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Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences (2005–2012)

Cover image for Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences (2005–2012)

June 2012

Volume 117, Issue G2

Currently known as: Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences

    1. You have free access to this content
      The 15N natural abundance of the N lost from an N-saturated subtropical forest in southern China

      Keisuke Koba, Yunting Fang, Jiangming Mo, Wei Zhang, Xiankai Lu, Lei Liu, Tao Zhang, Yu Takebayashi, Sakae Toyoda, Naohiro Yoshida, Keisuke Suzuki, Muneoki Yoh and Keishi Senoo

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2010JG001615

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      Key Points

      • The d15N of discharge N (Td15N of discharge N (TDN and NO3-)) was not low as expected
      • Soil-emitted N2O was strongly 15N-depleted and can increase the ecosystem d15N
      • The 15N enrichment of ecosystem depends on the gaseous N loss, not discharge N loss
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      The influence of mineral characteristics on organic matter content, composition, and stability of topsoils under long-term arable and forest land use

      M. Kaiser, R. H. Ellerbrock, M. Wulf, S. Dultz, C. Hierath and M. Sommer

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001712

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      Key Points

      • Land use–derived carbon accumulation is site specific
      • Organic carbon stocks increase with increasing stocks of exchangeable Ca
      • Na4P2O7-extractable organic matter is more stable in arable than in forest soils
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      Observations and assessment of forest carbon dynamics following disturbance in North America

      S. J. Goetz, B. Bond-Lamberty, B. E. Law, J. A. Hicke, C. Huang, R. A. Houghton, S. McNulty, T. O'Halloran, M. Harmon, A. J. H. Meddens, E. M. Pfeifer, D. Mildrexler and E. S. Kasischke

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001733

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      Key Points

      • Forest regrowth after disturbance is heterogeneous
      • Disturbance severity and history are key uncertainties
      • Multiple lines of evidence extremely useful
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      Peat accumulation in drained thermokarst lake basins in continuous, ice-rich permafrost, northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

      Miriam C. Jones, Guido Grosse, Benjamin M. Jones and Katey Walter Anthony

      Article first published online: 7 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001766

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      Key Points

      • Carbon accumulation in drained lake basins is a significant carbon reservoir
      • Satellite-derived parameters (NDVI and MNF) related to measured peat depths
      • NDVI/MNF analyses show drained thermokarst lake basins store 6.5 Tg C as peat
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      Warming-enhanced preferential microbial mineralization of humified boreal forest soil organic matter: Interpretation of soil profiles along a climate transect using laboratory incubations

      Jianwei Li, Susan Ziegler, Chad S. Lane and Sharon A. Billings

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001769

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      Key Points

      • Laboratory warming induced relatively greater mineralization of humified SOM
      • Warmer soil profile associated with relatively smaller amounts of older SOC
      • Soil profile and laboratory data are consistent across divergent timescales
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      Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional landform positions

      Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, Jennifer W. Harden, Margaret S. Torn, Markus Kleber, Sarah D. Burton and John Harte

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001790

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      Key Points

      • Eroding and depositional landform positions vary in terms of soil carbon storage
      • Mechanisms of SOM stabilization depend on nature of landform position considered
      • Significant fraction of SOM in depositional positions can be easily mineralized
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      Controls on gas transfer velocities in a large river

      Jake J. Beaulieu, William D. Shuster and Jacob A. Rebholz

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001794

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      Key Points

      • Models of gas transfer velocities in large rivers are poorly developed
      • Wind and water currents influence gas exchange in large rivers
      • Gas exchange in large rivers may be enhanced by rising microbubbles
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      Simulating the decadal- to millennial-scale dynamics of morphology and sequestered carbon mobilization of two thermokarst lakes in NW Alaska

      M. A. Kessler, L. J. Plug and K. M. Walter Anthony

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001796

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      Key Points

      • A 3-D model simulates thaw lakes and quantifies permafrost carbon mobilization
      • Thermokarst lake expansion is sensitive to topography and landscape history
      • Lake expansion into virgin yedoma dominates CH4 production
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      Validation and comparison of two soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer models for tropical Africa

      T. Akkermans, D. Lauwaet, M. Demuzere, G. Vogel, Y. Nouvellon, J. Ardö, B. Caquet, A. De Grandcourt, L. Merbold, W. Kutsch and N. Van Lipzig

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001802

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      Key Points

      • Default input data sets are not always adequate for application in the tropics
      • Better performance is achieved with higher model complexity and physical realism
      • Adjusting input data to observed values can significantly improve simple models
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      Variable source and age of different forms of carbon released from natural peatland pipes

      M. F. Billett, K. J. Dinsmore, R. P. Smart, M. H. Garnett, J. Holden, P. Chapman, A. J. Baird, R. Grayson and A. W. Stott

      Article first published online: 7 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001807

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      Key Points

      • Carbon released from peatland pipes is isotopically variable
      • Pipes can release old, deep peat CO2 and POC (but not DOC) to the atmosphere
      • Sources of CO2 and CH4 are more variable than DOC and POC
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      Hydroecological model predictions indicate wetter and more diverse soil water regimes and vegetation types following floodplain restoration

      Eric G. Booth and Steven P. Loheide II

      Article first published online: 27 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001831

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      Key Points

      • Simulated soil moisture predicts more wetland vegetation following restoration
      • Differential hydroecological response leads to higher vegetation type diversity
      • Transferable hydroecological framework provides predictions of ecosystem change
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      Land use control of stream nitrate concentrations in mountainous coastal California watersheds

      Blair M. Goodridge and John M. Melack

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001833

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      Key Points

      • Watershed nitrate versus runoff patterns consistent within land use types
      • Storm nitrate concentrations less variable than baseflow nitrate concentrations
      • Upland watershed regions homogenize storm nitrate concentrations
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      Drought-induced mortality of a Bornean tropical rain forest amplified by climate change

      Tomo'omi Kumagai and Amilcare Porporato

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001835

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      Key Points

      • A Southeast Asian tropical rainforest mortality amplified under El Nino events
      • Drought-induced mortality of a tropical rainforest amplified by climate change
      • Stochastic descriptions of ecosystem response to climatic fluctuations
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      Modeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 1986–2005, by coupling a large-scale hydrological model and a process-based methane model

      Xiaoliang Lu and Qianlai Zhuang

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001843

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      Key Points

      • Water table information is explicitly addressed in the methane modeling
      • The effect of freezing and thawing processes is also explicitly considered
      • Methane emissions in the Yukon River basin from 1986 to 2005
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      Effect of Scirpus mariqueter on nitrous oxide emissions from a subtropical monsoon estuarine wetland

      Zhongjie Yu, Yangjie Li, Huanguang Deng, Dongqi Wang, Zhenlou Chen and Shiyuan Xu

      Article first published online: 25 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001850

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      Key Points

      • Nitrous oxide is one of the most important greenhouse gases
      • Wetland plant is the key factor controlling nitrous oxide emission
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      Anaerobic oxidation of methane in tropical and boreal soils: Ecological significance in terrestrial methane cycling

      Steven J. Blazewicz, Dorthe G. Petersen, Mark P. Waldrop and Mary K. Firestone

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001864

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      Key Points

      • Anaerobic oxidation of methane can occur in tropical and boreal soils
      • Addition of terminal electron acceptors inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane
      • Anaerobic oxidation of methane likely mediated by methanogens in our soils
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      Time-series analysis of high-resolution ebullition fluxes from a stratified, freshwater lake

      Charuleka Varadharajan and Harold F. Hemond

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001866

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      Key Points

      • Large bubble releases can occur over very short periods of time
      • Bubbling episodes occur during periods of low hydrostatic pressure
      • Wavelets can be used to identify ebullition events in high-resolution data sets
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      Variability in the carbon isotopic composition of foliage carbon pools (soluble carbohydrates, waxes) and respiration fluxes in southeastern U.S. pine forests

      Behzad Mortazavi, Maureen H. Conte, Jeffrey P. Chanton, J. C. Weber, Timothy A. Martin and Wendell P. Cropper Jr.

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001867

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      Key Points

      • Two-year measurements of 13C of pools and fluxes
      • Estimating photosynthetic discrimination from proxies can be misleading
      • The 13C of assimilated and respired CO2 is insensitive to VPD
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      Mapping the degree of decomposition and thaw remobilization potential of soil organic matter in discontinuous permafrost terrain

      Gustaf Hugelius, Joyanto Routh, Peter Kuhry and Patrick Crill

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001873

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      Key Points

      • Degree of decomposition in permafrost SOM can be mapped using low-cost methods
      • >70% of soil C is stored in SOM with a low degree of decomposition
      • Permafrost is not controlling degree of decomposition
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      Land use/land cover and scale influences on in-stream nitrogen uptake kinetics

      Tim Covino, Brian McGlynn and Rebecca McNamara

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001874

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      Key Points

      • LULC and scale influence stream nitrogen uptake kinetics
      • In-stream nutrient concentrations can be poor indicators of uptake kinetics
      • Nitrogen uptake and biological community metrics strongly correlated to LULC
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      Controls on in situ oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon dynamics in peats of a temperate fen

      Cristian Estop-Aragonés, Klaus-Holger Knorr and Christian Blodau

      Article first published online: 5 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001888

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      Key Points

      • Changes in water table induce changes in the gas content in peat soils
      • Compacted peat and high ash content prevent oxygen intrusion upon drying
      • Logistic regression to predict the oxic-anoxic boundary in compacted peat
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      From atmospheric winds to fracture ventilation: Cause and effect

      Uri Nachshon, Maria Dragila and Noam Weisbrod

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001898

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      Key Points

      • Surface winds induce fracture ventilation
      • Fracture ventilation enhances air circulation at the Earth-atmosphere interface
      • Fracture ventilation affects biogeochemical cycles near the Earth surface
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      A conceptual model for the blooming behavior and persistence of the benthic mat-forming diatomDidymosphenia geminata in oligotrophic streams

      James D. S. Cullis, Carole-Anne Gillis, Max L. Bothwell, Cathy Kilroy, Aaron Packman and Marwan Hassan

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001891

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      Key Points

      • Synthesis of existing information on ecology of D. geminata
      • Develop conceptual model for ecology of the stalk forming diatom D. geminata
      • Recommendations for future research and potential mitigation options
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      A model-based evaluation of woody plant encroachment effects on coupled carbon and water cycles

      F. C. O'Donnell and K. K. Caylor

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001899

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      Key Points

      • We developed a model to infer soil C change following woody encroachment
      • Encroachment increased productivity most in sparsely-vegetated landscapes
      • Shrublands have greater spatial heterogeneity in soil C decomposition rates
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      Trends in CO2 exchange in a high Arctic tundra heath, 2000–2010

      Magnus Lund, Julie M. Falk, Thomas Friborg, Herbert N. Mbufong, Charlotte Sigsgaard, Henrik Soegaard and Mikkel P. Tamstorf

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001901

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      Key Points

      • Temperature controlled the interannual variation in CO2 exchange components
      • The increase in GPP leveled off at the high end of observed temperature range
      • A continued warming may turn the site into a source of carbon
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      Catastrophic impact of typhoon waves on coral communities in the Ryukyu Islands under global warming

      Chuki Hongo, Hideki Kawamata and Kazuhisa Goto

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001902

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      Key Points

      • Massive corals will survive in the shallow lagoons under super-extreme typhoons
      • Tabular coral will be severely damaged on the reef in the near future
      • Super-extreme typhoons will cause a loss of species diversity in reef ecosystems
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      Seven-year trends of CO2exchange in a tundra ecosystem affected by long-term permafrost thaw

      Christian Trucco, Edward A. G. Schuur, Susan M. Natali, E. Fay Belshe, Rosvel Bracho and Jason Vogel

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001907

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      Key Points

      • Permafrost thaw can impact ecosystem C dynamics
      • Increased permafrost thaw led to greater growing season C uptake
      • Winter respiration offset some growing season C uptake
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      Impact of wildfire on the thermal behavior of northern peatlands: Observations and model simulations

      N. Kettridge, D. K. Thompson and J. M. Waddington

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001910

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      Key Points

      • Evaporation can shut down in burnt peatlands; an important negative feedback
      • Low evaporation produces substantial increases in peat surface temperatures
      • Second negative feedback minimizes temperature increases within the subsurface
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      Reconciling leaf physiological traits and canopy flux data: Use of the TRY and FLUXNET databases in the Community Land Model version 4

      Gordon B. Bonan, Keith W. Oleson, Rosie A. Fisher, Gitta Lasslop and Markus Reichstein

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001913

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      Key Points

      • CLM overestimates gross primary production
      • Shaded leaf photosynthesis erroneously contributes to high GPP
      • Multi-scale leaf, canopy, and global data are needed for model evaluation
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      How the insulating properties of snow affect soil carbon distribution in the continental pan-Arctic area

      I. Gouttevin, M. Menegoz, F. Dominé, G. Krinner, C. Koven, P. Ciais, C. Tarnocai and J. Boike

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001916

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      Key Points

      • Measurements reveal that taiga snow is more insulative than tundra snow
      • Insulation by taiga snow warms the soil by up to 12 K in winter
      • Insulation by taiga snow reduces the modelled soil carbon stocks in the Arctic
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      Using environmental variables and soil processes to forecast denitrification potential and nitrous oxide fluxes in coastal plain wetlands across different land uses

      Jennifer L. Morse, Marcelo Ardón and Emily S. Bernhardt

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001923

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      Key Points

      • N2O flux across wetland land uses was correlated with CO2 flux and temperature
      • Soil denitrification potential was related to pH and soil nitrogen content
      • Soil denitrification potential was uncorrelated with nitrous oxide flux
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      Attributing carbon changes in conterminous U.S. forests to disturbance and non-disturbance factors from 1901 to 2010

      Fangmin Zhang, Jing M. Chen, Yude Pan, Richard A. Birdsey, Shuanghe Shen, Weimin Ju and Liming He

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001930

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      Key Points

      • Disturbance factors were the determinant driver of C changes in U.S. forests
      • Disturbance effects outweighed or were equivalent to non-disturbance effects
      • The disturbance and non-disturbance effects had distinct regional patterns
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      The potential for microbial life in the highest-elevation (>6000 m.a.s.l.) mineral soils of the Atacama region

      R. C. Lynch, A. J. King, Mariá E. Farías, P. Sowell, Christian Vitry and S. K. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG001961

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      Key Points

      • Extreme freeze thaw cycles above 6000 meters
      • Carbon monoxide supports high-elevation life
      • Soil C and N levels are extremely low above 6000 meters
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      Does eddy-eddy interaction control surface phytoplankton distribution and carbon export in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre?

      Lionel Guidi, Paulo H. R. Calil, Solange Duhamel, Karin M. Björkman, Scott C. Doney, George A. Jackson, Binglin Li, Matthew J. Church, Sasha Tozzi, Zbigniew S. Kolber, Kelvin J. Richards, Allison A. Fong, Ricardo M. Letelier, Gabriel Gorsky, Lars Stemmann and David M. Karl

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG001984

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      Key Points

      • Eddy-eddy interaction generates submesoscale features in the NSPG
      • Horizontal stirring may control the spatial distribution of Trichodesmium
      • The mesoscale field mediates POC export by surface frontogenesis
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      Nitrate removal in deep sediments of a nitrogen-rich river network: A test of a conceptual model

      Robert S. Stelzer and Lynn A. Bartsch

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG001990

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      Key Points

      • Our conceptual model of nitrate removal in deep sediments was broadly supported
      • Nitrate:chloride ratios declined in most cases from deep to shallow groundwater
      • Denitrification at depth accounted for about 70 percent of total denitrification
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      Quantifying soil surface change in degraded drylands: Shrub encroachment and effects of fire and vegetation removal in a desert grassland

      Joel B. Sankey, Sujith Ravi, Cynthia S. A. Wallace, Robert H. Webb and Travis E. Huxman

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002002

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      Key Points

      • Fire promotes reversibility to shrub encroachment through soil homogenization
      • Soil surface roughness is reduced 4 years post-fire in shrub-grass ecotone
      • Relative spatial dependence of roughness is greater on fire and less on control

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