Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 3

March 2014

Volume 119, Issue 3

Pages i–iv, 181–507

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Brief Reports
    4. Research Articles
    1. Issue Information (pages i–iv)

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20104

  2. Brief Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Brief Reports
    4. Research Articles
    1. Beyond leaf color: Comparing camera-based phenological metrics with leaf biochemical, biophysical, and spectral properties throughout the growing season of a temperate deciduous forest (pages 181–191)

      Xi Yang, Jianwu Tang and John F. Mustard

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002460

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Compare camera phenological metrics to weekly leaf properties along whole season
      • Observed mismatch between canopy greenness and leaf chlorophyll in the spring
      • Vegetation senescence can be quantified from camera redness in the fall.
  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Brief Reports
    4. Research Articles
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      An ecohydrological framework for grass displacement by woody plants in savannas (pages 192–206)

      Kailiang Yu and Paolo D'Odorico

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002577

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Woody plants displaces grasses through soil water and light limitations
      • An ecohydrological framework is developed
      • Bistable dynamics emerge from fire-vegetation feedbacks
    2. Carbon release from boreal peatland open water pools: Implication for the contemporary C exchange (pages 207–222)

      Luc Pelletier, Ian B. Strachan, Michelle Garneau and Nigel T. Roulet

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002423

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Pools were constant sources of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere
      • The C release during ice melt represented 15% of annual loss
      • Annual C release is the same order of magnitude as NECB but with opposite sign
    3. Using field data to assess model predictions of surface and ground fuel consumption by wildfire in coniferous forests of California (pages 223–235)

      Jamie M. Lydersen, Brandon M. Collins, Carol M. Ewell, Alicia L. Reiner, Jo Ann Fites, Christopher B. Dow, Patrick Gonzalez, David S. Saah and John J. Battles

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002475

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Measured fuel load immediately before and after six wildfires
      • Compared observed consumption to predicted for several fuel classifications
      • Inaccurate fuel load predictions led to error in estimates of consumption
    4. Diurnal cycle of lake methane flux (pages 236–248)

      E. Podgrajsek, E. Sahlée and A. Rutgersson

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002327

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Lake methane emissions investigated with the eddy covariance method
      • Methane flux can exhibits a strong diurnal cycle
    5. Spatial and temporal patterns of global burned area in response to anthropogenic and environmental factors: Reconstructing global fire history for the 20th and early 21st centuries (pages 249–263)

      Jia Yang, Hanqin Tian, Bo Tao, Wei Ren, John Kush, Yongqiang Liu and Yuhang Wang

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002532

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Global burned area data set was reconstructed by using fire model simulation
      • Global burned area showed a downward trend in the twentieth century
      • Human and environmental factors were critical in shaping fire regimes
    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A model-based insight into the coupling of nitrogen and sulfur cycles in a coastal upwelling system (pages 264–285)

      Muchamad Al Azhar, Donald E. Canfield, Katja Fennel, Bo Thamdrup and Christian J. Bjerrum

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2012JG002271

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • New biogeochemical submodule in the Regional Ocean Model System is presented
      • Coupled nitrogen and sulfur cycles in a coastal upwelling system is analyzed
      • Significant contribution of nitrate and sulfate reduction to remineralizations
    7. A quantitative assessment of a terrestrial biosphere model's data needs across North American biomes (pages 286–300)

      Michael C. Dietze, Shawn P. Serbin, Carl Davidson, Ankur R. Desai, Xiaohui Feng, Ryan Kelly, Rob Kooper, David LeBauer, Joshua Mantooth, Kenton McHenry and Dan Wang

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002392

      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Drivers of model uncertainty are shared across biomes and functional types
      • Growth respiration, mortality, and stomatal regulation drive uncertainty
      • Accessible informatics tools facilitate model-data synthesis
    8. A 170 year spring phenology index of plants in eastern China (pages 301–311)

      Quansheng Ge, Huanjiong Wang, Jingyun Zheng, Rutishauser This and Junhu Dai

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002565

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Reconstructed 170-year spring phenology index for eastern China
      • Significant trend of SPI of -4.1 days/decade in the most recent 30-year period
      • SPI series correlates significantly with spring temperatures in the study area
    9. The sensitivity of global wildfires to simulated past, present, and future lightning frequency (pages 312–322)

      Andreas Krause, Silvia Kloster, Stiig Wilkenskjeld and Heiko Paeth

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002502

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • CG flash rate is simulated to increase by up to 21% at the end of the century
      • Global burned area was little affected by these changes
      • However, there were considerable changes on the regional scale
    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Annual patterns and budget of CO2 flux in an Arctic tussock tundra ecosystem (pages 323–339)

      Walter C. Oechel, Cheryl A. Laskowski, George Burba, Beniamino Gioli and Aram A. M. Kalhori

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002431

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Showing patterns and vulnerabilities of CO2 fluxes
      • A change from an annual sink of CO2 to an annual source
      • To predict an estimate Arctic fluxes under future conditions
    11. Organic and inorganic carbon dynamics in a karst aquifer: Santa Fe River Sink-Rise system, north Florida, USA (pages 340–357)

      Jin Jin, Andrew R. Zimmerman, Paul J. Moore and Jonathan B. Martin

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002350

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Aquifer biogeochemical processes are heterogeneously distributed
      • The subsurface is generally in C metabolic balance
      • Hotspots of organic matter mineralization and autotrophy are found
    12. Partitioning of evapotranspiration through oxygen isotopic measurements of water pools and fluxes in a temperate grassland (pages 358–372)

      Zhongmin Hu, Xuefa Wen, Xiaomin Sun, Linghao Li, Guirui Yu, Xuhui Lee and Shenggong Li

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002367

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A new model is developed to estimate δT
      • Fifteen centimeter is a reasonable depth for soil water sampling for estimating δE
      • The δET is the most critical member for partitioning
    13. The use of radiocarbon to constrain current and future soil organic matter turnover and transport in a temperate forest (pages 372–391)

      Maarten C. Braakhekke, Christian Beer, Marion Schrumpf, Altug Ekici, Bernhard Ahrens, Marcel R. Hoosbeek, Bart Kruijt, Pavel Kabat and Markus Reichstein

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002420

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • SOM turnover and transport was estimated using Bayesian calibration
      • Radiocarbon data strongly improved constraint of turnover rate of slow pool
      • Predictive simulation showed small increase of soil C stocks in 21st century
    14. The effects of temperature and nitrogen and sulfur additions on carbon accumulation in a nutrient-poor boreal mire: Decadal effects assessed using 210Pb peat chronologies (pages 392–403)

      Carolina Olid, Mats B. Nilsson, Tobias Eriksson and Jonatan Klaminder

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002365

      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • C accumulation in nutrient-poor boreal peatlands is increased by N fertilization
      • Weak effects on C accumulation induced by greenhouse warming
    15. Evaluation and improvement of a global land model against soil carbon data using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method (pages 403–417)

      Oleksandra Hararuk, Jianyang Xia and Yiqi Luo

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002535

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • There is great uncertainty associated with carbon cycle simulations
      • This uncertainty is reduced by calibrating models against globally observed data
      • Parameter calibration reduces SOC loss under climate change
    16. Controls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation (pages 418–431)

      Sara J. Klapstein, Merritt R. Turetsky, A. David McGuire, Jennifer W. Harden, Claudia I. Czimczik, Xiaomei Xu, Jeffrey P. Chanton and James M. Waddington

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002441

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Total ebullition and was greatest depended on seasonal thaw and changes in atmospheric pressure
      • Ebullition was dominated by episodic ebullition and was greatest in the youngest thaw site
      • Up to 22% of methane in late season bubbles was derived from older permafrost carbon
    17. Contrasting controls on wildland fires in Southern California during periods with and without Santa Ana winds (pages 432–450)

      Yufang Jin, James T. Randerson, Nicolas Faivre, Scott Capps, Alex Hall and Michael L. Goulden

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002541

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • We developed separate fire-climate models for Santa Ana and non-Santa Ana fires
      • Meteorology explained more temporal variability in Santa Ana fires
      • The relative importance of drivers is different for two contrasting fire types
    18. Spatial variability of phosphorus sorption dynamics in Louisiana salt marshes (pages 451–465)

      John M. Marton and Brian J. Roberts

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002486

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Phosphorus sorption is highly variable across Louisiana Gulf Coast marshes
      • P sorption is comparable between oiled and unoiled marshes two years post-spill
      • Soil iron content is the strongest predictor of P sorption
    19. Large-scale estimation and uncertainty analysis of gross primary production in Tibetan alpine grasslands (pages 466–486)

      Honglin He, Min Liu, Xiangming Xiao, Xiaoli Ren, Li Zhang, Xiaomin Sun, Yuanhe Yang, Yingnian Li, Liang Zhao, Peili Shi, Mingyuan Du, Yaoming Ma, Mingguo Ma, Yu Zhang and Guirui Yu

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002449

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A methodology for regional GPP estimation and uncertainty analysis was evaluated
      • The 6-year GPP in Tibetan grasslands are estimated using modified VPM model
      • The uncertainty of modeled GPP is quantified and traced to specific model input
    20. Modeling ecohydrological impacts of land management and water use in the Silver Creek basin, Idaho (pages 487–507)

      Maria C. Loinaz, Dayna Gross, Robert Unnasch, Michael Butts and Peter Bauer-Gottwein

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2012JG002133

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Aquatic habitat restoration strategies at the catchment-scale
      • The simulation of stream temperature with surface and groundwater dynamics
      • Ecohydrological models more predictive capability than statistical approaches

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION