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Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training of family members before hospital discharge using video self-instruction: A feasibility trial

Authors

  • Audrey L. Blewer MPH,

    1. Center for Resuscitation Science and Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Marion Leary BSN, RN,

    1. Center for Resuscitation Science and Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Christopher S. Decker BS,

    1. Center for Resuscitation Science and Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • James C. Andersen BA,

    1. Center for Resuscitation Science and Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Amanda C. Fredericks BA,

    1. Center for Resuscitation Science and Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Bentley J. Bobrow MD,

    1. Emergency Medicine Department, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona
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    • This work was supported by a Clinical Research Program grant from the American Heart Association. The funding organization had no role in data collection, analysis or drafting of this manuscript. Ms. Leary has received honoraria from Philips Healthcare, pertaining to professional rescuer CPR quality. Dr. Abella has received research funding and honoraria from Philips Healthcare, also pertaining to professional rescuer CPR quality, and in-kind research support from Laerdal Medical Corporation. Drs. Abella and Bobrow have received research funding from Medtronic Foundation, pertaining to improving statewide cardiac arrest monitoring and reporting, and both report being members of the American Heart Association Basic Life Support Subcommittee. Dr. Bobrow has also received funding from the American Heart Association to study ultra-brief CPR video training. Dr. Abella is additionally supported by a Career Development Award from the NIH (K23HL083082) and funding from the Doris Duke Foundation.

  • Benjamin S. Abella MD MPhil

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Resuscitation Science and Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    2. Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    • 3400 Spruce Street, Ground Ravdin, Center for Resuscitation Science, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
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    • Telephone: 215-279-3452; Fax: 215-662-3953


Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are low. This is especially the case for SCA occurring in the home setting, as family members of at-risk patients are often not CPR trained.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the feasibility of a novel hospital-based CPR education program targeted to family members of patients at increased risk for SCA.

DESIGN:

Prospective, multicenter, cohort study.

SETTING:

Inpatient wards at 3 hospitals.

SUBJECTS:

Family members of inpatients admitted with cardiac-related diagnoses.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Family members were offered CPR training via a proctored video-self instruction (VSI) program. After training, CPR skills and participant perspectives regarding their training experience were assessed. Surveys were conducted one month postdischarge to measure the rate of “secondary training” of other individuals by enrolled family members. At the 3 study sites, 756 subjects were offered CPR instruction; 280 agreed to training and 136 underwent instruction using the VSI program. Of these, 78 of 136 (57%) had no previous CPR training. After training, chest compression performance was generally adequate (mean compression rate 90 ± 26/minute, mean depth 37 ± 12 mm). At 1 month, 57 of 122 (47%) of subjects performed secondary training for friends or family members, with a calculated mean of 2.1 persons trained per kit distributed.

CONCLUSIONS:

The hospital setting offers a unique “point of capture” to provide CPR instruction to an important, undertrained population in contact with at-risk individuals. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2011. © 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

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