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Dorsal hump morphology in pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha)

Authors

  • Kenta Susuki,

    1. Laboratory of Studies on Marine Bioresources Conservation and Management, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan
    2. Laboratory of Aquaculture Biology, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan
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  • Masaki Ichimura,

    1. Laboratory of Studies on Marine Bioresources Conservation and Management, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan
    2. Shibetsu Salmon Museum, Shibetsu, Hokkaido, Japan
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  • Yosuke Koshino,

    1. Laboratory of Studies on Marine Bioresources Conservation and Management, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan
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  • Masahide Kaeriyama,

    1. Laboratory of Studies on Marine Bioresources Conservation and Management, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan
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  • Yasuaki Takagi,

    1. Laboratory of Aquaculture Biology, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan
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  • Shinji Adachi,

    1. Laboratory of Aquaculture Biology, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan
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  • Hideaki Kudo

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Studies on Marine Bioresources Conservation and Management, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan
    • Correspondence to: Hideaki Kudo, Laboratory of Studies on Marine Bioresources Conservation and Management, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Japan. E-mail: hidea-k@fish.hokudai.ac.jp

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ABSTRACT

Mature male Pacific salmon (Genus Oncorhynchus) develop a dorsal hump, as a secondary male sexual characteristic, during the spawning period. Previous gross anatomical studies have indicated that the dorsal humps of salmon are mainly composed of cartilaginous tissue (Davidson [1935] J Morphol 57:169–183.) However, the histological and biochemical characteristics of such humps are poorly understood. In this study, the detailed microstructures and components of the dorsal humps of pink salmon were analyzed using histochemical techniques and electrophoresis. In mature males, free interneural spines and neural spines were located in a line near to the median septum of the dorsal hump. No cartilaginous tissue was detected within the dorsal hump. Fibrous and mucous connective tissues were mainly found in three regions of the dorsal hump: i) the median septum, ii) the distal region, and iii) the crescent-shaped region. Both the median septum and distal region consisted of connective tissue with a high water content, which contained elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid. It was also demonstrated that the lipid content of the dorsal hump connective tissue was markedly decreased in the mature males compared with the immature and maturing males. Although, the crescent-shaped region of the hump consisted of connective tissue, it did not contain elastic fibers, hyaluronic acid, or lipids. In an ultrastructural examination, it was found that all of the connective tissues in the dorsal hump were composed of collagen fibers. Gel electrophoresis of collagen extracts from these tissues found that the collagen in the dorsal hump is composed of Type I collagen, as is the case in salmon skin. These results indicate that in male pink salmon the dorsal hump is formed as a result of an increase in the amount of connective tissue, rather than cartilage, and the growth of free interneural spines and neural spines. J. Morphol. 275:514–527, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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