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Assessment of the efficacy of MRI for detection of changes in bone morphology in a mouse model of bone injury

Authors

  • May A. Taha BSc,

    1. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Sarah L. Manske PhD,

    1. Biomedical Engineering program, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Erika Kristensen BSc,

    1. Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Jaymi T. Taiani MSc,

    1. Department of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Roman Krawetz PhD,

    1. Departments of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Ying Wu PhD,

    1. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Dragana Ponjevic MSc,

    1. Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • John R. Matyas PhD,

    1. Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Steven K. Boyd PhD,

    1. Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    2. McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Derrick E. Rancourt PhD,

    1. Departments of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Jeff F. Dunn PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    • Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Dr., NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N1. E-mail: dunnj@ucalgary.ca

Abstract

Purpose

To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be used to track changes in skeletal morphology during bone healing using high-resolution micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a standard. We used a mouse model of bone injury to compare μCT with MRI.

Materials and Methods

Surgery was performed to induce a burr hole fracture in the mouse tibia. A selection of biomaterials was immediately implanted into the fractures. First we optimized the imaging sequences by testing different MRI pulse sequences. Then changes in bone morphology over the course of fracture repair were assessed using in vivo MRI and μCT. Histology was performed to validate the imaging outcomes.

Results

The rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) sequence provided sufficient contrast between bone and the surrounding tissues to clearly reveal the fracture. It allowed detection of the fracture clearly 1 and 14 days postsurgery and revealed soft tissue changes that were not clear on μCT. In MRI and μCT the fracture was seen at day 1 and partial healing was detected at day 14.

Conclusion

The RARE sequence was the most suitable for MRI bone imaging. It enabled the detection of hard and even soft tissue changes. These findings suggest that MRI could be an effective imaging modality for assessing changes in bone morphology and pathobiology. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2013;38:231–237. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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