Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences

Cover image for Vol. 118 Issue 3

3rd Quarter 2013

Volume 118, Issue 3

Pages 963–1346

  1. Regular Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    3. Corrections
    1. Differentiating the degradation dynamics of algal and terrestrial carbon within complex natural dissolved organic carbon in temperate lakes (pages 963–973)

      François Guillemette, S. Leigh McCallister and Paul A. del Giorgio

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20077

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      Key Points

      • Algal and terrestrial C degraded in parallel but differentially
      • High bacterial consumption of terrestrial organic C on short- and long-term
      • Phosphorus increases the degradation of terrestrial DOC in lakes
    2. Effects of bark beetle-caused tree mortality on biogeochemical and biogeophysical MODIS products (pages 974–982)

      Benjamin C. Bright, Jeffrey A. Hicke and Arjan J. H. Meddens

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20078

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      Key Points

      • We quantified land surface changes following bark beetle outbreaks with MODIS
      • LST and winter albedo increased following beetle-caused tree mortality
      • LAI, GPP, and ET (each derived from the same reflectances) decreased
    3. Alternative ways of using field-based estimates to calibrate ecosystem models and their implications for carbon cycle studies (pages 983–993)

      Yujie He, Qianlai Zhuang, A. David McGuire, Yaling Liu and Min Chen

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20080

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      Key Points

      • Species-, PFT-, and biome-level parameterizations influence modeled C dynamics
      • Biome-level model parameterization may produce biased estimate
      • Improved theoretical basis for species classification in models is needed
    4. Evening methane emission pulses from a boreal wetland correspond to convective mixing in hollows (pages 994–1005)

      Casey M. Godwin, Patrick J. McNamara and Corey D. Markfort

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20082

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      Key Points

      • Tower measurements exhibited methane pulses not captured by flux chambers
      • Diurnal emissions of methane dominated by thermal destratification in hollows
      • Chamber flux exceeded tower flux during the daytime due to spatial heterogeneity
    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      K-Pg extinction patterns in marine and freshwater environments: The impact winter model (pages 1006–1014)

      Douglas S. Robertson, William M. Lewis, Peter M. Sheehan and Owen B. Toon

      Article first published online: 11 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20086

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      Key Points

      • Marine K-Pg extinction was due to loss of photosynthesis in an impact winter
      • It was separated in time from the terrestrial extinctions by months to years
      • Lack of extinction in freshwater is due to the resilience of those ecosystems
    6. Constraining spatial variability of methane ebullition seeps in thermokarst lakes using point process models (pages 1015–1034)

      Katey M. Walter Anthony and Peter Anthony

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20087

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      Key Points

      • Spatial heterogeneity in methane ebullition challenges whole-lake flux estimates
      • Methane seeps are associated with specific thermokarst features in lake bottoms
      • Point-process modeling provided a solution to quantifying spatial variability
    7. Regional dynamics of forest canopy change and underlying causal processes in the contiguous U.S. (pages 1035–1053)

      Karen Schleeweis, Samuel N. Goward, Chengquan Huang, Jeffrey G. Masek, Gretchen Moisen, Robert E. Kennedy and Nancy E. Thomas

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20076

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      Key Points

      • Disturbance conversion and canopy change trends across multiple scales
      • Harvest is dominant canopy change process across CONUS
      • Improved geographic model of forest change processes with regional case studies
    8. Aerosol-nutrient-induced picoplankton growth in Lake Tahoe (pages 1054–1067)

      Katherine R. M. Mackey, Deborah Hunter, Emily V. Fischer, Yilun Jiang, Brant Allen, Ying Chen, Anne Liston, John Reuter, Geoff Schladow and Adina Paytan

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20084

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      Key Points

      • Atmospheric aerosols provide nutrients with a high N:P ratio in Lake Tahoe
      • The high N:P ratio of aerosols may favor the growth of picoplankton
      • Particles from fires are highly enriched in nitrogen
    9. Nitrogen production from geochemical weathering of rocks in southwest Montana, USA (pages 1068–1078)

      Galena G. Montross, Brian L. McGlynn, Scott N. Montross and Kristin K. Gardner

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20085

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      Key Points

      • Rock flours produced varying concentrations of N under lab conditions
      • Rocks from the Kootenai Formation produced the highest concentrations of NO3
      • There was a distinct range in 15N-NO3 values of rock weathering slurries
    10. biogeochemistry

      Historical reconstruction of organic carbon decay and preservation in sediments on the East China Sea shelf (pages 1079–1093)

      Xinxin Li, Thomas S. Bianchi, Mead A. Allison, Piers Chapman and Guipeng Yang

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20079

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      Key Points

      • OC distribution in ECS sediment showed temporal and spatial variability.
      • Terrestrial OC preservation in ECS sediment records river discharge variability.
      • Marine derived OC prefers to decay with sediment depth.
    11. Losses of NO and N2O emissions from Venezuelan and other worldwide tropical N-fertilized soils (pages 1094–1104)

      Sorena Marquina, Loreto Donoso, Tibisay Pérez, Jenie Gil and Eugenio Sanhueza

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20081

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      Key Points

      • LAN (loss of the applied N-fertilizer) evaluation in tropical crop soils
      • N-fertilizer loss as direct NO and N2O soil emissions
      • Comparison of LAN values obtained from tillage and non-tillage corn crops
    12. Towards closing the watershed nitrogen budget: Spatial and temporal scaling of denitrification (pages 1105–1119)

      Jonathan M. Duncan, Peter M. Groffman and Lawrence E. Band

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20090

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      Key Points

      • Spatial/temporal framework used to estimate watershed scale denitrification
      • Riparian zone microtopography controls watershed scale denitrification
      • Hot spots are more important to denitrification than are hot moments
    13. Assessment of the total, stomatal, cuticular, and soil 2 year ozone budgets of an agricultural field with winter wheat and maize crops (pages 1120–1132)

      Patrick Stella, Erwan Personne, Eric Lamaud, Benjamin Loubet, Ivonne Trebs and Pierre Cellier

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20094

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      Key Points

      • Total O3 deposition over the two-year period was 87.5 kg ha-1
      • Soil removal accounted for 55.1% of the total O3 removal
      • Simplified parameterizations underestimated O3 deposition by 20%
    14. carbon cycle

      Moisture drives surface decomposition in thawing tundra (pages 1133–1143)

      Caitlin E. Hicks Pries, E. A. G. Schuur, Jason G. Vogel and Susan M. Natali

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20089

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      Key Points

      • In tundra, surface decomposition is controlled by precipitation and water table.
      • Increased soil moisture will lead to increased decomposition losses.
      • Thaw-caused plant community composition changes did not affect decomposition.
    15. Lidar-derived estimate and uncertainty of carbon sink in successional phases of woody encroachment (pages 1144–1155)

      Temuulen Sankey, Rupesh Shrestha, Joel B. Sankey, Stuart Hardegree and Eva Strand

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20088

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      Key Points

      • Lidar accurately estimates juniper tree cover and density
      • Lidar accurately estimates juniper tree biomass
      • Later successional phases have twice the C storage compared to the early stages
    16. biogeochemistry

      Effect of rainfall seasonality on carbon storage in tropical dry ecosystems (pages 1156–1167)

      Tyler Rohr, Stefano Manzoni, Xue Feng, Rômulo S. C. Menezes and Amilcare Porporato

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20091

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      Key Points

      • Seasonal rainfall drives unique optima in mean carbon storage and productivity
      • Decomposition and litterfall compete to further complicate carbon cycling
      • Future carbon storage becomes a function of current and projected climate trends
    17. Dynamics of component carbon fluxes in a semi-arid Acacia woodland, central Australia (pages 1168–1185)

      James Cleverly, Nicolas Boulain, Randol Villalobos-Vega, Nicole Grant, Ralph Faux, Cameron Wood, Peter G. Cook, Qiang Yu, Andrea Leigh and Derek Eamus

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20101

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      Key Points

      • Photosynthesis of C3 and C4 species was enhanced by heavy rainfall
      • Soil moisture contributed to avoiding net carbon loss during drought
      • Respiration was limited by substrate availability, moisture, LAI and GPP
    18. Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem models applied to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (pages 1186–1199)

      S. Yi, N. Li, B. Xiang, X. Wang, B. Ye and A. D. McGuire

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20093

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      Key Points

      • Surface temperature is a critical boundary condition for soil temperature simulation
      • The calculation of surface temperature is very simple in ecosystem models
      • We presented an algorithm to calculate soil surface temperature
    19. Integrating carbon emissions from lakes and streams in a subarctic catchment (pages 1200–1207)

      Erik J. Lundin, Reiner Giesler, Andreas Persson, Megan S. Thompson and Jan Karlsson

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20092

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      Key Points

      • Streams and lakes are atmospheric sources of CO2 and CH4
      • Streams dominate the CO2 emissions while lakes dominate the CH4 emissions
      • Carbon emission was considerably larger than the downstream carbon export
    20. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Integrating a process-based ecosystem model with Landsat imagery to assess impacts of forest disturbance on terrestrial carbon dynamics: Case studies in Alabama and Mississippi (pages 1208–1224)

      Guangsheng Chen, Hanqin Tian, Chengquan Huang, Stephen A. Prior and Shufen Pan

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20098

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      Key Points

      • Remote sensing data was used to estimate forest mortality rate
      • Forest disturbance resulted in large carbon emissions
      • Slow recovery of biomass was the main causes of carbon release
    21. Linking aboveground net primary productivity to soil carbon and dissolved organic carbon in complex terrain (pages 1225–1236)

      Fox S. Peterson and Kate J. Lajtha

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20097

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      Key Points

      • ANPP is positively related to litter fall and exportable DOC
      • Heat Index integrates topography and predicts SOC and DOC
      • No relationship between litter and SOM or soil DOC pools
    22. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacterial diversity, abundance, and activity in marsh sediments of the Yangtze Estuary (pages 1237–1246)

      Lijun Hou, Yanling Zheng, Min Liu, Jun Gong, Xiaoli Zhang, Guoyu Yin and Li You

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20108

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      Key Points

      • Salinity was a key factor controlling distribution of anammox bacteria
      • Anammox rates was closely related to abundance of anammox bacteria
      • Denitrification was a primary source of nitrite for anammox bacteria
    23. The global NPP dependence on ENSO: La Niña and the extraordinary year of 2011 (pages 1247–1255)

      A. Bastos, Steven W. Running, Célia Gouveia and Ricardo M. Trigo

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20100

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      Key Points

      • Global NPP is strongly anti-correlated to El-Nino Southern Oscillation
      • Water availability in southern sub-tropical ecosystems drives this relationship
      • The remarkable La-Nina in 2011 enhanced the carbon uptake by land ecosystems
    24. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Reconstruction of soil moisture for the past 100 years in eastern Siberia by using δ13C of larch tree rings (pages 1256–1265)

      Shunsuke Tei, Atsuko Sugimoto, Hitoshi Yonenobu, Takeshi Yamazaki and Trofim C. Maximov

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20110

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      Key Points

      • We reconstructed soil moisture in eastern Siberia using tree-ring delta-13C.
      • Drought and wet episodes for eastern Siberia were accurately illustrated.
      • Tree-ring delta-13C and width were compared to examine reliability.
    25. Upscaling terrestrial carbon dioxide fluxes in Alaska with satellite remote sensing and support vector regression (pages 1266–1281)

      Masahito Ueyama, Kazuhito Ichii, Hiroki Iwata, Eugénie S. Euskirchen, Donatella Zona, Adrian V. Rocha, Yoshinobu Harazono, Chie Iwama, Taro Nakai and Walter C. Oechel

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20095

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      Key Points

      • CO2 fluxes at 21 sites in Alaska are upscaled with a machine learning technique
      • Disturbance information is the key to understand the trend in decade of fluxes
      • Magnitude of empirically upscaled fluxes is consistent with an inversion model
    26. Annual budget and seasonal variation of aboveground and belowground net primary productivity in a lowland dipterocarp forest in Borneo (pages 1282–1296)

      Lip Khoon Kho, Yadvinder Malhi and Sylvester Kheng San Tan

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20109

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      Keypoints

      • Seasonal allocation of net primary productivity in a Bornean forest
      • Marked seasonality for tropical forest under aseasonal environmental conditions
      • Contrasting seasonality in different soil types
    27. wetlands

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Gas exchange in wetlands with emergent vegetation: The effects of wind and thermal convection at the air-water interface (pages 1297–1306)

      Cristina M. Poindexter and Evan A. Variano

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20099

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      Key Points

      • Gas transfer velocities are measured in a model wetland in the laboratory
      • Gas transfer varied non-linearly with wind speed and surface heat loss
      • Thermal convection likely drives most hydrodynamic gas transport in wetlands
    28. Multiyear measurements of ebullitive methane flux from three subarctic lakes (pages 1307–1321)

      Martin Wik, Patrick M. Crill, Ruth K. Varner and David Bastviken

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20103

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      Key Points

      • Lake ebullition is a variable yet important source of atmospheric methane
      • The water depth dependency of ebullition shifts over summer
      • Frequent sampling over long time periods is critical to quantify ebullition
    29. The implications of minimum stomatal conductance on modeling water flux in forest canopies (pages 1322–1333)

      D. M. Barnard and W. L. Bauerle

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20112

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      Key Points

      • Minimum stomatal conductance (g0) strongly influences transpiration estimates
      • g0 is typically determined as an extrapolated value, not measured
      • Direct observations of g0 result in more accurate water flux estimates
    30. Identification of unrecognized tundra fire events on the north slope of Alaska (pages 1334–1344)

      Benjamin M. Jones, Amy L. Breen, Benjamin V. Gaglioti, Daniel H. Mann, Adrian V. Rocha, Guido Grosse, Christopher D. Arp, Michael L. Kunz and Donald A. Walker

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20113

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      Key Points

      • Discovery of unrecognized tundra fires on the North Slope of Alaska
      • The AR Fire is not unprecedented in in size over the last ~100 to 150 years
      • Past fires on the North Slope may partially explain present tundra shrub cover
  2. Corrections

    1. Top of page
    2. Regular Articles
    3. Corrections
    1. Correction to “Attributing carbon changes in conterminous U.S. forests to disturbance and non-disturbance factors from 1901 to 2010” (pages 1345–1346)

      Fangmin Zhang, Jing M. Chen, Yude Pan, Richard A. Birdsey, Shuanghe Shen, Weimin Ju and Liming He

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20083

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