Measuring the longitudinal relaxation time of GABA in vivo at 3 tesla

Authors

  • Nicolaas A.J. Puts PhD,

    1. Russel H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    2. FM Kirby Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 707 N Broadway, Baltimore, Maryland, 21205, USA
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  • Peter B. Barker DPhil,

    1. Russel H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    2. FM Kirby Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 707 N Broadway, Baltimore, Maryland, 21205, USA
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  • Richard A.E. Edden PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Russel H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA
    2. FM Kirby Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 707 N Broadway, Baltimore, Maryland, 21205, USA
    • Division of Neuroradiology, Park 367C, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287
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Abstract

Purpose:

To measure the in vivo longitudinal relaxation time T1 of GABA at 3 Tesla (T).

Materials and Methods:

J-difference edited single-voxel MR spectroscopy was used to isolate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signals. An increased echo time (80 ms) acquisition was used, accommodating the longer, more selective editing pulses required for symmetric editing-based suppression of co-edited macromolecular signal. Acquiring edited GABA measurements at a range of relaxation times in 10 healthy participants, a saturation-recovery equation was used to model the integrated data.

Results:

The longitudinal relaxation time of GABA was measured as T1,GABA = 1.31 ± 0.16 s.

Conclusion:

The method described has been successfully applied to measure the T1 of GABA in vivo at 3T. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2013;37:999–1003. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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