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Real-time magnetic resonance imaging of normal swallowing

Authors

  • Shuo Zhang PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie, Göttingen, Germany
    • Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie, Am Fassberg 11, 37070 Göttingen, Germany
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    • S.Z. and A.O. contributed equally to this study.

  • Arno Olthoff MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Phoniatrics and Pedaudiology, Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen, Germany
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    • S.Z. and A.O. contributed equally to this study.

  • Jens Frahm PhD

    1. Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie, Göttingen, Germany
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Abstract

Purpose:

To evaluate the use of a novel real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for the assessment of normal swallowing dynamics.

Materials and Methods:

In a cohort of 10 healthy subjects, real-time MRI movies at 24.3 frames per second were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial orientation during self-controlled swallows of 5 mL pineapple juice as oral contrast bolus. All studies were performed with the use of a commercial MRI system at 3 T combining two sets of radiofrequency receiver coils. Real-time movies relied on a fast low-angle shot (FLASH) MRI sequence with radial undersampling and image reconstruction by nonlinear inversion yielding 41.23 msec acquisition time for an in-plane resolution of 1.5 mm. Evaluations focused on clinical image quality as well as visualization and temporal quantification of distinct swallowing functions.

Results:

Throughout the entire process, the swallowing dynamics were well depicted and characterized with almost no visible image artifacts in all subjects. The mid-sagittal plane turned out to be most valuable. The movies allowed for a quantitative determination of the temporal pattern of all swallowing events.

Conclusion:

The proposed real-time MRI technique yields noninvasive, robust, and quantitative access to the physiology of normal swallowing in healthy subjects at high temporal resolution and image quality. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2012;35:1372–1379. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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