Focal liver lesions: Comparison of dual-phase CT and multisequence multiplanar MR imaging including dynamic gadolinium enhancement

Authors

  • Richard C. Semelka MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
    • Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina - CB 7510, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7510
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Diego R. Martin MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Cem Balci MD,

    1. Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
    2. Department of Radiology, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Trang Lance MS

    1. School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare dual-phase spiral computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using dynamic gadolinium enhancement for liver lesion detection and characterization. Twenty-two consecutive patients underwent dual-phase spiral CT and MRI for the evaluation of focal liver disease within a 1-month period. Spiral CT and MR images were interpreted prospectively, in a blinded fashion by separate, individual, experienced investigators, to determine lesion detection and characterization. Liver lesions were confirmed by surgery and pathology in 6 patients, and by clinical and imaging follow-up in the other 16 patients. Pathological correlation of a primary extrahepatic malignancy was available in 5 of the 16 patients who had metastatic liver disease. Spiral CT and MRI detected 53 and 63 lesions, and characterized 39 and 62 true positive lesions, respectively. A kappa statistic test was applied to assess agreement between MR and CT results. MR versus CT for lesion detection resulted in a kappa statistic of 0.54 (95% confidence interval), indicating moderate agreement, and 0.32 (95% confidence interval) for lesion characterization, indicating only slight agreement. More lesions were detected on MR images than CT images in 6 (27%) patients, with lesions detected only on MR images in 4 (18%) patients. More lesions were characterized on MR images in 9 (41%) patients. In 9 patients with a discrepancy between MR and CT findings, the MR images added information considered significant to patient management in all 9 cases. MRI was moderately superior to dual-phase spiral CT for lesion detection, and was markedly superior for lesion characterization, with these differences having clinical significance. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2001;13:397–401. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary