyl halide fluxes varied seasonally and with type of temperate wetland
      • Calluna vulgaris and Phragmites australis were large emitters of methyl halide
      • Data suggest global peat and wetland net flux may currently be underestimated
    41. You have free access to this content
      Identifying tropospheric baseline air masses at Mauna Loa Observatory between 2004 and 2010 using Radon-222 and back trajectories (pages 992–1004)

      Scott D. Chambers, Wlodek Zahorowski, Alastair G. Williams, Jagoda Crawford and Alan D. Griffiths

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018212

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      Key Points

      • Hourly MLO baseline events identified between 2004 and 2010 using radon
      • Contributions to tropospheric air masses under baseline conditions investigated
      • Seasonal/diurnal MLO radon concentrations characterised with improved detector
    42. You have free access to this content
      Constraining ozone-precursor responsiveness using ambient measurements (pages 1005–1019)

      Antara Digar, Daniel S. Cohan, Xue Xiao, Kristen M. Foley, Bonyoung Koo and Greg Yarwood

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018100

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      Key Points

      • Ozone-precursor response is characterized for Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas
      • Efficient methods are applied to compute probabilistic sensitivities
      • Three metrics are introduced to constrain results based on observations
    43. You have free access to this content
      Detection of radioactive 35S at Fukushima and other Japanese sites (pages 1020–1027)

      Antra Priyadarshi, Jason Hill-Falkenthal, Mark H. Thiemens, Naohiro Yoshida, Sakae Toyoda, Keita Yamada, Arata Mukotaka, Ayako Fujii, Mitsuo Uematsu, Shiro Hatakeyama, Izumi Noguchi, Yukihiro Nojiri and Hiroshi Tanimoto

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018485

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      Key Points

      • First measurement of 35SO4 at Fukushima
      • 35S at Fukushima and other site is significantly higher than the background
      • 35S used to calculate the aerosol rain scavenging coefficient
    44. Climate and Dynamics

      You have free access to this content
      Impacts of climate change, ozone recovery, and increasing methane on surface ozone and the tropospheric oxidizing capacity (pages 1028–1041)

      Olaf Morgenstern, Guang Zeng, N. Luke Abraham, Paul J. Telford, Peter Braesicke, John A. Pyle, Steven C. Hardiman, Fiona M. O'Connor and Colin E. Johnson

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018382

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      Key Points

      • Climate change, ozone recovery and methane increases affect oxidizing capacity
      • Methane increases may dominate the change
      • The three factors add up roughly linearly in a model simulation
      Corrected by:

      Correction: Correction to “Impacts of climate change, ozone recovery, and increasing methane on surface ozone and the tropospheric oxidizing capacity”

      Vol. 119, Issue 8, 5028–5036, Article first published online: 17 APR 2014

    45. Composition and Chemistry

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      Probing molecular associations of field-collected and laboratory-generated SOA with nano-DESI high-resolution mass spectrometry (pages 1042–1051)

      Rachel E. O'Brien, Tran B. Nguyen, Alexander Laskin, Julia Laskin, Patrick L. Hayes, Shang Liu, Jose L. Jimenez, Lynn M. Russell, Sergey A. Nizkorodov and Allen H. Goldstein

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50119

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      Key Points

      • The composition of SOA from CalNex sites and from chamber studies are compared.
    46. You have free access to this content
      The relation between atmospheric humidity and temperature trends for stratospheric water (pages 1052–1074)

      S. Fueglistaler, Y.S. Liu, T.J. Flannaghan, P.H. Haynes, D.P. Dee, W.J. Read, E.E. Remsberg, L.W. Thomason, D.F. Hurst, J.R. Lanzante and P.F. Bernath

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50157

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      Key Points

      • Comprehensive assessment of modeled and observed stratospheric water trends
      • Regular oscillations, quiescent periods, and large oscillations alternate
      • Periods of model-observation drifts identified; possible artifacts in T/H2O data
    47. You have free access to this content
      Application of satellite observations for identifying regions of dominant sources of nitrogen oxides over the Indian Subcontinent (pages 1075–1089)

      Sachin D. Ghude, Santosh H. Kulkarni, Chinmay Jena, Gabriele G. Pfister, G. Beig, S. Fadnavis and R. J. van der A

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017811

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      Key Points

      • spatio-temporal variability of NOx sources in India using OMI observations
      • Estimated NOx emission from biomass and specific point sources using OMI data
      • Increasing trend in Anthropognic NOx emission in Inida
    48. You have free access to this content
      Variability of extratropical ozone stratosphere–troposphere exchange using microwave limb sounder observations (pages 1090–1099)

      Mark A. Olsen, Anne R. Douglass and Trevor B. Kaplan

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JD018465

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      Key Points

      • Ozone STE is estimated directly using MLS data and MERRA observations
      • 275 and 214 Tg/yr mean flux in the NH and SH with more variability in the NH
      • Number of years needed to detect a 2-3%/decade ozone STE trend is 35-39 years
    49. You have free access to this content
      Carbon flux estimation for Siberia by inverse modeling constrained by aircraft and tower CO2 measurements (pages 1100–1122)

      T. Saeki, S. Maksyutov, M. Sasakawa, T. Machida, M. Arshinov, P. Tans, T. J. Conway, M. Saito, V. Valsala, T. Oda, R. J. Andres and D. Belikov

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50127

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      Key points

      • CO2 inversion is performed using Siberian data and background data
      • The inclusion of Siberian data in the inversion weakens a boreal Eurasian sink
      • Siberian data reduce flux uncertainties over Siberia and northeastern Europe
    50. You have free access to this content
      Deuterium excess variations of rainfall events in a coastal area of South Australia and its relationship with synoptic weather systems and atmospheric moisture sources (pages 1123–1138)

      Huade Guan, Xinping Zhang, Grzegorz Skrzypek, Zhian Sun and Xiang Xu

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrd.50137

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      Key Points

      • d-excess is related to synoptic weather systems and associated moisture direction
      • Subcloud evaporation contributes to d-excess seasonal variability
      • Low d-excess and δ18O from January to February in Adelaide is interpreted for the first time

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