Comparative analysis of the development of the lizard, Liolaemus tenuis tenuis. II. A series of normal postlaying stages in embryonic development

Authors

  • D. Lemus,

    1. Laboratory of Experimental Embryology, Department of Experimental Morphology, Medical School, Santiago Norte, University of Chile, Chile
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  • J. Illanes,

    1. Laboratory of Experimental Embryology, Department of Experimental Morphology, Medical School, Santiago Norte, University of Chile, Chile
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  • M. Fuenzalida,

    1. Laboratory of Experimental Embryology, Department of Experimental Morphology, Medical School, Santiago Norte, University of Chile, Chile
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  • Y. Paz De La Vega,

    1. Laboratory of Experimental Embryology, Department of Experimental Morphology, Medical School, Santiago Norte, University of Chile, Chile
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  • M. Garcia

    1. Laboratory of Experimental Embryology, Department of Experimental Morphology, Medical School, Santiago Norte, University of Chile, Chile
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Abstract

In this work, we have completed a study of the development of the ovoviviparous lizard Liolaemus tenuis tenuis. Ovoviviparity in this lizard is a condition in which eggs are retained within the reproductive duct for about 60 days. During this period the phases of segmentation, gastrulation, neurulation, presomitic, and somitic embryos transpire. During the months of December and January the eggs are laid, and at this time the embryos are comparable to stage 27 Liolaemus gravenhorsti lizard embryos, or to stage 29 Calotes versicolor lizard embryos. Differentiation of the facial region occurs between Days 12 and 42 after egg laying. Limbs develop rapidly between the 8th and 23rd days. By 53 days the appendicular skeleton is completely formed. After 36 days the mesonephros begins to degenerate, and its function is gradually taken over by the developing metanephros. Newborn lizards do not possess an egg caruncle. During the period up to hatching, there is a great increase of liquid within the egg, presumably amniotic fluid. Cracks develop in the leathery shell shortly before hatching and are, perhaps, the first sign of the onset of hatching. Increase of liquid in the egg during postlaying development accounts for its increase in weight and change in shape. Weight of the embryo at hatching does not exceed 32% of the total weight of the egg.

Ancillary