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Hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation

Authors

  • Miranda Kirby BSc,

    1. Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Canada
    2. Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
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  • Nikhil Kanhere BE,

    1. Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Canada
    2. Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
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  • Roya Etemad-Rezai MD,

    1. Department of Medical Imaging, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
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  • David G. McCormack MD,

    1. Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
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  • Grace Parraga PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Canada
    2. Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
    3. Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
    4. Department of Medical Imaging, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
    • Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada, N6A 5K8
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Abstract

A chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exsmoker underwent pulmonary function tests and hyperpolarized helium-3 (3He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serially over 4 years, twice prior to and twice following an acute exacerbation (AE). About 2.5 years pre-AE, 3He ventilation defect percent (VDP) was 16%, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was 0.34 cm2/s, and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) was 41%pred. Six months pre-AE, VDP and ADC were worse (29% and 0.38 cm2/s, respectively) without worsening FEV1 (47%pred). After hospitalization and AE treatment, VDP was 20%, whereas FEV1 did not improve (45%pred); 16 months post-AE, both VDP and ADC remained improved and similar to 4 years prior. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2013;37:1223–1227. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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