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Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences (2005–2012)

Cover image for Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences (2005–2012)

December 2012

Volume 117, Issue G4

Currently known as: Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences

    1. You have free access to this content
      Nutrients and particulate organic matter discharged by the Changjiang (Yangtze River): Seasonal variations and temporal trends

      Lei Gao, Daoji Li and Yanwei Zhang

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG001952

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      Key Points

      • Seasonal variations of nutrients and POC discharged by Changjiang are described
      • Annual fluxes of nutrients and POC discharged by Changjiang are calculated
      • Temporal trends of nutrients and POC discharged by Changjiang are evaluated
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      Hydrogeomorphology of the hyporheic zone: Stream solute and fine particle interactions with a dynamic streambed

      J. W. Harvey, J. D. Drummond, R. L. Martin, L. E. McPhillips, A. I. Packman, D. J. Jerolmack, S. H. Stonedahl, A. F. Aubeneau, A. H. Sawyer, L. G. Larsen and C. R. Tobias

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002043

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      Key Points

      • Hyporheic exchange of solutes and fine particles was linked to bedform dynamics
      • Solutes and fines stored in hyporheic were differentially mobilized by flood
      • Flood duration, bedform relaxation, and hyporheic residence time were controls
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      Surface micro-topography causes hot spots of biogeochemical activity in wetland systems: A virtual modeling experiment

      S. Frei, K. H. Knorr, S. Peiffer and J. H. Fleckenstein

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002012

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      Key Points

      • Biogeochemical hot spots in wetlands can form because of micro-topography
      • Interactions between hydrology and biogeochemistry are simulated
      • Importance of understanding hydrological/biogeochemical feebacks within wetlands
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      Improving the responses of the Australian community land surface model (CABLE) to seasonal drought

      Longhui Li, Ying-Ping Wang, Qiang Yu, Bernard Pak, Derek Eamus, Junhua Yan, Eva van Gorsel and Ian T. Baker

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002038

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      Key Points

      • The CABLE model with inclusion of root functioning was presented
      • The modified CABLE model improved its performance in response to drought
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      Reoccupation of floodplains by rivers and its relation to the age structure of floodplain vegetation

      Christopher P. Konrad

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011JG001906

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      Key Points

      • Temporal scaling of channel occupation of floodplains depends on reoccupation
      • Probability of reoccupation decreases with time since an area was abandoned
      • Power function accounts for reoccupation and floodplain vegetation age structure
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      Retrospective retrieval of long-term consistent global leaf area index (1981–2011) from combined AVHRR and MODIS data

      Yang Liu, Ronggao Liu and Jing M. Chen

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002084

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      Key Points

      • Generate a long-term series (1981-2011) of global LAI product
      • A method to produce a temporally consistent LAI product from MODIS and AVHRR
      • The LAI quality from the AVHRR can be improved with the aid of MODIS
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      Scaling flow path processes to fluvial landscapes: An integrated field and model assessment of temperature and dissolved oxygen dynamics in a river-floodplain-aquifer system

      Ashley M. Helton, Geoffrey C. Poole, Robert A. Payn, Clemente Izurieta and Jack A. Stanford

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002025

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      Key Points

      • We linked temperature and oxygen models with a floodplain hydrologic model
      • The model fit dissolved oxygen measured across the floodplain and seasons
      • The model illustrates spatiotemporal heterogeneity within the alluvial aquifer
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      Influence of the spatial extent and resolution of input data on soil carbon models in Florida, USA

      Gustavo M. Vasques, S. Grunwald and D. Brenton Myers

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG001982

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      Key Points

      • Soil carbon models are scale-dependent
      • Soil carbon models improve when spatial extents are increased
      • Soil carbon models degrade as resolution of input data increases
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      Linking runoff and erosion dynamics to nutrient fluxes in a degrading dryland landscape

      Katerina Michaelides, Debbie Lister, John Wainwright and Anthony J. Parsons

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002071

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      Key Points

      • There are important linkages between physical and biogeochemical processes
      • These linkages are controlled by plant structure
      • Grasslands lose more nutrients than shrubs due to high losses of fine sediment
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      Assessment of the spatial distributions of total- and methyl-mercury and their relationship to sediment geochemistry from a whole-lake perspective

      J. Rydberg, P. Rosén, L. Lambertsson, F. De Vleeschouwer, S. Tomasdotter and R. Bindler

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG001992

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      Key Points

      • Hg and especially methyl-Hg is highly spatially variable also in a single lake
      • Total-Hg is controlled by either fine-grained mineral matter or organic matter
      • Methyl-Hg seems to mostly originate from in-lake methylation
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      Bioavailability and diagenetic state of dissolved organic matter in riparian groundwater

      Simone Peter, Yuan Shen, Karl Kaiser, Ronald Benner and Edith Durisch-Kaiser

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002072

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      Key Points

      • A degradation index (DI) is established for groundwater DOM
      • The DI characterizes DOM reactivity and diagenesis in groundwater
      • Riparian groundwater can exhibit considerable patchiness in DOM reactivity
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      Large difference of inhibitive effect of nitrogen deposition on soil methane oxidation between plantations with N-fixing tree species and non-N-fixing tree species

      Wei Zhang, Xiaomin Zhu, Lei Liu, Shenglei Fu, Hao Chen, Juan Huang, Xiankai Lu, Zhanfeng Liu and Jiangming Mo

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002094

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      Key Points

      • N input significantly decreased CH4 uptake in N-fixing tree species plantation
      • Difference inhibitive effect of N input on CH4 uptake between both plantations
      • N deposition would decrease the capability of N-fixing plantations for CH4 sink
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      Upscaling of CO2 fluxes from heterogeneous tundra plant communities in Arctic Alaska

      Anja Kade, M. Syndonia Bret-Harte, Eugénie S. Euskirchen, Colin Edgar and Randy A. Fulweber

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002065

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      Key Points

      • GEE, ER, and NEE differ along a topographic gradient with various vegetation types
      • NEE and GEE scaled up from chambers compared well to eddy covariance towers
      • Plot-level carbon efflux did not agree well with flux tower data in winter
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      Evaluation of uncertainties in N2O and NO fluxes from agricultural soil using a hierarchical Bayesian model

      Kazuya Nishina, Hiroko Akiyama, Seiichi Nishimura, Shigeto Sudo and Kazuyuki Yagi

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002157

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      Key Points

      • We developed the HB model to evaluate N oxides flux from agricultural soils
      • The HB model revealed the sensitivities of the fluxes to environmental factors
      • The HB model evaluated the uncertainties in the estimation of fluxes and its EF
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      Carbon dioxide exchange rates from short- and long-hydroperiod Everglades freshwater marsh

      K. L. Jimenez, G. Starr, C. L. Staudhammer, J. L. Schedlbauer, H. W. Loescher, S. L. Malone and S. F. Oberbauer

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002117

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      Key Points

      • Hydrology drives carbon fluxes
      • Freshwater marshes were small sink or small source to our surprise
      • Ecosystem respiration dominated the two ecosystems during our study
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      Modeling the effect of tides and waves on benthic biofilms

      G. Mariotti and S. Fagherazzi

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002064

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      Key Points

      • Hysteresis due to biostabilization
      • Competition between growth and disturbance time scale
      • Predict biofilm distribution with depth
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      Distribution characteristics of transparent exopolymer particles in the Pearl River estuary, China

      Cui-Ci Sun, You-Shao Wang, Qian P. Li, Wei-Zhong Yue, Yu-Tu Wang, Fu-Lin Sun and Ya-Lan Peng

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG001951

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      Key Points

      • TEP in PRE was generally dominated by small sizes (2-40 mu m)
      • Aggregation of TEP was enhanced with increased Ca2+ concentration
      • Hydrodynamic process is an important factor for TEP in the bottom layer
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      Global burned area and biomass burning emissions from small fires

      J. T. Randerson, Y. Chen, G. R. van der Werf, B. M. Rogers and D. C. Morton

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002128

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      Key Points

      • Many fires are below the detection limit of 500 m burned area products
      • Small fires increase global burned area by ~35%
      • Small fires increased global carbon emissions from 1.9 to 2.5 PgC/yr
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      Correction to “Global patterns of land-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived from eddy covariance, satellite, and meteorological observations”

      Martin Jung, Markus Reichstein, Hank A. Margolis, Alessandro Cescatti, Andrew D. Richardson, M. Altaf Arain, Almut Arneth, Christian Bernhofer, Damien Bonal, Jiquan Chen, Damiano Gianelle, Nadine Gobron, Gerald Kiely, Werner Kutsch, Gitta Lasslop, Beverly E. Law, Anders Lindroth, Lutz Merbold, Leonardo Montagnani, Eddy J. Moors, Dario Papale, Matteo Sottocornola, Francesco Vaccari and Christopher Williams

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002190

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      Abundance and patterns of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in Arctic floodplain lakes of the Mackenzie River Delta

      C. Adam Chateauvert, Lance F. W. Lesack and Max L. Bothwell

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002132

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      Key Points

      • First study of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in arctic floodplain lakes
      • TEP is important but abundances differ from expectations based on marine systems
      • TEP needs further study in lakes with high primary production and complex DOC
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      Empirical assessment of uncertainties of meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes in the AmeriFlux network

      Andres Schmidt, Chad Hanson, W. Stephen Chan and Beverly E. Law

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002100

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      Key Points

      • First comprehensive analysis of instrumental errors/uncertainties for flux network
      • Turbulent fluxes exhibit highest error values
      • The network-wide data quality was found to be encouraging
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      Impact of seabird activity on nitrous oxide and methane fluxes from High Arctic tundra in Svalbard, Norway

      Renbin Zhu, Qingqing Chen, Wei Ding and Hua Xu

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012JG002130

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      Key Points

      • Seabird colony tundra ecosystems are the hotspots for N2O and CH4 emissions
      • Seabird activity intensity affected N2O and CH4 emissions from the tundra
      • Seabird activity and warming climate will enhance tundra N2O and CH4 emissions

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