Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 4

April 2014

Volume 119, Issue 4

Pages i–iv, 509–702

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    1. Issue Information (pages i–iv)

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/jgrg.20181

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    1. Daily, biweekly, and seasonal temporal scales of pCO2 variability in two stratified Mediterranean reservoirs (pages 509–520)

      María Morales-Pineda, Andrés Cózar, Irene Laiz, Bárbara Úbeda and José Á. Gálvez

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002317

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      Key Points

      • Scales of variability through temporal decomposition of hourly pCO2
      • Relationships between different pCO2 temporal modes and some controlling factors
      • Effect of sampling frequency on landscape studies and global balances
    2. Unifying soil respiration pulses, inhibition, and temperature hysteresis through dynamics of labile soil carbon and O2 (pages 521–536)

      P. Y. Oikawa, D. A. Grantz, A. Chatterjee, J. E. Eberwein, L. A. Allsman and G. D. Jenerette

      Article first published online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002434

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      Key Points

      • Wetting induced both pulses and inhibition of soil respiration
      • Diel temperature-respiration hysteresis was related to photosynthetic inputs
      • A 2 C pool soil respiration model simulated pulses, inhibition, and hysteresis
    3. Floodplain biogeochemical processing of floodwaters in the Atchafalaya River Basin during the Mississippi River flood of 2011 (pages 537–546)

      Durelle T. Scott, Richard F. Keim, Brandon L. Edwards, C. Nathan Jones and Daniel E. Kroes

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002477

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      Key Points

      • Floodwater monitored through the Atchafalaya River Basin during the 2011 flood
      • Large floods and resulting diversions lead to high river-floodplain connectivity
      • Backwaters remove nitrate resulting in decreased nitrate export to the GOM
    4. Biotic and abiotic controls on biogenic volatile organic compound fluxes from a subalpine forest floor (pages 547–556)

      Christopher M. Gray, Russell K. Monson and Noah Fierer

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002575

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      Key Points

      • Emission rates from the soil were highest for methanol and monoterpenes
      • Uptake rates into the soil were highest for isoprene and formaldehyde
      • Root presence and temperature correlated with BVOC flux rates
    5. Separate effects of flooding and anaerobiosis on soil greenhouse gas emissions and redox sensitive biogeochemistry (pages 557–566)

      Gavin McNicol and Whendee L. Silver

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002433

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      Key Points

      • Soils were incubated in crossed anaerobic headspace and flooding treatments
      • Flooding stimulated or suppressed anaerobic greenhouse gas fluxes
      • Flooding had additional biogeochemical effects independent of oxygen depletion
    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Evaluating approaches for estimating peat depth (pages 567–576)

      L. E. Parry, L. J. West, J. Holden and P. J. Chapman

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002411

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      Key Points

      • Peat depths measured concurrently using GPR and manual probing disagree
      • Error caused by probes being obstructed or extending into underlying sediments
      • GPR surveys calibrated using CMP are most reliable for measuring depth
    7. The effect of long-term water table manipulations on dissolved organic carbon dynamics in a poor fen peatland (pages 577–595)

      John A. Hribljan, Evan S. Kane, Thomas G. Pypker and Rodney A. Chimner

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002527

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      Key Points

      • Peatland DOC concentrations increased in raised and lowered water table sites
      • Quality and production of DOC were different across water table sites
    8. Heat and dissolved oxygen exchanges between the sediment and water column in a shallow salty lagoon (pages 596–613)

      Alberto de la Fuente

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002413

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      Key Points

      • Dissolved oxygen and heat fluxes at water sediment interface in shallow lagoons
      • Benthic primary production in dissolved oxygen flux at WSI
      • Heat fluxes at WSI in shallow lagoons where solar radiation heats the sediments
    9. Subsurface approaches for measuring soil CO2 isotopologue flux: Theory and application (pages 614–629)

      Nick Nickerson, Jocelyn Egan and David Risk

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002508

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      Key Points

      • A rigorous test of subsurface isotopologue flux methodologies is performed
      • Methodological uncertainties arise due to poor assumptions
      • The gradient approach was best for estimating the isotopic composition
    10. Modeling respiration from snags and coarse woody debris before and after an invasive gypsy moth disturbance (pages 630–644)

      Heidi J. Renninger, Nicholas Carlo, Kenneth L. Clark and Karina V. R. Schäfer

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002542

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      Key Points

      • Mortality increased the mass of snags and coarse woody debris fivefold
      • Respiration rates from dead stems tripled after disturbance
      • After disturbance, dead stem respiration was similar to NEE
    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Management and climate contributions to satellite-derived active fire trends in the contiguous United States (pages 645–660)

      Hsiao-Wen Lin, Jessica L. McCarty, Dongdong Wang, Brendan M. Rogers, Douglas C. Morton, G. James Collatz, Yufang Jin and James T. Randerson

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002382

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      Key Points

      • Wildland, cropland, and prescribed fires had different trends and patterns
      • Sensitivity to climate varied with fire type
      • Intensity of air quality regulation influenced cropland burning trends
    12. Organic matter transformation in the peat column at Marcell Experimental Forest: Humification and vertical stratification (pages 661–675)

      Malak M. Tfaily, William T. Cooper, Joel E. Kostka, Patrick R. Chanton, Christopher W. Schadt, Paul J. Hanson, Colleen M. Iversen and Jeffrey P. Chanton

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002492

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      Key Points

      • Physical, chemical, and spectroscopic properties of bog peat were characterized
    13. Quantify the loss of major ions induced by CO2 enrichment and nitrogen addition in subtropical model forest ecosystems (pages 676–686)

      Juxiu Liu, Deqiang Zhang, Wenjuan Huang, Guoyi Zhou, Yuelin Li and Shizhong Liu

      Article first published online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002343

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      Key Points

      • CO2 enrichment led to accelerated base cation leaching loss
      • The N addition decreased the effect of CO2 enrichment on the base cation loss
      • The N addition induced greater metal cation leaching loss
    14. The biogeochemistry of carbon across a gradient of streams and rivers within the Congo Basin (pages 687–702)

      P. J. Mann, R. G. M. Spencer, B. J. Dinga, J. R. Poulsen, P. J. Hernes, G. Fiske, M. E. Salter, Z. A. Wang, K. A. Hoering, J. Six and R. M. Holmes

      Article first published online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013JG002442

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      Key Points

      • Vegetation cover predominately controls fluvial C concentration and composition
      • Small streams (20 m wide) and wetlands are significant sources of aquatic CO2
      • Changing vegetation cover, or hydrologic conditions impact regional carbon budgets

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