Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets

Cover image for Vol. 118 Issue 5

May 2013

Volume 118, Issue 5

Pages 877–1154

  1. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    3. Correction
    1. A mechanism for bringing ice and brines to the near surface of Mars (pages 877–890)

      Bryan J. Travis, William C. Feldman and Sylvestre Maurice

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20074

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      Key Points

      • Subsurface brine convection can deposit ice and salt at the surface of Mars.
      • Brine convection occurs over a range of parameter values.
      • Variations in near-surface ice deposits can be related to patterned ground.
    2. The distribution and origin of smooth plains on Mercury (pages 891–907)

      Brett W. Denevi, Carolyn M. Ernst, Heather M. Meyer, Mark S. Robinson, Scott L. Murchie, Jennifer L. Whitten, James W. Head, Thomas R. Watters, Sean C. Solomon, Lillian R. Ostrach, Clark R. Chapman, Paul K. Byrne, Christian Klimczak and Patrick N. Peplowski

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20075

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      Key Points

      • ~27% of Mercury is covered by smooth plains and >65% are volcanic in origin
      • The circum-Caloris plains may be both Caloris ejecta and volcanic deposits
      • The asymmetry of smooth plains may be due to age rather than formational process
    3. Convection-driven compaction as a possible origin of Enceladus's long wavelength topography (pages 908–915)

      J. Besserer, F. Nimmo, J. H. Roberts and R. T. Pappalardo

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20079

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      Key Points

      • pore compaction can explain the long wavelength topography of Enceladus
      • topographic depressions (not rises) are produced above convective upwellings
      • pore compaction can leave a permanent record on the surface of icy satellites
    4. Exposures of olivine-rich rocks in the vicinity of Ares Vallis: Implications for Noachian and Hesperian volcanism (pages 916–929)

      J. H. Wilson and J. F. Mustard

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20067

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      Key Points

      • Noachian and Hesperian volcanics identified in close stratigraphic proximity
      • VNIR spectroscopy is used to characterize Noachian and Hesperian volcanics
      • Differences in spectral character can be refined from previous studies
    5. Orbital eccentricity driven temperature variation at Mercury's poles (pages 930–937)

      Matthew A. Siegler, Bruce G. Bills and D.A. Paige

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20070

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      Key Points

      • Eccentricity variations result in largest temperature changes on Mercury
      • Eccentricity variations on Mercury would impact history of ice stability
      • Thermal effects of eccentricity on Mercury has never been shown
    6. Magnetodynamo lifetimes for rocky, Earth-mass exoplanets with contrasting mantle convection regimes (pages 938–951)

      Joost van Summeren, Eric Gaidos and Clinton P. Conrad

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20077

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      Key Points

      • Long-lived (~8-10.5 Gyr) dynamos are calculated for rocky Earth-mass exoplanets
      • Characterization of exoplanets requires well-determined core properties
      • Venus may lack a magnetic field due to a CMB heat flow lower than Earth's
    7. Global dust storm signal in the meteorological excitation of Mars' rotation (pages 952–962)

      Y. H. Zhou, D. A. Salstein, X. Q. Xu and X. H. Liao

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20087

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      Key Points

      • Global dust storm signal on Mars' diurnal/semidiurnal rotation is found
      • Global dust storm exerts significant influences on Mars' seasonal rotation
      • Cryospheric excitation is negligible on diurnal/semidiurnal scales
    8. Numerical modeling of the formation and structure of the Orientale impact basin (pages 963–979)

      Ross W. K. Potter, David A. Kring, Gareth S. Collins, Walter S. Kiefer and Patrick J. McGovern

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20080

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      Key Points

      • Numerical models of the Orientale basin-forming impact undertaken
      • Orientale basin attributes, including impact energy and melt volume, estimated
      • Model results and Orientale observations are compared with the Chicxulub crater
    9. The impact of a realistic vertical dust distribution on the simulation of the Martian General Circulation (pages 980–993)

      Scott D. Guzewich, Anthony D. Toigo, Mark I. Richardson, Claire E. Newman, Elsayed R. Talaat, Darryn W. Waugh and Timothy H. McConnochie

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20084

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      Key Points

      • The MarsWRF GCM was forced with an empirical dust climatology
      • The climatology is derived from TES limb-scan observations
      • Significant changes to atmospheric thermal structure and circulation resulted
    10. An impact origin for hydrated silicates on Mars: A synthesis (pages 994–1012)

      Livio L. Tornabene, Gordon R. Osinski, Alfred S. McEwen, James J. Wray, Michael A. Craig, Haley M. Sapers and Philip R. Christensen

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20082

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      Key Points

      • Frequent impacts into the volatile-rich crust can produce hydrated silicates.
      • Does not require drastic climate change.
      • Additional impact-induced alteration mechanisms explained.
    11. Mercury's hollows: Constraints on formation and composition from analysis of geological setting and spectral reflectance (pages 1013–1032)

      David T. Blewett, William M. Vaughan, Zhiyong Xiao, Nancy L. Chabot, Brett W. Denevi, Carolyn M. Ernst, Jörn Helbert, Mario D'Amore, Alessandro Maturilli, James W. Head and Sean C. Solomon

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JE004174

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      Key Points

      • Hollows are shallow depressions with relatively high reflectance and blue color
      • Hollows are found in units with reflectance lower than the global average
      • Sulfide minerals could contribute to Mercury's spectral characteristics
    12. Thermal evolution of Mercury as constrained by MESSENGER observations (pages 1033–1044)

      Nathalie C. Michel, Steven A. Hauck II, Sean C. Solomon, Roger J. Phillips, James H. Roberts and Maria T. Zuber

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20049

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      Key Point

      • Mantle convection is possible even with a very thin mantle
    13. Demagnetization by basin-forming impacts on early Mars: Contributions from shock, heat, and excavation (pages 1045–1062)

      Robert J. Lillis, Sarah T. Stewart and Michael Manga

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20085

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      Key Points

      • 1)Shock is more effective than heating in large impact demagnetization
      • 2)Demagnetized area has a power law dependence (0.60-0.72) on impact energy
      • 3)Basin- scaling laws are needed to constrain Mars' primary magnetic carrier
    14. Large shield volcanoes on the Moon (pages 1063–1081)

      Paul D. Spudis, Patrick J. McGovern and Walter S. Kiefer

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20059

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      Key Points

      • Large bulges in lunar maria are shield volcanoes
      • Lunar shields span range of ages similar to mare basalts
      • Lunar shields are comparable in size and shape to those on other objects
    15. Evidence for a short period of hydrologic activity in Newton crater, Mars, near the Hesperian-Amazonian transition (pages 1082–1093)

      R. A. Parsons, J. M. Moore and A. D. Howard

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20088

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      Key Points

      • Fluvial activity lasted less than hundreds of years, likely ~10 yrs
      • A distributed water source (e.g. snowpack) supplied ~1 to 10 cm/day of runoff
      • Either scattered local melting or global warming/melting via volcanic or impacts
    16. Evidence for Noachian flood volcanism in Noachis Terra, Mars, and the possible role of Hellas impact basin tectonics (pages 1094–1113)

      A. D. Rogers and A. H. Nazarian

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20083

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      Key Points

      • Bedrock units in Noachis Terra contain two igneous lithologies and are 3.9 Ga
      • Units probably volcanic and are spatially associated with Hellas ring structures
      • Hellas fracturing and tectonics enabled magma ascent from base of crust
    17. The lunar photoelectron sheath: A change in trapping efficiency during a solar storm (pages 1114–1122)

      W. M. Farrell, A. R. Poppe, M. I. Zimmerman, J. S. Halekas, G. T. Delory and R. M. Killen

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20086

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      Key Points

      • Dayside of Moon-emitted photoelectrons
      • These are usually trapped near surface
      • During a solar storm, the photoelectrons can escape upstream
    18. The fate of early Mars' lost water: The role of serpentinization (pages 1123–1134)

      Eric Chassefière, Benoit Langlais, Yoann Quesnel and François Leblanc

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20089

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      Key Points

      • Serpentinization is a process which may produce magnetite and store water
      • Iron oxidation results in release of H2 to the atmosphere and further H escape
      • An amount of lost water of ~500 m fits both crustal magnetization and D/H ratio
    19. Model-based constraints on the lunar exosphere derived from ARTEMIS pickup ion observations in the terrestrial magnetotail (pages 1135–1147)

      A. R. Poppe, J. S. Halekas, R. Samad, M. Sarantos and G. T. Delory

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20090

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      Key Points

      • We present a model of pick-up ion fluxes at the Moon in the Earth's magnetotail
      • We use the model to fit ARTEMIS lunar pick-up ion observations in the m'tail
      • We improve constraints on lunar exospheric neutral densities and distributions
  2. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    3. Correction
    1. You have free access to this content
      Correction to “Extensive MRO CRISM observations of 1.27 µm O2 airglow in Mars polar night and their comparison to MRO MCS temperature profiles and LMD GCM simulations” (pages 1148–1154)

      R. Todd Clancy, Brad J. Sandor, Michael J. Wolff, Michael D. Smith, Franck Lefèvre, Jean-Baptiste Madeleine, Francois Forget, Scott L. Murchie, Frank P. Seelos, Kim D. Seelos, Hari Nair, Anthony D. Toigo, David Humm, David M. Kass, Armin Kleinböhl and Nicholas Heavens

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20073

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