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Time-resolved analysis of coronary vein motion and cross-sectional area

Authors

  • Jonathan D. Suever BS,

    1. Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology / Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • Pierre J. Watson BS,

    1. Department of Radiology & Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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    • Mr. Suever and Mr. Watson contributed equally to this article.

  • Robert L. Eisner PhD,

    1. Department of Radiology & Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • Stamatios Lerakis MD,

    1. Department of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • Robert E. O'Donnell MD,

    1. Department of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • John N. Oshinski PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology / Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    2. Department of Radiology & Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    • Department of Radiology, Emory University School of Medicine, 1364 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322
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Abstract

Purpose:

To quantify periods of low motion and cross-sectional area changes of the coronary veins during the cardiac cycle for planning magnetic resonance coronary venograms (MRCV).

Materials and Methods:

Images were acquired from 19 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 13 patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The displacement and cross-sectional area of the coronary sinus was tracked, and periods of low motion were defined as consecutive time points during which the position of the coronary sinus remained within a 0.67-mm diameter region. Patients were classified as systolic dominant or diastolic dominant based on the relative duration of their low motion periods.

Results:

All CRT patients were classified as systolic dominant, and 32% of these had no separate diastolic rest period. All CAD patients with ejection fraction < 35% were classified as systolic dominant, while all CAD patients with ejection fraction > 35%were diastolic dominant. In 77% of all subjects, the cross-sectional area of the coronary sinus was larger in systole than in diastole.

Conclusion:

The movement of the coronary sinus can be used to classify patients as either having a longer systolic or diastolic rest period. The classification of the CRT patients as systolic dominant suggests that MRCVs be acquired in systole for CRT planning; however, each patient's low motion periods should be categorized to ensure the correct period is being used to minimize motion artifacts. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2011;. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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