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Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 1

January 2014

Volume 119, Issue 1

Pages i–iv, 1–312

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue Information (pages i–iv)

      Version of Record online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/jgre.20128

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Exploring fractionation models for Martian magmas (pages 1–18)

      Arya Udry, J. Brian Balta and Harry Y. McSween Jr.

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004445

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      Key Points

      • Fractionation of Martian primary magmas can create diverse compositions
      • Backstay and nakhlite glass formed by fractionation of different primary magmas
      • These pMELTS results can be a guide for further experiments
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      Geology and composition of the Orientale Basin impact melt sheet (pages 19–29)

      Paul D. Spudis, Dayl J. P. Martin and Georgiana Kramer

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004521

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      Key Points

      • Orientale Basin impact melt has been mapped and characterized
      • Basin impact melt is homogeneous
      • No evidence is found for melt sheet differentiation
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      Igneous mineralogy at Bradbury Rise: The first ChemCam campaign at Gale crater (pages 30–46)

      V. Sautter, C. Fabre, O. Forni, M. J. Toplis, A. Cousin, A. M. Ollila, P. Y. Meslin, S. Maurice, R. C. Wiens, D. Baratoux, N. Mangold, S. Le Mouélic, O. Gasnault, G. Berger, J. Lasue, R. A. Anderson, E. Lewin, M. Schmidt, D. Dyar, B. L. Ehlmann, J. Bridges, B. Clark and P. Pinet

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004472

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      Key Points

      • The converging of LIBS data processing points to a mineralogical coherency
      • Mg-poor basaltic rocks correspond to fractionated evolved rocks
      • Feldspath-rich rocks, gravels, and conglomerates, with possible felsic pumice.
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      Lunar heat flow: Regional prospective of the Apollo landing sites (pages 47–63)

      M. A. Siegler and S. E. Smrekar

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004453

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      Key Points

      • Crustal structure effects need to be accounted for in lunar heat flow
      • Lunar mantle heat flow suggests Earth-like mantle composition
      • Heat flow measurement away from PKT region is needed
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      Geochemical diversity in first rocks examined by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater: Evidence for and significance of an alkali and volatile-rich igneous source (pages 64–81)

      M. E. Schmidt, J. L. Campbell, R. Gellert, G. M. Perrett, A. H. Treiman, D. L. Blaney, A. Olilla, F. J. Calef III, L. Edgar, B. E. Elliott, J. Grotzinger, J. Hurowitz, P. L. King, M. E. Minitti, V. Sautter, K. Stack, J. A. Berger, J. C. Bridges, B. L. Ehlmann, O. Forni, L. A. Leshin, K. W. Lewis, S. M. McLennan, D. W. Ming, H. Newsom, I. Pradler, S. W. Squyres, E. M. Stolper, L. Thompson, S. VanBommel and R. C. Wiens

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004481

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      Key Points

      • Rocks at the MSL landing site are diverse and alkali- and volatile metal-rich.
      • Three of the first four rocks studied by APXS form a mixing line in element plots.
      • The alkali-rich nature reflects an igneous source affected by metasomatism.
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      Pressure observations by the Curiosity rover: Initial results (pages 82–92)

      A.-M. Harri, M. Genzer, O. Kemppinen, H. Kahanpää, J. Gomez-Elvira, J. A. Rodriguez-Manfredi, R. Haberle, J. Polkko, W. Schmidt, H. Savijärvi, J. Kauhanen, E. Atlaskin, M. Richardson, T. Siili, M. Paton, M. de la Torre Juarez, C. Newman, S. Rafkin, M. T. Lemmon, M. Mischna, S. Merikallio, H. Haukka, J. Martin-Torres, M.-P. Zorzano, V. Peinado, R. Urqui, A. Lapinette, A. Scodary, T. Mäkinen, L. Vazquez, N. Rennó and the REMS/MSL Science Team

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004423

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      Key Points

      • The performance and data quality of the REMS / MSL pressure observations.
      • MSL pressure observations exhibit local phenomena of the Gale crater area.
      • Small pressure oscillations possibly linked to gravity waves.
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      Modeling of the O+ pickup ion sputtering efficiency dependence on solar wind conditions for the Martian atmosphere (pages 93–108)

      Yung-Ching Wang, Janet G. Luhmann, François Leblanc, Xiaohua Fang, Robert E. Johnson, Yingjuan Ma, Wing-Huen Ip and Lei Li

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004413

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      Key Points

      • When IMF strength is significantly enhanced, the sputtering effects also increase
      • Sputtering escape rate of O under nominal solar wind condition is 2×1024 s−1
      • Asymmetry of the sputtering effects occurs with respect to the electric fields
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      HiRISE observations of new impact craters exposing Martian ground ice (pages 109–127)

      Colin M. Dundas, Shane Byrne, Alfred S. McEwen, Michael T. Mellon, Megan R. Kennedy, Ingrid J. Daubar and Lee Saper

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004482

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      Key Points

      • New impact craters expose ground ice at high latitudes on Mars
      • Ice is found at latitudes as low as 39°N
      • Ice remains visible for many months, indicating low regolith content
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      Fresh shallow valleys in the Martian midlatitudes as features formed by meltwater flow beneath ice (pages 128–153)

      Daniel E. J. Hobley, Alan D. Howard and Jeffrey M. Moore

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004396

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      Key Points

      • We study two suites of fresh shallow valleys in disparate locations on Mars
      • Many (more than tens of) channels travel uphill demanding formation beneath ice cover
      • Valley ages are indistinguishable and likely Late Amazonian
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      Outcrops on lunar crater rims: Implications for rim construction mechanisms, ejecta volumes and excavation depths (pages 154–168)

      Virgil L. Sharpton

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004523

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      Key Points

      • Outcrops on lunar crater walls are uplifted target rocks
      • Uplifted target makes up ~80% of crater rim topography
      • Ejecta emplaced on lunar crater rims is 3 to 4 less than earlier thought
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      Time-dependent rotational stability of dynamic planets with elastic lithospheres (pages 169–188)

      N.-H. Chan, J. X. Mitrovica, A. Daradich, J. R. Creveling, I. Matsuyama and S. Stanley

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004466

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      Key Points

      • We extend a non-linear, time-dependent theory of true polar wander (TPW)
      • Our extended theory includes stabilization by the so-called ″remnant bulge″
      • We illustrate the extended theory using models of TPW on both Earth and Mars
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      Volumetric estimates of ancient water on Mount Sharp based on boxwork deposits, Gale Crater, Mars (pages 189–198)

      Kirsten L. Siebach and John P. Grotzinger

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004508

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      Key Points

      • Boxwork structures on Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp) are identified and mapped
      • Minimum water volume required for boxwork calculated from water-to-cement ratio
      • Implications for Mount Sharp formation are discussed
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      Secondary electron emission from Martian soil simulant (pages 199–209)

      J. Pavlů, M. Beránek, J. Vaverka, J. Šafránková, Z. Němeček and I. Richterová

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004522

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      Key Points

      • Mars dust simulant charging by energetic electrons is investigated
      • Comparison of secondary emission model with laboratory experiment is presented
      • Importance of dust sizes and shapes in presence of energetic electrons is shown
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      Long-term variability of Mars' exosphere based on precise orbital analysis of Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey (pages 210–218)

      Sean Bruinsma, Jeffrey M. Forbes, Jean-Charles Marty, Xiaoli Zhang and Michael D. Smith

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004491

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      Key Points

      • Comparison of Mars and Earth thermospheres
      • Mars exosphere density variability from 1999 to 2010
      • Daily mean densities derived from orbit perturbation analysis
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      Energization of planetary pickup ions in the solar system (pages 219–236)

      R. Jarvinen and E. Kallio

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004534

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      Key Points

      • Energization of atmospheric pickup ions varies considerably in the Solar System
      • Energization is weakest and most perpendicular to solar wind close to the Sun
      • Energization is strongest during a declining phase of a solar cycle
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      Abundances and implications of volatile-bearing species from evolved gas analysis of the Rocknest aeolian deposit, Gale Crater, Mars (pages 237–254)

      Paul Douglas Archer Jr., Heather B. Franz, Brad Sutter, Ricardo D. Arevalo Jr., Patrice Coll, Jennifer L. Eigenbrode, Daniel P. Glavin, John J. Jones, Laurie A. Leshin, Paul R. Mahaffy, Amy C. McAdam, Christopher P. McKay, Douglas W. Ming, Richard V. Morris, Rafael Navarro-González, Paul B. Niles, Alex Pavlov, Steven W. Squyres, Jennifer C. Stern, Andrew Steele and James J. Wray

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004493

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      Key Points

      • Major volatiles detected by SAM were H2O, SO2, CO2, and O2
      • Minor volatiles include HCl, H2S, NH3, NO, and HCN
      • Calculating abundances from counts per second is explained
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      Trace element geochemistry (Li, Ba, Sr, and Rb) using Curiosity's ChemCam: Early results for Gale crater from Bradbury Landing Site to Rocknest (pages 255–285)

      Ann M. Ollila, Horton E. Newsom, Benton Clark III, Roger C. Wiens, Agnes Cousin, Jen G. Blank, Nicolas Mangold, Violaine Sautter, Sylvestre Maurice, Samuel M. Clegg, Olivier Gasnault, Olivier Forni, Robert Tokar, Eric Lewin, M. Darby Dyar, Jeremie Lasue, Ryan Anderson, Scott M. McLennan, John Bridges, Dave Vaniman, Nina Lanza, Cecile Fabre, Noureddine Melikechi, Glynis M. Perrett, John L. Campbell, Penelope L. King, Bruce Barraclough, Dorothea Delapp, Stephen Johnstone, Pierre-Yves Meslin, Anya Rosen-Gooding, Josh Williams and The MSL Science Team

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004517

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      Key Points

      • Quantitative models for Li, Ba, Rb and Sr using ChemCam data are presented
      • Abundances for the first 100 sols in Gale crater are discussed
      • These results represent the first in situ measurements of Li and Ba on Mars
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      A model for the dynamics of crater-centered intrusion: Application to lunar floor-fractured craters (pages 286–312)

      Clément Thorey and Chloé Michaut

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JE004467

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      Key Points

      • A model for the dynamics of crater-centered intrusion is proposed
      • Diverse floor appearances are obtained and correspond to observations
      • The floor appearance depends on the intrusion overlying layer properties

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