Mentoring of physicians at a community-based health system: Preliminary findings

Authors

  • Patricia Tietjen MD, FACP,

    1. University of Vermont School of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont
    2. New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
    3. Department of Medicine, Danbury Hospital, Danbury, Connecticut
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  • Paul F. Griner MD, MACP

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, New York
    • Address for correspondence and reprint requests: Paul F. Griner, MD, Professor of Medicine Emeritus, University of Rochester School of Medicine, 27 Pine Summit Circle, Weston, MA 02493; Telephone: 781-894-0952; Fax: 781-891-4287; E-mail: pfgriner@aol.com

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Mentoring has been suggested as 1 way to reduce physician stress and improve professional satisfaction, yet mentoring programs for physicians have focused principally on faculties of academic medical centers. Recently, a formal mentoring program for physicians in full-time clinical practice was created at a regional health system in western Connecticut. We describe the results of a survey of mentees' impressions of the program after its first year.

METHODS

We surveyed hospitalists and other physicians who had participated in the mentoring program to determine their reasons for participation, whether the program was helpful (and if so in what ways), and their recommendations for improvement.

RESULTS

Twenty-seven of the 39 participants responded to the survey (69%). Hospitalists were the most likely to participate in the mentoring program (18 of 24) and to respond to the survey. Career planning (52%), balance among personal and professional life (43%), and leadership development (38%) were the most common reasons given for meeting with a mentor. All but 1 respondent felt the mentoring program met their expectations by setting goals (62%), planning next steps in their career(60%), and gaining new insights (52%).

CONCLUSIONS

Community-based health systems that seek to improve the professional satisfaction of their physicians should be interested in this description of the physician mentoring program of the Western Connecticut Health Network. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2013;8:642–643. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine

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