Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface (2003–2012)

Cover image for Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface (2003–2012)

September 2012

Volume 117, Issue F3

Currently known as: Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface

    1. Permafrost degradation as a control on hydrogeological regime shifts in a warming climate

      V. F. Bense, H. Kooi, G. Ferguson and T. Read

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002143

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Groundwater cycling will strongly intensify with permafrost degradation
      • Current permafrost conditions are crucial to understand
      • Talik zones are important to facilitate surface water groundwater interaction
    2. A probabilistic description of the bed load sediment flux: 4. Fickian diffusion at low transport rates

      David Jon Furbish, Ashley E. Ball and Mark W. Schmeeckle

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002356

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Bed load particle motions possess distinct periodicities
      • Mean-squared displacement is sensitive to harmonics in particle motions
      • Particle diffusion relevant to calculating sediment flux is Fickian
    3. Methodology for reconstructing wind direction, wind speed and duration of wind events from aeolian cross-strata

      Erin N. Eastwood, Gary Kocurek, David Mohrig and Travis Swanson

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002368

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A methodology is presented to reconstruct wind history from aeolian cross-strata
    4. A probabilistic description of the bed load sediment flux: 3. The particle velocity distribution and the diffusive flux

      David Jon Furbish, John C. Roseberry and Mark W. Schmeeckle

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002355

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Quasi-steady transport involves a balance of fluxes in momentum space
      • The distribution of forces acting on particles varies with momentum state
      • Simulations reproduce velocity, hop distance and travel time distributions
    5. A probabilistic description of the bed load sediment flux: 2. Particle activity and motions

      John C. Roseberry, Mark W. Schmeeckle and David Jon Furbish

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002353

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Bed load particle activity systematically varies with scale
      • Active particle configurations are preferentially selected by turbulence
      • Particle velocities possess an exponential-like distribution
    6. A probabilistic description of the bed load sediment flux: 1. Theory

      David Jon Furbish, Peter K. Haff, John C. Roseberry and Mark W. Schmeeckle

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002352

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • The bed load flux involves advective and diffusive parts
      • Gradients in particle activity induce a diffusive flux
      • Particle positions and velocities define a statistical ensemble
    7. Exhumation and relief development in the Pelvoux and Dora-Maira massifs (western Alps) assessed by spectral analysis and inversion of thermochronological age transects

      Romain Beucher, Peter van der Beek, Jean Braun and Geoffrey E. Batt

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002240

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • New thermochronological ages
      • Inverse and spectral analysis of dataset
      • Relief evolution and exhumation rates
    8. Modeling sub-sea permafrost in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf: The Laptev Sea region

      D. J. Nicolsky, V. E. Romanovsky, N. N. Romanovskii, A. L. Kholodov, N. E. Shakhova and I. P. Semiletov

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002358

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Review of the underlying assumptions of previous models
      • Development of an up-to-date model of sub-sea permafrost in Laptev Sea
      • Development of open taliks underneath submerged thaw lakes on the shelf
    9. Rapid development of anisotropic ice-crystal-alignment fabrics inferred from englacial radar polarimetry, central West Antarctica

      Kenichi Matsuoka, Donovan Power, Shuji Fujita and Charles F. Raymond

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002440

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • C-axis fabric patterns are highly anisotropic near the ice-flow divide
      • Azimuth of c-axis fabric patterns varies with depth
      • Near surface c-axis patterns are consistent with the current surface strain
    10. Spatial distribution of glacial erosion rates in the St. Elias range, Alaska, inferred from a realistic model of glacier dynamics

      Rachel Headley, Bernard Hallet, Gerard Roe, Edwin D. Waddington and Eric Rignot

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002291

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Observations and modeling can be used to constrain unknown glacier thicknesses
      • A glacier's pattern of erosion is heavily influenced by its geometry
      • High erosion rates for the Seward Throat are consistent with existing studies
    11. A one-dimensional eco-geomorphic model of marsh response to sea level rise: Wind effects, dynamics of the marsh border and equilibrium

      N. Tambroni and G. Seminara

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002363

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Channel-marsh equilibrium is a rather exceptional and unstable state
      • Wind currents may also play a role in the dynamics of the channel-marsh border
    12. Soil genesis on the island of Bermuda in the Quaternary: The importance of African dust transport and deposition

      Daniel R. Muhs, James R. Budahn, Joseph M. Prospero, Gary Skipp and Stanley R. Herwitz

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002366

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Genesis of soils on Bermuda has been debated for a century
      • Parent materials can be distinguished geochemically
      • Bermuda soils are derived from African dust and local volcanics
    13. The effect of hydrographs on bed load transport and bed sediment spatial arrangement

      Luca Mao

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002428

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Bedload shows clockwise hysteresis during simulated stepped hydrographs
      • Bedload grain size and reference shear stress are larger during falling limbs
      • Bedload hysteresis is caused by a change in the bed surface organization
    14. Experimental meandering river with chute cutoffs

      W. M. van Dijk, W. I. van de Lageweg and M. G. Kleinhans

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002314

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Necessary conditions for meandering is a sustained perturbation
      • Bend amplitude is limited by chute cutoff in high mobility gravel bed rivers
      • Interaction between bend growth, floodplain and overbank flow leads to cutoffs
    15. Spatial variation of englacial radar attenuation: Modeling approach and application to the Vostok flowline

      Joseph A. MacGregor, Kenichi Matsuoka, Edwin D. Waddington, Dale P. Winebrenner and Frank Pattyn

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002327

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A uniform radar-attenuation rate is inadequate for many regions of an ice sheet
      • Temperature models and ice-core chemistry are essential for attenuation modeling
      • Impurity-deposition modes can affect radar attenuation significantly
    16. Macroholes in stalagmites and the search for lost water

      Nurit Shtober Zisu, Henry P. Schwarcz, Norman Konyer, Tom Chow and Michael D. Noseworthy

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002288

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Stalagmite's inner structure is visualized by CT and MRI
      • Water escape from macroholes
      • Axial and off-axis holes represent different genetic systems
    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The crystal fabric of ice from full-waveform borehole sonic logging

      Alessio Gusmeroli, Erin C. Pettit, Joseph H. Kennedy and Catherine Ritz

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002343

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • We derive the relations between ice-fabric and elastic speeds
      • We can now interpret borehole speeds to investigate the climate-fabric link
      • We can now evaluate how ice rheology changes with depth
    18. Modeling large scale shoreline sand waves under oblique wave incidence

      N. van den Berg, A. Falqués and F. Ribas

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002177

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Shoreline sand waves emerge from the feedback between morphology and wave field
      • Wave angles persistently larger than 45 deg are required at the depth of closure
      • Sand waves with a length of 2-5 km and amplitudes up to 120 m develop in 13 yr
    19. Entrainment of sediment particles by retrograde vortices: Test of hypothesis using near-particle observations

      Fu-Chun Wu and Wu-Rong Shih

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002242

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Pre- and post-entrainment quadrant structures at near-particle measurement location
      • Confirms theoretically predicted quadrant signatures observed at different locations
      • Discrepancy due to misaligned LDV measurement plane and direction of entrainment
    20. Straightforward reconstruction of 3D surfaces and topography with a camera: Accuracy and geoscience application

      M. R. James and S. Robson

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002289

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Computer vision techniques can be used to derive DEMs from photographs
      • Surface models of coastal cliffs permit geostatistical analysis of erosion
      • Model precision ratios generally exceed 1:1000 thus are useful in geosciences
    21. Probabilistic prediction of barrier-island response to hurricanes

      Nathaniel G. Plant and Hilary F. Stockdon

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002326

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A conceptual model of beach response to storms is formulated probabilistically
      • An extension of this model using more input variables performs even better
      • A sensitivity analysis demonstrated why additional inputs performed better
    22. Sediment entrainment by debris flows: In situ measurements from the headwaters of a steep catchment

      S. W. McCoy, J. W. Kean, J. A. Coe, G. E. Tucker, D. M. Staley and T. A. Wasklewicz

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002278

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Entrainment rates were 2-10x faster for wet channel sediment than dry sediment
      • Flow induced near-surface pore pressures facilitated progressive entrainment
      • Entrainment occurred during dense granular surges and water-rich debris floods
    23. Sediment transport by runoff on debris-mantled dryland hillslopes

      Katerina Michaelides and Gareth J. Martin

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002415

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A new physics-based model of hillslope sediment transport is presented
      • Sediment supply depends on interaction between hillslope and rainfall properties
      • Findings have implications for nonlocal controls and geomorphic transport laws
    24. Impact of glacial erosion on 10Be concentrations in fluvial sediments of the Marsyandi catchment, central Nepal

      V. Godard, D. W. Burbank, D. L. Bourlès, B. Bookhagen, R. Braucher and G. B. Fisher

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002230

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • We present a high-density data set for detrital 10Be in a glaciated catchment
      • We decompose the different contributions to the sediment flux
      • We invert our data set to constrain catchment-scale glacial erosion
    25. The effects of transverse bed topography variations in ice-flow models

      O. V. Sergienko

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002203

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Flowband model has strong limitations associated with its assumptions
      • Flowband model performance is better with width-averaged topography
      • Field observations need to take into account spatial variability of ice flow
    26. Subglacial melt channels and fracture in the floating part of Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica

      David G. Vaughan, Hugh F. J. Corr, Robert A. Bindschadler, Pierre Dutrieux, G. Hilmar Gudmundsson, Adrian Jenkins, Thomas Newman, Patricia Vornberger and Duncan J. Wingham

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002360

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Ocean melting from an ice shelf base causes surface and basal crevassing
      • Basal crevassing can be explained by finite-element modeling
      • Increased melting of ice shelves may eventually cause them to collapse
    27. A general two-phase debris flow model

      Shiva P. Pudasaini

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002186

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • This paper presents a new, generalized and unified two-phase debris flow model
      • Includes non-Newtonian viscous stress, virtual mass, generalized drag, buoyancy
      • New model adequately describes complex two-phase debris flow, sediment transport
    28. Determination of the macroscopic optical properties of snow based on exact morphology and direct pore-level heat transfer modeling

      Sophia Haussener, Mathias Gergely, Martin Schneebeli and Aldo Steinfeld

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JF002332

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Snow's optical properties heavily rely on exact microstructure
      • Direct pore-level radiation modeling leads to accurate snow's optical properties
      • In-dept investigaiton of absorption in snow on the pore-level scale is achieved
    29. Snow Metamorphism and Albedo Process (SMAP) model for climate studies: Model validation using meteorological and snow impurity data measured at Sapporo, Japan

      Masashi Niwano, Teruo Aoki, Katsuyuki Kuchiki, Masahiro Hosaka and Yuji Kodama

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002239

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A physical snowpack model named SMAP is developed
      • The model is validated in detail using observations
      • Snowpack durations at Sapporo were shortened by impurities
    30. Modeling glacier thickness distribution and bed topography over entire mountain ranges with GlabTop: Application of a fast and robust approach

      A. Linsbauer, F. Paul and W. Haeberli

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002313

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Modeling ice thickness distribution of large glacier samples
      • Analysis of subglacial topography reveals overdeepenings
      • Accuarcy assessment based on gpr-data and model inter-comparison
    31. Elementary theory of bed-sediment entrainment by debris flows and avalanches

      Richard M. Iverson

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002189

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Momentum conservation constrains bed-sediment entrainment rates by mass flows
      • Pore pressures generated in overridden bed sediment influence entrainment rates
      • Flow momentum can grow unstably in the presence of entrainment
    32. Net currents in the wave bottom boundary layer: On waveshape streaming and progressive wave streaming

      Wouter M. Kranenburg, Jan S. Ribberink, Rob E. Uittenbogaard and Suzanne J. M. H. Hulscher

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002070

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Wave shape streaming and progressive wave streaming are counteracting currents
      • We present and validate a numerical model on net currents in wave boundary layer
      • Wave and bed conditions influence streaming, a parameter study shows how
    33. Erosion of the Rwenzori Mountains, East African Rift, from in situ-produced cosmogenic10Be

      S. Roller, H. Wittmann, M. Kastowski and M. Hinderer

      Article first published online: 11 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002117

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Denudation rates are low with respect to strong uplift due to active tectonics
      • The extensional fault block is subject to erosion under a tropical climate
      • In average, denudation rates of the Rwenzori Mountains are at 60 mm/kyr
    34. Seismic multiplet response triggered by melt at Blood Falls, Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

      Joshua D. Carmichael, Erin C. Pettit, Matt Hoffman, Andrew Fountain and Bernard Hallet

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002221

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Surface melt triggers repetitive microseismic multiplets in cold ice
      • Surface energy balance modeling used with seismic observations
      • Network based correlation detection identifies repeating icequakes
    35. Short-term variability in Greenland Ice Sheet motion forced by time-varying meltwater drainage: Implications for the relationship between subglacial drainage system behavior and ice velocity

      Ian Bartholomew, Peter Nienow, Andrew Sole, Douglas Mair, Thomas Cowton and Matt A. King

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002220

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • High-resolution GPS data show short-term variations in Greenland ice motion
      • Velocity changes are driven by meltwater input to the subglacial drainage system
      • Time-varying behavior of the drainage system explains patterns in ice velocity
    36. Spatiotemporal interpolation of elevation changes derived from satellite altimetry for Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland

      R. T. W. L. Hurkmans, J. L. Bamber, L. S. Sørensen, I. R. Joughin, C. H. Davis and W. B. Krabill

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JF002072

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Velocity can help interpolation of elevation change from satellite altimetry
      • Thinning rates in outlet glaciers may be underestimated due to scarce sampling
      • Interpolation using velocity reduces errors w.r.t. airborne data

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION